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Butcher Shop

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NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
Last summer, it appeared that the Reading Terminal Market and one of its oldest and most historic tenants, the 105-year-old Harry G. Ochs & Sons butcher shop, had reached a truce in what had become a public dispute over rent. Apparently it didn't last long. The general manager of the popular Center City market and food court, Paul Steinke, said this week that the market had filed a complaint in Common Pleas Court seeking back rent from the butcher shop, which has been owned by son Nicholas Ochs since Harry Ochs died in December 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2000 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
John Cancelliere remembers the early '60s when his family, then in Argentina, started in the restaurant business. "We used to take over butcher shops, fish shops and convert them to restaurants. " So when he and his son, Pascual, opened the shuttered Frank Giunta's butcher shop at Ninth and Christian as a restaurant, unlike many of us, he didn't view it as such a novel idea. "We just thought it was a great idea. Nothing scientific to it. We just did it. " Butcher's Cafe brings Cancelliere back to the neighborhood where he began his local restaurant career with Cafe Longano, in late 1987.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's still an unsettling sight, even for a man who has been a butcher all his life. So Jack Foresta, 70, still winces a little when he steps over the dark red stain on the sidewalk leading to the walk-in cooler outside his meat market. Inside, the view isn't any softer. More than 30 deer hang from their haunches. One is spread out waiting to be cleaned. Fifteen deer heads piled in the far right corner create a collage of glossy eyes, open mouths and antlers. Eventually, a few of the heads will be mounted on living-room walls.
LIVING
April 6, 1994 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Japanese planes bombed Pearl Harbor, plunging the United States into World War II, Ray Doyle of Philadelphia enlisted in his country's defense - as a can-smasher. It was important work for a 5-year-old. "We collected tin cans and stamped them - crushed 'em, flattened 'em - and piled them up in the local air-raid warden's garage," Doyle, now a West Chester University professor, recalls. "We were told that we were helping to build weapons. " All over America, from 1941 to 1945, children contributed to the war effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012
WORKING WITH a savvy butcher has its advantages. "At a supermarket, you get what you get," said chef Derek Davis, owner of Derek's in Manayunk. Davis owned a boutique butcher shop, Main Line Prime, before the economy tanked. "If you want your steaks cut thick, your chicken boned, your roast tied, the butcher can do. It's all about the service. " Here's what a good butcher can do for you: 1. Save you money. That's right. While you may pay more per pound for some cuts, you'll be surprised at how competitive most butcher-shop prices are. And a good butcher can save you money by steering you toward cheaper cuts.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Marjorie Keen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A county pharmaceutical company is ready to produce an over-the-counter drug based on one of Dr. Mom's favorite home remedies - chicken soup. At a zoning hearing in Highland Township last week, David Lee, the production manager for ABS LifeSciences, said the company planned to grind and cook about 4,000 pounds of chicken feet each week in a former butcher shop on Racetrack Road. ABS workers will strain the broth and then cool it until it jells. At the end of a month, Lee said, the product will be shipped to Middlesex, N.J., for spray-drying in a plant that also dries Campbell's dehydrated soups.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Colonial Beef Co., a meatpacking company based in the Food Distribution Center in South Philadelphia, yesterday signed a joint venture agreement with a Japanese firm that will expand distribution of its American beef products in Japan. Naigai Beef Co. Ltd. of Osaka, Japan, will become a 50-50 partner in Colonial Beef under the terms of the accord, said Colonial Beef president Ron Davis. Louis Waxman, who was Colonial's president, assumes the post of chairman under the terms of the accord.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Colonial Beef Co., a meatpacking company based in the Food Distribution Center in South Philadelphia, yesterday signed a joint venture agreement with a Japanese firm that will expand distribution of its American beef products in Japan. Naigai Beef Co. Ltd. of Osaka, Japan, will become a 50-50 partner in Colonial Beef under the terms of the accord, said Colonial Beef president Ron Davis. Louis Waxman, who was Colonial's president, assumes the post of chairman under the terms of the accord.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Marjorie Keen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The preservationists had their turn Wednesday to tell Highland Township's Zoning Board exactly why they opposed a drug manufacturing plant in a farming area. Not only were they concerned about the quality and quantity of their well water and the commercial traffic on country roads, they said, they were afraid as well that allowing one industry to puncture the agriculture zone would set an undesirable precedent. "I'm worried about this company's picking up and leaving. And having it now zoned industrial, somebody else could come in, and we won't know what they would do," said Stuart Malone, chairman of the Planning Commission.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugenio "Gene" Gagliardi, 90, who left his native Italy in 1922 with less than $20 in his pocket and built a local meat processing business that he eventually sold for $20 million, died Saturday at Lankenau Hospital. He was a resident of Lower Merion Township. "He was a self-made person," his son Ralph said. "He made the most of the opportunity he was given in this country. His work ethic was unbelievable. " Mr. Gagliardi transformed Gagliardi Bros., a family butcher shop in West Philadelphia, into a meat processing plant whose products included Steak-Umms, a frozen, wafer-thin sandwich steak.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, Heather Thomason was living in Brooklyn, N.Y., working in graphic design and spending her off-hours at farmers' markets and food co-ops to fuel her cooking habit. "People asked me did I wish that I worked in food, because I was always talking about food and always cooking," she says. Now - three years and one radical career change later - she's a butcher and manager at Kensington Quarters, the new restaurant, bar, and butcher shop in Fishtown that specializes in carving up whole animals sustainably raised on local farms.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are investigating an incident of anti-Semitic vandalism in which swastikas were painted on the outside of a butcher store in Northeast Philadelphia. The owner of Simon's Kosher, on the 6900 block of Bustleton Avenue, discovered several swastikas painted on the outside of the store around 8:22 a.m. Thursday, police said. The symbols were painted in red on the storefront and on the rear of the building, police said. Detectives are investigating. Police said no similar incidents had been reported in the area recently.
