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NEWS
January 14, 1993 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This year's hotly contested race for mayor of Bensalem took off Tuesday when retired township farmer and businessman Joseph "Joey D" DiGirolamo announced his candidacy at his Hulmeville Road home. DiGirolamo, 55, a Republican and owner of D.G.'s Farms, ended months of speculation by entering the race to succeed GOP Mayor Edward F. Burns. Burns decided not to run for a second term. His first one expires at the end of the year. A former state representative, Burns became the first mayor of Bensalem in January 1990, when the township switched from a manager-supervisors system to a mayor-council form of government.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert Henn, 60, a businessman who loved running and climbing mountains, died of pancreatic cancer Thursday at his home in Penn Valley. Mr. Henn was born in Philadelphia and grew up in Drexel Hill. He graduated from Upper Darby High School and received a degree in mechanical engineering from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., in 1957. His daughter, Debbe Pavle, said that running was her father's passion. When he was 50, he ran in the New York City Marathon. He also enjoyed mountain climbing.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis Lieberman, 97, a businessman and former member of the Chester County Planning Commission, died of heart failure Wednesday at his home in Malvern. Mr. Lieberman worked as an insurance salesman and later as manager of a department store. He was active in the business community and in Democratic politics for 50 years. In the early 1940s, he was elected property tax assessor of Easttown when open fields and farms dominated the township. In the 1980s and 1990s, he served 15 years on the Chester County Planning Commission.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | By Alletta Emeno, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William L. Jacobs, 75, of Honey Brook, a retired insurance agency owner, died yesterday at the Coatesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center after a long illness. Mr. Jacobs lived in Elverson after graduating in 1946 from Muhlenberg College, where he received a degree in business administration. He was a native of Berks County. In the 1950s, he moved to Tucson, Ariz. where he lived for 41 years. Three years ago, he and his wife, Mildred, moved back to Chester County, becoming residents of the Tel Hai retirement community.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By David Raudenbush, Special to The Inquirer
Robert D. Starr, 62, of Mullica Hill, owner of Robert Starr Furniture, died Friday at Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury. Born in Lisburn, Pa., Mr. Starr was an Army medic during World War II. After serving a full apprenticeship with Upholsters International Local 77 of Philadelphia, he started his own business upholstering furniture in Woodbury in 1955. He moved the business to Mullica Hill in Harrison Township in 1969 and began selling carpeting and furniture. He phased out the upholstering business in 1979.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Skversky, 70, owner of a Philadelphia company that distributes fasteners, bolts and screws, died yesterday at the American Oncologic Hospital. A lifelong resident of the city, he lived in the Northeast. Mr. Skversky was a self-made man, his son, Jeffrey, recalled yesterday. He worked for another company "until he understood the business" and then started one of his own in the garage of his home. The business "just got bigger" with time, Jeffrey Skversky said, attributing the expansion to his father's "determination, hard work and charisma.
SPORTS
January 27, 2000 | By Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Theodore Francis Rutkowski, 64, a businessman who contributed to Phoenixville as a member of local civic groups, died Monday at Phoenixville Hospital. Mr. Rutkowski, a native of Bayonne, N.J., lived in Phoenixville for about 25 years. He had been president and a board member of the Poly Chem Corp. since 1995. Poly Chem, formerly part of the Budd Co., manufactures water-treatment systems in Phoenixville. "He was a fine man and not only an executive of this corporation, but he was very involved in the Phoenixville area," said William Crighton, vice president of Poly Chem, which employs about 100 people.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | By Edith L. Dixon, Special to The Inquirer
Michael M. Baccellieri, 76, president of Baccellieri Manufacturing Co. in Berlin, died Saturday at his daughter's home in Merion Station, Montgomery County. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Baccellieri moved to Haddonfield in 1964, and then to what had been his summer home in Margate in 1982. The firm Mr. Baccellieri served as president was founded in 1924 by his father, the late Raffaele Baccellieri. At one time the company was the largest producer of macaroni and wine presses, cheese graters and tomato processors.
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NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
As his family sees it, Mohammed Jabbateh is the very picture of an immigrant success story - a man who fled political turmoil in his native Liberia nearly two decades ago, and established a successful business in Philadelphia and a growing family in the suburbs. Prosecutors beg to differ. They say Jabbateh is hiding here, running from a past in which he led rebel commandos in acts of violence so horrific that a bridge bearing his nom de guerre - "Jungle Jabbah" - still stands in his home country at the site of a brutal attack.
