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BUSINESS
April 25, 1986 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press also contributed to this article)
For some multinational corporations, the prospect of travel overseas is increasingly being seen as a risky business. The Du Pont Co. has issued an outright ban on business travel by its employees to the Middle East and curtailed all but the most pressing travel to Europe, a company spokeswoman said yesterday. "People may have meetings they can postpone," said Faith Wohl of Du Pont, referring to European trips. "If there is a need, they have to go ahead and do it. " She noted that the company has plants, refineries or laboratories in most European countries.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2002 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before Sept. 11, some of the nation's biggest airlines had a problem in its seminal stage: Many of their best customers were beginning to rebel against airfares they considered too high. Today, what started as a trickle has become a flood, with travel managers at companies large and small working every angle they can think of to cut spending on airlines. At a conference of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives here last week, travel managers for hundreds of U.S., Canadian and European companies said such cost-cutting represented a fundamental shift in the way their companies look at travel - a change that for some has cut their spending in half in just two years.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2010 | By Tom Belden
CHICAGO - Companies that spend millions of dollars a year for international business travel are grappling with a new problem: How exactly do their people plan trips to Europe and throughout the continent when a pesky Icelandic volcano not only makes a mess of airline schedules but could also continue spewing ash into the air for months, years, or even centuries? No topic prompted more discussion than "the volcano" at the annual education conference of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives here last week.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania officials spent thousands of dollars here last week trying to please people like the leader of a motorcycle gang that may want to roar around the southeastern part of the state riding Harley Davidsons. The difference between this gang and the Hells Angels, however, is vast. This gang is a group of about 10 senior managers of Deutsche Bank, one of Europe's largest financial institutions. Its members are aged 30 to 50, and their leader is vice president Christoph Speir, a bank travel manager.
REAL_ESTATE
July 19, 2009 | By Christine Bahls FOR THE INQUIRER
Who knows what the home of Stanley and Kathy Warchol would look like if it hadn't been for his job? For 36 years, while he traveled for an international electronics company, Stanley Warchol collected art, vases, figurines, and more from throughout Asia and Europe and brought them home to his Tudor-style stone house in Northeast Philadelphia. Those purchases are in evidence everywhere. Above the fireplace hang four pictures from Shanghai, each of the same Chinese village, but in different seasons.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New radio ads next month will try to lure tourists here to meet Ben Franklin. But, in fact, there might be less of Ben Franklin to see, with city budget cuts likely leaving fewer colonial actors walking through Philadelphia's historic streets. Whether it's such belt-tightening, SARS scares, or lingering war and terrorism, marketing to tourists these days is a muddy business. Even though Philadelphia has weathered the travel slump better than other cities, concern is growing here about the summer travel season, usually one of the busiest.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To some airlines, what frequent business travelers want most are convenient schedules, no waiting in line to get on a plane, and a comfy seat up front in first class. Once the economy fully rebounds this fall or winter, the airlines' thinking goes, the cost of a ticket will be secondary to good service and the chance to earn lots of frequent-flier miles. Business for most airlines improved this summer because of healthy demand for vacation travel, leading some industry officials to believe that businesspeople - the carriers' bread and butter - will also be returning soon.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A business travel industry group on Friday urged the Transportation Security Administration to delay implementation of a new policy allowing passengers to carry knives onboard passenger aircraft. The Global Business Travel Association, whose 5,000 members manage more than $340 billion in business travel and meetings expenditures annually, said the new knife policy "raises significant safety concerns for business travelers who make nearly 40 million business trips each month. " The TSA policy shift to allow some small knives and other objects on flights is also opposed by pilot and flight-attendant groups.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
