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Butch Cassidy

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NEWS
August 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHEYENNE, WYO. - Did Butch Cassidy, the notorious Old West outlaw who most historians believe died in a 1908 shootout in Bolivia, actually survive that battle and live to old age, peacefully and anonymously, in Washington state? And did he pen an autobiography detailing his exploits while cleverly casting the book as biography under another name? A rare-books collector says he has obtained a manuscript with new evidence that may give credence to that theory. The 200-page manuscript, Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy , which dates to 1934, is twice as long as a previously known but unpublished novella of the same title by William T. Phillips, a machinist who died in Spokane, Wash., in 1937.
NEWS
June 1, 1988
President Reagan is raising both eyebrows and ire by saying the same kinds of things about the Soviet system over there that he routinely says back here. Should we Americans feel embarrassed by our President's lack of tact? Should we feel concern that his pointed criticisms of human rights abuses are undermining Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the eyes of Kremlin hard-liners? The Guardian, a respected, left-of-center British newspaper, seems to think so. "Wittingly or not," it editorialized yesterday, "he reordered the priorities of the summit and kicked his host in the teeth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"BLACKTHORN" IS a sequel of sorts of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," but it's not a good time at the movies, like the original. "Blackthorn" takes the buddy movie outlaw mythology and glamour of the Newman-Redford classic and guts it like a fish. In its place is a bleak, violent, revisionist neo-"western" (shot in Bolivia), where an aged and fugitive Butch (Sam Shepard), now old and alone, thinks of making one last trip to the States. Wait . . . didn't Cassidy die at the hands of the Bolivian army?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Gunmen opens with a woman being buried alive by a vengeful drug baron. The movie that ensues is an exercise in pointless and often macabre violence that deserves an equally abrupt interment. Supervising the graveside service is none other than Patrick Stewart, who before he took command in Star Trek: The Next Generation, was a highly esteemed Shakespearean actor in Britain. His participation in Gunmen is undeniably a criminal waste of his time. If there is a governing idea behind Gunmen - and that's an extremely debatable question - it is to fuse themes and images from, among many other films, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre with Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. But a Treasure without Humphrey Bogart in front of the camera and John Huston behind it is pretty valueless, and a Butch Cassidy minus the chemistry of Paul Newman and Robert Redford turns into a worn formula.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At the climax of Where the Money Is, there's a dizzy plunge off a precipice, which serves as a reminder that there's a considerable falling off in quality between Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and Paul Newman's latest screen hustle. And none of that decline, we should hastily add, can be laid to Newman. At the age of 75, Newman continues to enjoy a wonderfully fertile autumn as an actor and a star whose presence and charisma seem embellished rather than dimmed by the passing years.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" is a goofy name for a movie, by any standard, but it makes a little more sense when you learn that it's a loose remake of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " What doesn't make sense is why anyone would remake "Butch Cassidy" by replacing Paul Newman and Robert Redford with Mickey Rourke and Don Johnson. It's a strong contrast in style and stature. One tandem comprises two of Hollywood's most enduring male stars, while the other comprises Mickey Rourke and Don Johnson.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
Paul Newman became a movie star by playing anti-heroes who bore little resemblance to the caring philanthropist and devoted husband that America now mourns. Newman died Friday at his home near Westport, Conn., after a long battle with cancer. He was 83. In films such as The Hustler, Hud, Cool Hand Luke, and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Newman played con artists and cads who used their masculine wiles to bed women and steal money. Playing an older, wiser "Fast Eddy Felson," his character in 1961's The Hustler, Newman won an Oscar in 1986 for his role in The Color of Money.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | The Associated Press, Life and Premiere magazines, USA Today, the Orange County Register, the New York Daily News and the New York Post contributed to this report
WILLIS-MOORE: RUMER CENTRAL Too bad bookies didn't try to lay odds on the name Bruce Willis and Demi Moore were going to choose for their newborn daughter. They would have become zillionaires. The name for the 8-pound, one-ounce baby is - ready? - Rumer Glenn. (Your guess is as good as ours.) The baby was born Tuesday morning in a Paducah, Ky., hospital. She was 21 1/2 inches long. Mom and baby are doing well. And Dad is already back at work, filming "In Country," a drama about Vietnam veterans.
SPORTS
August 30, 2010 | By Al Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Who ARE those guys?' That line, uttered by Paul Newman in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, referring to the mysterious posse that unerringly and relentlessly tracked him and Robert Redford across the country as they fled from the law, could well apply to this year's Atlanta Braves. Except the Braves aren't the ones doing the chasing. Not expected to make much of a dent before the season, the Braves have been looking more and more like the Atlanta of old, steadfastly clinging to the NL East lead as they try to win their first division title since 2005 in this, manager Bobby Cox's final season.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By Edward Kracz, Special to The Inquirer
In the movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Paul Newman (portraying Butch Cassidy) turns to Robert Redford (the Sundance Kid) while being relentlessly pursued by bounty hunters and asks, 'Who are those guys?' " Opponents of the Cardinal O'Hara girls' basketball team may have muttered Newman's line a few times themselves this season. The Lions became the new Catholic League South Division champs with their 51-46 win on Sunday afternoon over Archbishop Prendergast, the defending champion and this year's regular-season first-place finisher.