NEWS
February 27, 2016 | By Brian X. McCrone, STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania businessman acquitted in a 2011 criminal case that involved a late-night drunken episode inside a hotel room is now suing the Ritz-Carlton near St. Louis where the bizarre incident took place. Daniel T. Hughes, 47, was on a business trip from Conshohocken to Clayton, Mo., when after a long night of drinking he got a key to the wrong room and climbed into bed with a 9-year-old girl. He was charged with child molestation and, three years later, acquitted. Now Hughes is suing the hotel and the company that runs it, Maritz, Wolff & Co., for negligence.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Valley Forge businessman Vincent Piazza has purchased a King of Prussia office building on an 18-acre site that may be further developed with housing and offices, commercial real estate services firm Newmark Grubb Knight Frank said in a release Monday. Piazza purchased the parcel at 1100 First Ave. from Devon Health Services, which has its headquarters there, said NGKF, which is marketing the space to potential tenants. Plans for the property include managing the existing building and exploring the development of a mixed-use project that could include professional or medical offices, homes, shopping and a hotel.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | George Will
"Experience teaches us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government's purposes are beneficent. "   - Louis Brandeis The impulse to ferret corruption from politics corrupts the criminal justice system when it causes overzealous prosecutors and judges to improvise novel interpretations of the law of bribery. Consider Robert McDonnell's case. Virginia's former Republican governor has been sentenced to prison for actions that he could not have reasonably anticipated would be declared felonies under a dangerous judicial expansion of federal law defining bribery of public officials.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
HOW MANY business owners are asked to take a position with their labor union? The fact that Edward E. Gardiner, president of the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Wilkes-Barre, was asked to serve as a trustee of Teamsters Local 401, which represented his employees, was indicative of how he and his fellow executives treated their workers. "Edward became known for his disciplined and fair business practices, and for his profound respect for his workers," his family said. Edward Ernst Gardiner, a direct descendant of the founder of the Schmidt Brewing Co., a Marine veteran, a master craftsman and a woodworker, and a devoted family man, died Dec. 26 after having a joyful Christmas with his family.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Staff Writer
Colin Caton Carpi, 84, of Penn Valley, a veteran, businessman and entrepreneur, died Thursday, Dec. 10, of progressive heart failure. Born and raised in the Philadelphia suburbs, he was a devoted father and grandfather who maintained lifelong curiosity, a love of learning, and optimism. "He was such an engaging human being. He always had a warm smile for everybody," said Jennifer Moller, his oldest child. "You saw him, he smiled, regardless of who the person was. " An honors graduate of the Haverford School, Princeton University, and Harvard Business School, Mr. Carpi was a voracious reader who delved into history, philosophy, physical sciences, religion, music and more, according to his family.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lenny Bazemore remembers heating pots of water on the stove to fill the bathtub. He remembers waiting his turn and bathing in dirty water. He remembers hunger. He remembers poverty. "We didn't have much, but we had love, we had family," Bazemore said. "We didn't have much, but we had each other. " On Thursday, Bazemore, 46, now a successful businessman, sought to honor the family of his childhood best friend, who lived across the street in Norristown. He had purchased the family's home after the parents died, planning to flip it for a profit.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN A STANDING-room-only courtroom yesterday, a federal judge sentenced a Southwest Philly automobile businessman to three years' probation in the Traffic Court ticket-fixing case. Henry Alfano, 69, known as "Eddie," got caught up in the scandal by using his longstanding connection to a then-retired Philadelphia Traffic Court judge, Fortunato Perri Sr., to get traffic tickets "fixed" for some of Alfano's friends and business associates. In exchange, prosecutors have said, Alfano gave Perri free seafood, porn videos and car repairs.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
While a member of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, one of the oldest military units in the United States, Charles Lee McIlvaine III raised his hand to help with almost anything. When President Richard Nixon visited Philadelphia in the 1970s, Mr. McIlvaine served as one of his body guards from the troop. He volunteered for the Vietnam War. He gave 39 years of service to the National Guard. "It was a big part of his life," said his wife of 45 years, Susan McIlvaine. "Charlie was just always there to help anybody who needed it. " Mr. McIlvaine, 71, of Wyndmoor, a devoted military member and a retired employee of the insurance and financial sectors, died Tuesday, Sept.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Expecting a $15 million windfall in September 2011 from a deal involving pre-IPO Facebook shares, Montgomery County businessman Timothy D. Burns agreed to buy a bayside house in Avalon for $4.6 million. When the Facebook deal did not happen as expected, Burns stole from clients of his money-management firm and another business to pay cash for the 4,380-square-foot house. Bad move. At Burns' sentencing hearing Monday in federal court in Philadelphia for the Avalon deal and other fraud totaling more than $19 million, U.S. District Court Judge Legrome D. Davis said he would give Burns credit for his role in the recent conviction of another fraudster, California-based Troy Stratos.
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