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Butcher

NEWS
September 5, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
As veteran readers of this newspaper might recall, our guy Frank Dougherty has done much valuable work in helping to bring Nazi war criminals to justice. Last spring, Dougherty and I spent 3 1/2 hours on that subject, as guests on Frank Ford's WDVT talk program. "Wasn't 3 1/2 hours a little hard to handle?" someone asked Docko when he got back to the newsroom. "Of course," he admitted. "But that's all the time we had!" Obviously, Frank Dougherty has a lot more to say about Nazi war criminals.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | By Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He is the high priest of an autumn ritual. At his corner in Harrowgate, a city neighborhood of rowhouses and working people, Siegfried Karnas waits for the men to return from the woods. They come at all hours, bursting into his shop, jangling the wind chimes that dangle from the tiny pagoda hooked to the top of the door. Hunters victorious, they lay their deer at the feet of Karnas, master butcher. During the two weeks of buck-hunting season, which ends at sundown tomorrow, and the three-day doe season, which begins Monday, Karnas works day and night, turning deer into venison steaks, chops and sausage.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Michelle R. Davis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Walking into Tom's Market is like entering a time machine, stuck somewhere in past decades. Shelves are sparsely stocked with dusty cans of coffee, sardines, lupini beans and grape jelly in the dim, one-room grocery store. A white display case that once revealed cuts of fresh pork, beef and whole chickens now shows only a motley assortment of mystery meats. An antiquated cooler that held ice-cream bars and colored popsicles for generations of neighborhood kids makes a constant background rumble.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The palest of morning suns is just over the hump of Tussey Mountain. Gales of snow are whipping across the country lane in the subzero temperature. And the tattered green farmhouse is dripping with two-foot icicles. But clouds of steam already are piling into the frigid air from the outdoor scalding trough and the cast-iron cooking kettles. A dozen cars are crammed in the snow just beyond Herb Rudy's barn. And Rudy, with his knife, and Jake Wheeland, with his .22 rifle, are up in the pig pen trying to corner another pig. Here in the frost-bound valley between Tussey and Bald Eagle Mountains, in the frozen heart of a central Pennsylvania winter, the 137-acre Rudy farm is alive this morning with friends and relations, with corny jokes and spat tobacco juice, with steaming cinnamon rolls and sawed-up hogs.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dean Bozman had already shown his stuffed bear, his freeze-dried birds, the big ol' bison head, and his eyeball collection, but he paused in front of the fridge. "I don't know, I don't want to offend you," he told a visitor last week, and he meant it. After some reassurance, Bozman, 46, gave the handle a yank, and the galvanized door of his walk-in cooler swung wide open. Entwined on the floor, their eyes wide, their legs stiff, their innards still cooling, lay two dead deer.
NEWS
September 4, 2008 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, Celeste Morello hawked her slim paperback, The Philadelphia Italian Market Cookbook: The Tastes of South 9th Street, through a profit-sharing deal with a Ninth Street butcher, periodic signings beneath a banner on the street, and bookstores across the city. Copies sold to date: 25,000. But beginning in July, says Morello, the butcher suddenly stopped carrying the book, some market merchants seemed to shun her, and her taste of South Ninth Street turned increasingly bitter.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
SPEAKING of disarming dangerous thugs, would U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix please visit North Philadelphia next? Even the French might agree that Philadelphia's in-house drug dealers are in material breach of local gun laws - possessing weapons of crass destruction like the whopping-big Israeli-made Desert Eagle handgun likely used to wound sleeping 12-year-old Jonathan Quintana last weekend. If we're willing to send a quarter of a million troops to free the Iraqis from the Butcher of Baghdad, we ought to be willing to free our own neighborhoods from Saddam's spiritual cousins, like the Butcher of Berks Street.
FOOD
September 18, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent weeks, some voters may have acquired a curiosity, if not a taste, for moose - after hearing that Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has stalked, shot, skinned and stewed moose. That may sound like a startling achievement to urbanites, though I'm not certain it bears much relevance to her vice-presidential qualifications. But there are women in other parts of the country who hunt moose for the meat - using either bows or rifles. And that got me thinking - What if I wanted to put myself to the moose test?
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
POLICE ARRESTED a SEPTA passenger and confiscated four BB guns, ammunition, two large butcher knives and a meat cleaver he carried with him Monday night as he rode the Broad Street Line. Darryl Donahue, 52, of Germantown, told officers he had the weapons for protection, SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said. He was riding the Broad Street Line north when a passenger noticed the "telltale bulge" of a gun in his waistband, took his photo with her smartphone and alerted police, Nestel said.
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles J. Giunta Sr., 87, the third-generation owner of an Italian Market butcher shop that opened in the early 1900s and closed in the 1980s, died Wednesday, Aug. 22, of heart failure at his South Philadelphia home. The family at one time also owned a wholesale slaughterhouse in South Philadelphia and a pig farm in Deptford, Gloucester County, and in the 1980s spawned the butcher shops of two sons now in the Reading Terminal Market. Until this week, Mr. Giunta was a daily presence at the market, where son Charles operates Giunta's Prime Shop and son Martin runs Martin's Quality Meats & Sausages.
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