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Business Structure

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NEWS
January 2, 1991 | By MARK A. ROSENBAUM and THOMAS P. FOLEY
With half of President Bush's term behind us, political observers naturally look toward the presidential elections of 1992. Sadly, two anachronisms of presidential politics remain in place. While the electoral college appears doomed to constitutional continuation, the meaningless office of vice president could be enhanced by a political party with vision. With Vice President Dan Quayle "still gaining acceptance" (apologies to Dana Carvey of Saturday Night Live), a change to a meaningful vice presidency in 1992 must come from the Democratic ticket.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after putting them up, Unisys Corp. is tearing down its three "silos. " The Blue Bell technology company said yesterday it would no longer be organized into the three business units formed in 1996. Instead, it is moving to an integrated structure designed to present all of the company's products and services in a unified way. No layoffs are planned. In addition, it is realigning its 1,800-member sales force and reshuffling its executive suite. The news propelled Unisys' stock, which closed at $30, up $5.31 on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Individuals who have lost their jobs, and who live in Philadelphia and the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, are eligible for a free business- applications computer-training program sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition. "What we're finding is that people can be motivated, but if they don't have computer skills, they don't have an asset," said Ronald Spangler, director of training at the Berkeley Education and Training Center. Individually tailored skills training will be offered in areas including computer literacy and specific programs.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you dream of working for yourself, a seminar April 20 may be of interest. The Small Business Assistance Center is holding a forum entitled "How to Start and Operate a Small Business" from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Chadds Ford Ramada Inn, Routes 1 and 202, Glen Mills. Topics will include selecting a business structure, the use of a business plan, liability insurance, financing, accounting systems, tax liability, and IRS rules and penalties. "Although each year, thousands of businesses are created, most entrepreneurs are not familiar with the 'nuts and bolts' of starting and operating their businesses," said the center's director, Frank P. Farmer.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Small businesses take center stage this month, with three seminars scheduled. Topics on starting them, obtaining financing for them, and related topics. Tomorrow, the U.S. House of Representatives' Small Business Committee will hold a seminar at Beaver College to examine the progress made in increasing opportunities for small businesses owned by women. The program will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the college's Grey Towers Castle, Church Road and Limekiln Pike, Glenside. For more information, call Connie Williams at U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky's office, 610-667-3666.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Foreign Policy Research Institute on Friday will sponsor a seminar, "Doing Business in China," designed to help business operators avoid many pitfalls in China, including unpredictable government policies, a chronic shortage of foreign exchange, a potential national leadership crisis, and baffling negotiation. The workshop is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Alco Standard Corp., 825 Diportail Rd., Wayne. Cost, including continental breakfast and buffet luncheon, is $35 for institute members, $50 for nonmembers.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The North Penn Chamber of Commerce is hosting a program, "Taking Charge of Change Before Change Takes Charge of You," from 7:45 to 10 a.m. Sept. 16 at the William Penn Inn, Route 202 and Sumneytown Pike, Gwynedd. Speaker Douglas R. Harbaugh, training consultant with Mark S. Norman & Associates, will share insights on helping employees develop positive attitudes toward change, planning for expected changes, and change and its importance to survival, continuity and growth of a company.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although the Year 2000 computer problem failed to shake up the world, Unisys Corp. is feeling the aftershocks - in the form of stagnant sales. The Blue Bell company, which provides computer hardware, software and services, said yesterday it ended 1999 with a 76 percent increase in earnings, but Y2K-related spending slowdowns and unfavorable foreign-exchange rates held sales growth to just 4 percent for the year. For the fourth quarter, sales dropped 4.8 percent. Hardware sales alone fell nearly 15 percent, while services revenue was flat.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The woman beside me is, by any measure, a success story. The business she started three years ago already has shown more than a respectable profit. She has a dozen people working for her now. She talks eagerly about the advantanges of being her own boss, the excitement of running her own show. She tells me her plans for the future. But when I ask why she left the corporation, some of the sheen of optimism dulls. It's hard to explain, she says. She had been there for years.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1994 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What would you, an American male business traveler, do if you were walking down the street in an Arab city with your local host and business partner and he took your hand as though you were lovers? The answer, according to specialists in international business protocol, is not to pull away. The gesture is one of friendship and trust among Arab men, and may indicate that your business relationship is developing well, the specialists say. Having that kind of knowledge about local customs and traditions is vital to doing business in different parts of the world because cultural faux pas could be the undoing of an otherwise promising deal, the experts caution.
