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Butcher

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FOOD
January 29, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
Finding an old-fashioned butcher is becoming a bit difficult, to say the least. Finding a good, old-fashioned butcher, one who ages his beef, makes his own sausage and cuts steaks as thick or as thin as you like, is even more difficult. But finding a butcher who has turned his trade into an art form is rare indeed. Henri Lapuyade is that rare breed of butcher. I have known Henri for years, as one knows an artist, through his work. In my opinion, Marcel et Henri makes the finest line of pates, terrines and galantines in America today.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Wearing a white cotton apron marked with light pinkish smears, 29-year-old Dave Strommer hones the 8-inch knife across a sharpening steel. Deftly, he cuts a strip of sirloin tip into neat cubes, sweeping the meat into a pile nearby. "I'm making boeuf bourguignon," said Strommer, owner of Dave's Old Fashioned Butcher Shop, 362 West Lancaster Ave., Wayne. A blond, slim, mustachioed man, belying the caricature of an old, robust, gray-haired butcher, Strommer works to fill a customer's request.
FOOD
April 5, 2013 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Angela Chase, 18, in a pastel butterfly top and rhinestone glasses, doesn't look entirely comfortable wielding a giant bone saw over a bisected pig carcass. But on a recent Sunday, at a "Be Your Own Butcher" class at Wyebrook Farm in Chester County, instructor Janet Crandall coaxed Chase to use a smooth, confident, back-and-forth motion to cut through a bone. Tentatively, Chase worked the saw, struggling for a few long minutes as other students called out instructions and encouragement.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
RE CHRISTINE FLOWERS' op-ed on the execution of Saddam Hussein, "Justice was served": Ms. Flowers begins her justification for the "revenge" killing by discussing philosophical ideals - "And for a moment, the people of Iraq had a glimpse of hope. " She says "some cosmic balance had been restored. " She speaks of misguided mercy by the likes of the pope, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. Then she finishes her article with her view that "Revenge might not be sweet.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Neil Coulter, whose longevity was attributed to his ability not to worry, died Sunday at the age of 108. Coulter, of Upper Darby, Delaware County, was raised on a farm near Milford, Del., and came to Philadelphia when he was about 15. He found work in neighborhood grocery stores on Woodland Avenue and eventually became a skilled butcher. His son, Richard Coulter, said that in his father's day, before the unions got organized, 72-hour work weeks were common and necessary to make a living wage.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | By Herb Drill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mario P. Donato, 81, of Willow Grove and formerly of Abington, a retired butcher who fought in several major World War II campaigns, including the Battle of the Bulge, died of cancer Saturday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Donato was born in Abington and graduated from Abington High School in 1937. During World War II, he served in the Army as a staff sergeant with the 80th Infantry Division. He was involved in fighting in the Ardennes and the Rhineland as well as the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | By Bonnie Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Florence Zebrowski, 87, who along with her husband, Witold, owned and operated W. Zebrowski's Butchers & Grocers in Camden for 68 years, died Friday at Red Oak Manor at the Lakeland Health Complex in Gloucester Township. Shortly after they married, the Zebrowskis took over the butcher store from her parents, who started the business at the turn of the century, said Mrs. Zebrowski's grandson, Mark McEvoy. After her husband's death in 1963, Mrs. Zebrowski operated the store alone.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neil Coulter, an Upper Darby butcher who worked long hours, enjoyed quiet time with his family and believed the secret to his longevity was his refusal to worry, died Monday at 108 years of age at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. Mr. Coulter had started in the food business as a teenager, moving to West Philadelphia from his home town of Milford, Del., and taking a job as a grocery boy. It wasn't long before he found his lifelong work as a butcher - a job he didn't quit until he was 78. "Years ago, he used to work all week long and come home with 10 or 15 dollars and a couple of pieces of meat," said his son, Richard.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1991 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bitter legal dispute between Philadelphia businessman Howard Butcher 4th and his former partner in a Denver mining company has taken a new direction - fresh on the heels of a major court defeat for the partner. DRX Inc., the gold-exploration and mining firm, has filed suit seeking to recover more than $200,000 in company funds that it says the partner, Robert A. Clarke, used for personal expenses. The lawsuit comes after Clarke sought unsuccessfully in court to regain control of DRX Inc. On Feb. 1, a federal judge in Delaware dismissed Clarke's contention that his removal as president and a director of DRX had been illegal and improper.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 29, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Reader: Where is the best Indian food in Philly? Any good options for regular takeout? Craig LaBan: There are a couple more obvious options, like Indeblue and Tiffin. But I find the best authentic Indian food to be in the far western 'burbs, at places like Indian Hut, Bangles, Devi. Recently, though, I've also had good luck at a few spots in town. Try the stylish new Chaat & Chai in South Philly, a colorful small-plater dedicated to street foods, something different, with some modern presentations of South Indian cooking.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
In the language of its business, Rastelli Foods Group's evolution is akin to going from ground chuck to kobe strip steaks, from bacon to Iberico ham. Rastelli's is a 40-year story of improvisation and capitalizing on opportunity - and proof that foreign trade is accessible even to a couple of New Jersey brothers who reached adulthood without ever having been on an airplane. What began as a butcher shop in Deptford in 1976, founded by an 18-year-old who needed to quickly find a means to support his wife and a child on the way, is now an international conglomerate of 825 employees and more than $500 million in annual revenue.