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SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Rick O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unless you're familiar with the Miami Dolphins of the early 1970s, you might not know why Plymouth Whitemarsh's Terry Brown and Corey Kelly are referred to as "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " For being one of the NFL's top rushing tandems and having contrasting running styles, Jim Kiick and Larry Csonka were nicknamed "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" after the popular movie starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford. As Kiick (Butch) and Csonka (Sundance) were for a 17-0 squad in 1972, Brown and Kelly are a productive one-two rushing punch for the 9-1 Colonials.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"BLACKTHORN" IS a sequel of sorts of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," but it's not a good time at the movies, like the original. "Blackthorn" takes the buddy movie outlaw mythology and glamour of the Newman-Redford classic and guts it like a fish. In its place is a bleak, violent, revisionist neo-"western" (shot in Bolivia), where an aged and fugitive Butch (Sam Shepard), now old and alone, thinks of making one last trip to the States. Wait . . . didn't Cassidy die at the hands of the Bolivian army?
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHEYENNE, WYO. - Did Butch Cassidy, the notorious Old West outlaw who most historians believe died in a 1908 shootout in Bolivia, actually survive that battle and live to old age, peacefully and anonymously, in Washington state? And did he pen an autobiography detailing his exploits while cleverly casting the book as biography under another name? A rare-books collector says he has obtained a manuscript with new evidence that may give credence to that theory. The 200-page manuscript, Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy , which dates to 1934, is twice as long as a previously known but unpublished novella of the same title by William T. Phillips, a machinist who died in Spokane, Wash., in 1937.
SPORTS
August 30, 2010 | By Al Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Who ARE those guys?' That line, uttered by Paul Newman in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, referring to the mysterious posse that unerringly and relentlessly tracked him and Robert Redford across the country as they fled from the law, could well apply to this year's Atlanta Braves. Except the Braves aren't the ones doing the chasing. Not expected to make much of a dent before the season, the Braves have been looking more and more like the Atlanta of old, steadfastly clinging to the NL East lead as they try to win their first division title since 2005 in this, manager Bobby Cox's final season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are Hollywood legends. Then there's Paul Newman. With more than 80 film and TV roles to his credit, Newman, who died in September 2008 at 83, starred in some of Hollywood's most enduring productions. The consummate leading man, family man, racing man, and man's man, Newman also was a celebrated philanthropist whose Newman's Own food line supported numerous charities. The actor's career is celebrated in the new 17-disc DVD set, Paul Newman: The Tribute Collection, from Fox (www.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
Paul Newman became a movie star by playing anti-heroes who bore little resemblance to the caring philanthropist and devoted husband that America now mourns. Newman died Friday at his home near Westport, Conn., after a long battle with cancer. He was 83. In films such as The Hustler, Hud, Cool Hand Luke, and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Newman played con artists and cads who used their masculine wiles to bed women and steal money. Playing an older, wiser "Fast Eddy Felson," his character in 1961's The Hustler, Newman won an Oscar in 1986 for his role in The Color of Money.
NEWS
September 28, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If you're looking for a dozen of Paul Newman's best, you'd want to start here: The Long, Hot Summer (1958) - Newman and Joanne Woodward blaze up the screen for the first time in this fiery, Southern-fried Faulkner adaptation. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) - "Jump off the roof, Maggie, jump off it!" says tormented ex-football hero Newman to his restless missus Liz Taylor, in the bold but bowdlerized Metrocolor version of Tennessee Williams' dysfunctional family saga. The Hustler (1961)
NEWS
September 28, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Paul Newman, 83, the Hollywood icon with the famous blue eyes and killer grin who seduced audiences with six decades worth of rebels, rascals and moody romancers, died Friday after a battle with cancer. He died in the farmhouse in Westport, Conn., where he lived with his wife, Joanne Woodward - his costar in life and in 10 of his movies - at his side, along with other family members. Mr. Newman, who also pursued politics and race cars and his philanthropic foodstuffs company with a passion, was an actor who radiated such easygoing, wily charm that it was virtually impossible to dislike the characters he played, even when they were selfish heels, shallow pretty boys, con men, or drunks - and they often were.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
AS HAS LONG BEEN speculated, 83-year-old Paul Newman is battling cancer, his longtime neighbor and business partner, A.E. Hotchner said yesterday. Hotchner, who partnered with Newman to start Newman's Own salad dressing company in the 1980s, said that Newman told him about the disease about 18 months ago. "It's a form of cancer and he's dealing with it," Hotchner told the Associated Press. Newman appeared to have lost weight during practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2002 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the few sure things about tomorrow night's Academy Awards ceremony is that an honorary Oscar will go to Robert Redford. This is amazing twice: Redford, fiercely independent, has made it clear over the years that he despises the moviemaking establishment and prefers the mountains of Utah to the hills of Hollywood. Redford, along with actor Sidney Poitier, is being honored for lifetime achievement, which means the Sundance Kid is no longer a kid. In August, he'll be 65, able to collect Social Security.
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