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NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCIL is closer to making sweeping changes to how the city taxes all businesses, in an attempt to attract and retain firms within the city limits. A bill aiming to sweeten the pot for businesses looking to move and stay within the city of Philadelphia made headway in City Council yesterday when it moved out of committee, although it may be months before it goes to Council for a final vote. The bill, introduced by Councilman Bill Green, would eliminate the net-income portion of the Business Income and Receipts Tax (BIRT)
BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Think about it," Alan Mulally implored: Just 14 months ago, the top executive at Ford Motor Co. was seated alongside his compadres at soon-to-be-bankrupt General Motors and Chrysler, at a congressional panel considering pleas for emergency taxpayer loans. "Isn't that incredible?" Mulally said, wide-eyed and proud as he wound back the clock Friday morning during an unusual stop in Philadelphia. With global rival Toyota hobbled by a recall crisis and Ford hot off its first reported full-year profit since 2005, the lone U.S. automaker that avoided bankruptcy and bailout aid is on a recession roll that would have seemed unimaginable a year ago. And Mulally, an aeronautical engineer and longtime Boeing Co. executive who took over at Ford less than four years ago with a plan to make the beleaguered automaker more like Toyota, is starting to look like the smartest guy in Motor City.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although the Year 2000 computer problem failed to shake up the world, Unisys Corp. is feeling the aftershocks - in the form of stagnant sales. The Blue Bell company, which provides computer hardware, software and services, said yesterday it ended 1999 with a 76 percent increase in earnings, but Y2K-related spending slowdowns and unfavorable foreign-exchange rates held sales growth to just 4 percent for the year. For the fourth quarter, sales dropped 4.8 percent. Hardware sales alone fell nearly 15 percent, while services revenue was flat.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after putting them up, Unisys Corp. is tearing down its three "silos. " The Blue Bell technology company said yesterday it would no longer be organized into the three business units formed in 1996. Instead, it is moving to an integrated structure designed to present all of the company's products and services in a unified way. No layoffs are planned. In addition, it is realigning its 1,800-member sales force and reshuffling its executive suite. The news propelled Unisys' stock, which closed at $30, up $5.31 on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Foreign Policy Research Institute on Friday will sponsor a seminar, "Doing Business in China," designed to help business operators avoid many pitfalls in China, including unpredictable government policies, a chronic shortage of foreign exchange, a potential national leadership crisis, and baffling negotiation. The workshop is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Alco Standard Corp., 825 Diportail Rd., Wayne. Cost, including continental breakfast and buffet luncheon, is $35 for institute members, $50 for nonmembers.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1994 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What would you, an American male business traveler, do if you were walking down the street in an Arab city with your local host and business partner and he took your hand as though you were lovers? The answer, according to specialists in international business protocol, is not to pull away. The gesture is one of friendship and trust among Arab men, and may indicate that your business relationship is developing well, the specialists say. Having that kind of knowledge about local customs and traditions is vital to doing business in different parts of the world because cultural faux pas could be the undoing of an otherwise promising deal, the experts caution.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Small businesses take center stage this month, with three seminars scheduled. Topics on starting them, obtaining financing for them, and related topics. Tomorrow, the U.S. House of Representatives' Small Business Committee will hold a seminar at Beaver College to examine the progress made in increasing opportunities for small businesses owned by women. The program will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the college's Grey Towers Castle, Church Road and Limekiln Pike, Glenside. For more information, call Connie Williams at U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky's office, 610-667-3666.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The North Penn Chamber of Commerce is hosting a program, "Taking Charge of Change Before Change Takes Charge of You," from 7:45 to 10 a.m. Sept. 16 at the William Penn Inn, Route 202 and Sumneytown Pike, Gwynedd. Speaker Douglas R. Harbaugh, training consultant with Mark S. Norman & Associates, will share insights on helping employees develop positive attitudes toward change, planning for expected changes, and change and its importance to survival, continuity and growth of a company.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Individuals who have lost their jobs, and who live in Philadelphia and the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, are eligible for a free business- applications computer-training program sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition. "What we're finding is that people can be motivated, but if they don't have computer skills, they don't have an asset," said Ronald Spangler, director of training at the Berkeley Education and Training Center. Individually tailored skills training will be offered in areas including computer literacy and specific programs.
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