If city employees visit Colorado on business, they won't be getting reimbursed by the Rendell administration. Mayor Rendell yesterday issued an executive order banning business travel by city workers to the Rocky Mountain State because Colorado voters have approved a constitutional amendment denying some civil rights to homosexuals. When the mayor was in Chile two weeks ago, City Council approved a similar resolution to deny reimbursement. But Rendell said yesterday that his action had nothing to do with Council's action.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1993 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Analysts, academicians and a few travel-industry officials are warning that major advances in telecommunications could dramatically reduce the amount of business travel in the years ahead. Industry executives couldn't help noticing during the recession that business travel dropped sharply. Although it wasn't the major reason for the decline, experimentation with teleconferencing and video-conferencing was one factor. Teleconferencing involves hooking people in different locations into one conversation by telephone.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City Controller's Office has reviewed Philadelphia's two marketing agencies and concluded the city has one too many. A 38-page analysis found that lack of coordination, interagency friction, and administrative overlap between the city's two marketing arms was undercutting Philadelphia's ability to sell itself to visitors. Controller Alan Butkovitz recommended Tuesday that the city combine the two agencies - the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau (PHLCVB) and Visit Philadelphia - into a single entity.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert B. Logan Sr., 86, of Mount Airy, a business owner who savored summer road trips, died Wednesday, July 17, at Einstein Medical Center of complications from a stroke. Mr. Logan worked for an exterminating company before starting his own business, Robert Logan Exterminating Service, in 1960. The firm in Mount Airy offered exterminating and fumigating services to customers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. He never really retired. Prior to his work in extermination, Mr. Logan was an organizer for garment- and fishing-industry trade unions.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways Group and American Airlines have offered to give up a pair of landing and takeoff slots at London's Heathrow Airport to a competitor that would fly between Philadelphia and London. European Union antitrust regulators have one concern: that after the $11 billion merger of US Airways and American, the new American, as the airline will be called, could substantially hike airfares between London and Philadelphia. Why? The only other competition would be British Airways, which has a joint business agreement and financial stake in American's trans-Atlantic flights.
TRAVEL
July 14, 2013
Stop hiding from your friends. With this website, meet-ups just got easier, whether you're traveling the globe for business or pleasure. Name: MochaMeet.com What it does: Simplifies planning for group meet-ups around the world. What's hot: Enter a city and dates for your next trip. Then MochaMeet pulls data from your Facebook friends to let you know who will be near your destination. You can also add people by e-mail if they're not on Facebook. Click on the friends you want to invite, pick a date or dates if you want to offer a choice, and do the same for location.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
EXCUSE ME for bringing up a bad subject, but Monday is when you pay Uncle Sam what you owe in taxes. And tax experts say too many entrepreneurs often leave legitimate small-business tax deductions on the table. According to online publication Small Business Trends , there are 10 key deductions entrepreneurs should not overlook. 1. Health Care Tax Credit If you provide insurance to your workers under ObamaCare, you may be eligible to claim a tax credit of up to 35 percent, if certain criteria are met. 2. Business Use of Personal Car Use your personal vehicle for business purposes?
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A business travel industry group on Friday urged the Transportation Security Administration to delay implementation of a new policy allowing passengers to carry knives onboard passenger aircraft. The Global Business Travel Association, whose 5,000 members manage more than $340 billion in business travel and meetings expenditures annually, said the new knife policy "raises significant safety concerns for business travelers who make nearly 40 million business trips each month. " The TSA policy shift to allow some small knives and other objects on flights is also opposed by pilot and flight-attendant groups.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
With the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission's long-held reputation as a patronage haven, it comes as little surprise that top turnpike officials enjoy liberal expense accounts. Nor that hundreds of turnpike employees are allowed to cruise the toll road for free, even on personal trips. Even so, a just-released review by state Auditor General Jack Wagner should prompt needed reforms, especially at a time when other state and local government agencies are having to trim spending. In a 93-page audit covering a nearly five-year period, Wagner blasted what he called "overly generous and permissive" perks for the turnpike's five governing commissioners.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airlines are expected to post solid profits for the third quarter, with fuel prices edging lower. But analysts said they foresee that the industry could hit turbulence the last three months of the year, with business travel bookings softening as companies scale back because of the uncertain economy. Earnings reports will begin next week, with American Airlines reporting on Wednesday and Southwest Airlines Co. on Thursday. "We expect the nine major U.S. airlines to produce a solid third quarter," analyst Ray Neidl of Maxim Group L.L.C.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A top official of US Airways Group Inc. said Wednesday that demand for air travel could improve in the fourth quarter, as the public gets more clarity on the outcome of the U.S. elections and the fiscal cliff. Discretionary business travel to conferences and conventions has slowed, but "core business travel" has held up, Scott Kirby, president of Philadelphia's dominant airline, told an investor conference in New York. "Leisure-passenger demand remains strong," Kirby said, predicting that business travel would bounce back to March-April levels.
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