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Butcher

NEWS
September 4, 2008 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, Celeste Morello hawked her slim paperback, The Philadelphia Italian Market Cookbook: The Tastes of South 9th Street, through a profit-sharing deal with a Ninth Street butcher, periodic signings beneath a banner on the street, and bookstores across the city. Copies sold to date: 25,000. But beginning in July, says Morello, the butcher suddenly stopped carrying the book, some market merchants seemed to shun her, and her taste of South Ninth Street turned increasingly bitter.
FOOD
July 1, 2016 | By Barry Zukerman, Staff Writer
When we think of beef short ribs, what generally comes to mind is the large boneless variety served braised in restaurants, or the crosscut ribs with three or four small pieces of bone in them that are found on supermarket shelves and in butcher display cases. But a mouthwatering photo of beef ribs on the cover of a barbecue cookbook recently brought back memories of the monstrous rack of Montreal-style smoked short ribs my party ordered at Abe Fisher, and the dinosaur bone I polished off at Fette Sau. As the Fourth of July approached, with a long weekend for a cooking project, I began my short ribs research for that very cut: I discovered that the most desirable cut for smoking (and the cut served at Abe Fisher and Fette Sau)
NEWS
March 13, 2003
SPEAKING of disarming dangerous thugs, would U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix please visit North Philadelphia next? Even the French might agree that Philadelphia's in-house drug dealers are in material breach of local gun laws - possessing weapons of crass destruction like the whopping-big Israeli-made Desert Eagle handgun likely used to wound sleeping 12-year-old Jonathan Quintana last weekend. If we're willing to send a quarter of a million troops to free the Iraqis from the Butcher of Baghdad, we ought to be willing to free our own neighborhoods from Saddam's spiritual cousins, like the Butcher of Berks Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Tiffany Labhen unfurls a bolt of ivory satin on her work table, carefully smooths the pattern over the fabric, and starts measuring. She's trying to determine how wide she should make her trumpet skirt's seam allowance - an important detail of a well-made garment, because without this extra room, future alterations are all but impossible. "I'm learning everything that goes into an evening gown," said Labhen, a 26-year-old customer-service rep by day and creator of formfitting women's wear line TieNel Fashion by night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
On the cover of the latest issue of "The Boys," No. 14, Butcher - the star of the book - is standing in a virtual river of blood and covered with quite a bit of it. Which is appropriate, since "The Boys" has quite a bit of violence, and scenes that are not for the squeamish. It is also not for those who have a problem with comics depicting nudity or sexual situations. Or those who don't like profanity, since the characters - especially Butcher - use it frequently. Finally, if you consider yourself to be politically correct, you probably won't enjoy the terms and situations in "The Boys" that are practically guaranteed to offend, well, just about everyone.
FOOD
December 7, 1988 | By Merle Ellis, Special to the Daily News
Not many years ago - certainly no further back than when Grandma was a girl - the butcher played a totally different role in the consumer's marketing experience. In those days, you could go to the meat counter, recipe in hand, and ask your friendly butcher, "What's the best cut to use for beef Bourguignon?" or "How long should I cook a three-rib prime rib?" and if he knew anything about his trade, he could tell you. And if you had six kids and your husband was out of work, the butcher probably knew that too. And there would always be some cut of meat that was "a real good special today.
FOOD
January 10, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
The meat cases at Sonny D'Angelo's singular butcher shop were half-empty and a bit of a mess one day last week in the languor of postholiday Ninth Street. The lardo was buried under a slab of double-smoked bacon, and some sausage trays lacked for labels, though you could make out the hand-scrawled sign for a pumpkiny pork sausage (with bourbon and walnuts), a feature of one of his claims to fame - the meticulously artisan, labor-intensive, bread-free turducken. Business had been robust before New Year's, he said, with his seven-fishes sausage to make, his exotic game to pitch.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One week after Lower Merion Committeeman Mac Butcher received the Republican endorsement for the 149th Legislative District, the Upper Merion Republican Committee donated $1,000 to unendorsed favorite-son candidate Fiore Vagnozzi. "We had decided we were going to back Mr. Vagnozzi, no matter what," said Wanda M. Smith, campaign chairperson for the Upper Merion Republican Committee. "It is time Upper Merion got recognized. We are always being ruled by someone from the Main Line.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | The Editorial Board
ANY MINUTE now, Baghdad will fall. With any luck, Saddam will be falling with it - if he isn't already dead. As we all wait for the news, here's a do-it-yourself project to help pass the time: The Saddam Flip Book. Just carefully cut out each drawing of Saddam (courtesy of our own Signe Wilkinson) and staple them together on left side. Then quickly thumb through the pages and watch as the Butcher of Baghdad magically gets his just reward.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
POLICE ARRESTED a SEPTA passenger and confiscated four BB guns, ammunition, two large butcher knives and a meat cleaver he carried with him Monday night as he rode the Broad Street Line. Darryl Donahue, 52, of Germantown, told officers he had the weapons for protection, SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said. He was riding the Broad Street Line north when a passenger noticed the "telltale bulge" of a gun in his waistband, took his photo with her smartphone and alerted police, Nestel said.
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