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Butcher

FOOD
December 17, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
The lights were off at the butcher stall (No. 620-616) at the heart of the Reading Terminal Market, the meat cases as empty as a waiting tomb. It has been here since 1906, and rarely - and certainly few times in recent memory - have those lights been off during business hours, or those cases been empty. This was (it still is, in fact) Harry G. Ochs Prime Meats, and in the dim light early Monday the tools of its trade were still easily visible - meat hooks overhead like so many rhino horns, and stubby-legged butcher's blocks (three of them)
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
There was the "Great Turkey Rush of 1944," when seven shoppers fainted and police and firemen were called out to maintain order. There was the time that Bassett's Ice Cream created borsht (beet)-flavored ice cream for visiting Russian Premier Nikita Khrushchev. There was the auto tycoon who had a special train deliver his weekly grocery order from the Reading Terminal Market to his Maryland farm. Perhaps no other Philadelphia institution is as steeped in tradition and history as the Reading Terminal Market.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
A federal judge in Nashville yesterday sentenced bankrupt financier C. H. Butcher Jr. to 20 years in prison for banking practices that prosecutors say bilked thousands of people of their life savings. Butcher, whose family once held a banking dynasty stretching across Tennessee and Kentucky, stood motionless as U.S. District Judge Thomas A. Higgins pronounced the sentence. Higgins also ordered Butcher to serve five years' probation and pay a $320,000 fine. Butcher, 49, had faced up to 25 years in prison under a plea agreement with prosecutors.
FOOD
June 22, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
We speak of more than one thing this day. It's mailbag day. A time to talk of some of the things that some of you, by your cards and letters, have let me know you're interested in talking about. Keep those cards and letters coming. It helps me answer the ever nagging question, "What'll I write about this week?" Nostalgia is the order of the day. A couple of letters have come across the old meat block that fall into the "why can't I get some of that good old stuff that I used to get before they started putting everything in plastic packages and I can't get anything good anymore" category.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
Interest rates on short-term Treasury securities dropped about one-third of a percentage point in yesterday's auction, to the lowest levels in nine years. The Treasury Department sold $7.82 billion in three-month bills at an average discount rate of 5.32 percent, down from 5.64 percent last week. An additional $7.81 billion in six-month bills was sold at an average discount rate of 5.35 percent, down from 5.65 percent last week. The rates were the lowest since the 5.163 percent of July 25, 1977, for three-month bills and the 5.246 percent of July 1, 1977, for six-month bills.
FOOD
December 17, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
Some things that I see in supermarket meatcases would like to drive me crazy. More than a few meat markets use merchandising tricks that are more than a little unethical. They're downright dishonest. They ought to be illegal, but they're not. One of the classics, and the one that makes me the craziest - it makes me want to run out of the store, find a lawyer and file a class action suit - is one I call the "roasting chicken rip-off. " These are chickens labeled "Roasting Chickens" that are no larger than those labeled "Frying Chickens" but are priced 50 cents to 75 cents per pound MORE!
FOOD
September 18, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent weeks, some voters may have acquired a curiosity, if not a taste, for moose - after hearing that Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has stalked, shot, skinned and stewed moose. That may sound like a startling achievement to urbanites, though I'm not certain it bears much relevance to her vice-presidential qualifications. But there are women in other parts of the country who hunt moose for the meat - using either bows or rifles. And that got me thinking - What if I wanted to put myself to the moose test?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Although Comics Guy tries not to review the same book twice in a short period of time since there are so many quality books out there, I am breaking that rule with "The Boys. " Issue No. 17 reinforces the fact that there isn't another book like it on the stands. It includes perhaps the greatest, most memorable scene in comics this year, a scene so hilarious, Comics Guy was laughing out loud more than half an hour after he put it down. Which reminded Comics Guy that when he reviewed "The Boys" three months ago, I had focused on the (literally)
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Night has fallen in Feltonville, ending for another day the Muslim fast of Ramadan. It is soup time at the Chicken Hut, a landmark for Philadelphia's Muslims that is part carryout, eat-in, grocery, butcher, bookstore and community center. "All the doors of hellfire are closed," explained owner Aimen Soudi Alqassabjy. It is time, he said last night, "for good deeds we like to do. One of the good deeds is to feed another fasting person. " So every customer or visitor after sunset gets a cup of turkey soup, and maybe some dates.
NEWS
December 21, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard J. "Babe" Leidy, 84, of Blackwood Terrace, Gloucester County, the longtime owner of Leidy Market who also served as president of the Union Fire Company and founded the Deptford Township Fire Commission, died following complications from surgery on Friday, Dec. 17, at Cooper University Hospital. When large chain grocery stores in the area forced Mr. Leidy's family-owned market to close in 1986, he expressed his disappointment at the change in the milelong stretch on Good Intent Road, which once was lined with businesses.
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