FOOD
November 26, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In the great burger discussion, the emphasis lately usually focuses on designer meat, whether it's from a famous butcher, a special grind technique, or an exotic added fat. Kensington Quarters, which grinds its grass-fed, fat-forward beef daily from the whole cow that's cut up weekly at the in-house butcher shop, certainly has a special beef to tout, with a mineral richness that is beefy at its amplified best. But what chef Damon Menapace also understands that many cooks don't is that a truly special burger requires great packaging, too. So when KQ finally conceded recently to add a burger, both as a more affordable overture to its Fishtown neighbors and a signature move for its new lunch menu, he went about baking the ideal bun. This "pain au lait" (milk-based bread)
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News Staff Writer
AT KENSINGTON Quarters, it's never too early to start talking product. It's the first thing Heather Thomason and Damon Menapace address when they show up in the morning - after coffee, obviously. In many ways, they're no different from any other pair of well-caffeinated co-workers, but the manner of their on-the-job relationship is distinct. Thomason, a butcher, heads up the team milling about the meat-stuffed refrigerator case situated at the very front of the Fishtown restaurant, bar and meat shop, which opened last fall.
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - It can be hard out there for a lifeguard. So when someone like Rich "Rich the Butcher" Hill shows up at the Jetty, fires up the Weber, and starts passing up bacon burgers to the Beach Patrol members on the lifeguard stand - and we're talking custom burgers where the bacon is blended into the mix - legendary status is immediately bestowed. Rich the Butcher, 56-year-old owner of the Colonial Village Meat Market in West Chester, has very much earned most-honored-shoobie status at the Jetty, a drive-on south-end beach in Brigantine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Tiffany Labhen unfurls a bolt of ivory satin on her work table, carefully smooths the pattern over the fabric, and starts measuring. She's trying to determine how wide she should make her trumpet skirt's seam allowance - an important detail of a well-made garment, because without this extra room, future alterations are all but impossible. "I'm learning everything that goes into an evening gown," said Labhen, a 26-year-old customer-service rep by day and creator of formfitting women's wear line TieNel Fashion by night.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six years ago, a 21-year-old Gettysburg College senior named Kevin Schaeffer, from outside Reading, spent the evening with Amy Butcher, a close friend and fellow senior from Telford, Bucks County. They drank at a bar, and talked about their impending graduation and what would come next. He walked her back to her apartment. Then, he went home and stabbed his ex-girlfriend, 19-year-old Emily Silverstein, 27 times. Now, Butcher, 28, an assistant professor of English at Ohio Wesleyan University, has written a memoir, Visiting Hours (Blue Rider Press)
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The Philadelphia Montessori Charter School is housed in a former city rec center on the corner of Island and Saybrook Avenues in Southwest Philadelphia. The grand, weathered old brick building has been retrofitted into a thriving elementary school for about 170 children, mostly from the neighborhood. The kindergarten classroom there, equipped with nothing but a sink and a convection microwave oven, serves as a teaching kitchen for after-school cooking classes twice a week. The sixth graders squeeze into chairs meant for children half their age, prepping and measuring ingredients at the tiny classroom table to prepare easy, healthy dinners from the My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederick Messerschmitt, 90, of Gloucester City, a former Philadelphia butcher and South Jersey motorcycle club president, died Monday, Jan. 5, at home. Mr. Messerschmitt grew up on a cattle ranch in Nevada, was home-schooled, and ran away to join the Army when he was 17. He was in the second wave of the Normandy invasion on D-Day, but he was never certain whether he landed on Omaha Beach or Utah Beach because "there was a lot of confusion and miscommunication," son Karl said.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, Heather Thomason was living in Brooklyn, N.Y., working in graphic design and spending her off-hours at farmers' markets and food co-ops to fuel her cooking habit. "People asked me did I wish that I worked in food, because I was always talking about food and always cooking," she says. Now - three years and one radical career change later - she's a butcher and manager at Kensington Quarters, the new restaurant, bar, and butcher shop in Fishtown that specializes in carving up whole animals sustainably raised on local farms.
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