FOOD
January 2, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
The crystal ball for the 2014 Philadelphia-area restaurant scene shows assorted bright spots: a Jose Garces restaurant where he himself will cook, a Marc Vetri project at the Navy Yard, George Sabatino's solo debut in Rittenhouse, a Mexican restaurant in Rittenhouse, a few brewpubs, a restaurant within a butcher shop, two vegan bars, a locavore-themed bar-restaurant for Washington Square West, and Spike Mendelsohn's Good Stuff Eatery . ...
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas D. Buono began to learn butchering before he could reach over the counter. "When he was 4 years old, he would stand on a box" at his father's butcher shop near 10th and Wolf Streets in South Philadelphia, his wife, Joan, said. Mr. Buono's father would give him scraps and the child "would cut meat for the customers who wanted it for a dog or a cat. " "You didn't have cat food like they have today," she said. On Friday, Aug. 9, Mr. Buono, 81, of Cherry Hill, co-owner of Buono's Restaurant in Sea Isle City, N.J., from 1978 to 1997, died of heart failure at Virtua Marlton medical center.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
WITH ALL the concern these days over where our food comes from, relationships between chefs and farmers, long limited to brisk phone calls and backdoor deliveries, have taken on a new air of transparency. It's commonplace to find growers and purveyors name-dropped on Philly restaurant menus, and many city dwellers know their producers by face and name thanks to meet-greet-and-eats, such as weekly farmers markets. Locally, few places present the chance to see this one-to-one realized better than Honey Brook's Wyebrook Farm, which former bond trader Dean Carlson acquired in 2010.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR ISABELLE CELLINI, her work in the gift shop of the Shrine of St. Rita of Cascia was more than just selling things. It was a kind of ministry. "People would have really heartbreaking stories to tell," said the Rev. Joseph Genito, pastor of St. Rita's, in South Philadelphia. "They would be ready to talk to her. For her, it was a way to share the values of St. Rita, a reconciler, a healer, a peacemaker. " Besides her compassionate desire to help people, Isabelle was a crackerjack sales person.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012
WORKING WITH a savvy butcher has its advantages. "At a supermarket, you get what you get," said chef Derek Davis, owner of Derek's in Manayunk. Davis owned a boutique butcher shop, Main Line Prime, before the economy tanked. "If you want your steaks cut thick, your chicken boned, your roast tied, the butcher can do. It's all about the service. " Here's what a good butcher can do for you: 1. Save you money. That's right. While you may pay more per pound for some cuts, you'll be surprised at how competitive most butcher-shop prices are. And a good butcher can save you money by steering you toward cheaper cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012 | By Beth D'Addono, FOR THE DAILY NEWS
OLD-SCHOOL is always in session at G&M Market in Glendora, a South Jersey town not far from the Deptford Mall. Master butcher and raconteur Hank Mariotti just celebrated 55 years at the family-run business, an old-fashioned butcher shop and deli that still makes homemade sausage and grinds and cuts meat to order. For customers with no time to cook, beef and pork are roasted fresh daily for sandwiches, and the hoagies and sandwiches are some of the best around. As he approaches his 80th birthday, Mariotti, who co-owns the business with his son Gary, still works seven days a week.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Bender, 70, the world-renowned forensic sculptor whose hand-molded busts of unidentified murder victims and aging killers helped to crack cold cases, died Thursday at his home in Southwest Center City. His most famous case involved John List, a New Jersey man who killed his family in 1971 and then disappeared. The producers of Fox's America's Most Wanted asked Mr. Bender to create a bust of List showing what he might look like 18 years later. A Virginia woman watching the show recognized the bust as her neighbor.
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | By ALBERT STUMM, stumma@phillynews.com 215-854-5128
Her life was on the line, and in one moment, there was an opportunity to run. It didn't take long for her to get caught, but in the end, that break for freedom saved her hide - literally. Nearly a week after bolting from an Upper Darby slaughterhouse, a cow has been spared, destined to spend the rest of her life in a New York animal sanctuary. "Certainly, a cow that escapes its death and is running for its life and makes it out of a slaughterhouse facility is worth saving," said Elissa Katz, an animal-rights maven working on behalf of Animal ACTivists of Philly, which led the charge to save the cow. The deal was made only after Katz connected with a Muslim-rights group to work on behalf of the butcher shop, and both got the state Department of Agriculture to waive regulations forbidding the sale of animals bound for slaughter, and other rules.
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