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Butter

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
The gentleman at the next able wanted his vegetables steamed. No butter, no margarine, no oil, with or without garlic. The pleasant waitress made two trips to the kitchen to negotiate. Fifteen minutes later, she delivered a loaf-shaped mound of unadorned steamed spinach to the table that would have satisfied Popeye. Did the man know he was dealing with a butterholic in the kitchen at Cafe 2825? Did he have any idea that we would get all the butter he rejected, soaking the broccoli, flooding the scampi, drenching the veal francaise?
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Spending a week in a large refrigerator carving 900 pounds of butter into two life-size cows and the late chocolate magnate Milton Hershey is challenge enough. But then Hershey wound up too tall. And he was facing the wrong direction. And the chocolate to coat him was two days late. What now? No sweat for a pro such as veteran butter sculptor Jim Victor. He was still smiling last week as he scrunched himself cowside, putting a few final pats into place on the annual butter sculpture at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, which opened yesterday.
FOOD
June 15, 1986 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
There is no true substitute for butter. Though we have tried for more than a century to develop a product that matches its appearance, its flavor and its culinary potential, nobody has done so. Most margarines taste as much like butter as cherry candy tastes like cherries. Pastry made with butter-flavored shortening is a pale cousin to an all-butter crust, and no low-cholesterol spread in a tub can fill a muffin's nooks and crannies with the same steam of sweet cream as the real thing.
SPORTS
March 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jeff Johnsen's unlikely "butter" shot toasted Saint Louis. Johnsen's off-balance three-pointer - barely beating the shot clock - with 1:43 left carried Utah to a 48-45 victory over Saint Louis last night in the Midwest Regional at Cleveland State University. "I saw the shot clock at the very last second," Johnsen said. "We yell 'butter!' when it goes inside 10 seconds. I heard 'butter!' and I just let it fly. And I was lucky. " Johnsen's shot from his hip gave the Utes (23-8)
FOOD
June 29, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Most cooks can close their eyes and imagine the sounds of butter sizzling in a saute pan. That's a nice recollection. They can also probably recall the bitter smell of that butter scorching when the heat was too high, or when it was left to sizzle unattended. Burning butter is frustrating; the time it takes to clean the pan and start over also can have a domino effect on the timing of your recipe. There's a simple way to address that problem: Use clarified butter. Butter is clarified by being melted slowly.
FOOD
December 6, 1989 | By Mindy Hermann, Special to the Daily News
Most people would place butter high on a list of health-iffy foods. It's calorie-dense and almost 100 percent fat. Plus, there's strong evidence that a diet high in cholesterol and saturated fat - the kind in butter - can clog your arteries and steal years from your life. A high-fat diet also increases the risk of developing cancer. With all that in mind, American consumers have started backing away from butter. Since the mid-1980s butter use has dropped by about 10 percent. Meanwhile, the market for butter substitutes, virtually non-existent 10 years ago, has blossomed to include all sorts of buttery-tasting spreads, sprinkles and sprays.
FOOD
January 3, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The virtue of clarified butter is that it can withstand higher cooking temperatures than unclarified butter. That means it will not burn as easily, making it a better medium for sauteing and browning foods. Another plus is that clarified butter keeps longer than regular butter. Though some cooks might miss the buttery flavor that's lost in the clarifying process, an interesting, subtle, nutty flavor takes its place. Clarified butter is made by simply melting butter slowly so that the milk solids sink to the bottom of the pan in the form of a residue.
FOOD
March 7, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can you tell me how to make whipped butter like the butter they serve in pancake houses? - Carole Whipped butter couldn't be easier! Simply place a stick of softened (room temperature) butter in a deep bowl and whip with an electric mixer until light, fluffy and greater in volume. Scoop into an attractive serving bowl to serve with pancakes or waffles, hot biscuits, fresh bread or anything else that is enhanced by the smooth savor of fresh butter. It may be stored in the refrigerator in a tightly covered bowl.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the same time that you're buttering your morning toast, you also may be slathering it with the tiny amounts of the flame retardant PBDE. In a study to be published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers found that each of 10 samples of butter purchased at five Dallas grocery stores contained various types of PBDEs. Although it was a limited sampling and the amounts were small enough to be measured in trillionths of a gram per gram of butter, lead researcher Arnold Schecter said the concentration was the highest found so far in food.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about clogged arteries. Hundreds of pounds of butter and 200 gallons of diesel oil shut down northbound lanes of the New Jersey Turnpike in Camden County for about six hours yesterday following an early-morning pileup involving five tractor-trailers and a van. The crash occurred shortly after 2:30 a.m. when one of the big rigs, driven by an 82-year-old, failed to slow down in a construction zone between Exits 3 and 4 in Cherry Hill,...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 15, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
As darkness crept over East Falls on a recent night, Meagan Benz and Shannon Roche arrived at their subleased commissary kitchen and unfolded a sprawling order list: oversize corn muffins, rich brownies, chewy peanut butter cookies, zucchini bread, chip-wiches, and "banana split" cupcakes, made of banana cake topped with frosting, chocolate drizzle, sprinkles, and a maraschino cherry. All of this was conjured without a trace of butter, eggs, or cream. Benz and Roche's wares, produced under the name Crust Vegan Bakery and sold at eateries like Joe Coffee and HipCityVeg, are entirely plant-based.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016 | Lauren McCutcheon, Staff Writer
The long: Pre-kids, parents vow they'll never subject their young (or themselves) to made-for-kids' music. Only Bowie, Beethoven, and Beyoncé for their brood. When reality intervenes, World Café Live's decade-running, Saturday morning mini-concerts offer a chill compromise. The short: "If You're Happy and You Know It," just better. The demo: Ages 2 through 5. Siblings welcome. Babies free. How long: About an hour. The setup: Sunny, street-level bar with small stage and dance area, tables, chairs and banquettes.
FOOD
January 8, 2016
8-10 servings For the crust: 1 stick unsalted butter 2 tablespoons sugar 2 egg yolks, lightly beaten 13/4 cups flour, sifted with 1 teaspoon baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons light cream 16-18 Italian prune plums, pitted and quartered For the tart topping: Mix together 3/4 cup sugar 11/2 tablespoons flour 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 3 tablespoons butter   1....
FOOD
December 31, 2015 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Serves 6. 2 tablespoons sunflower oil 8 rashers smoked streaky bacon, snipped into pieces 1 onion, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, peeled and bashed 1 ounce dark muscovado sugar 2 tablespoons molasses 31/2 fluid ounces cider vinegar 2 teaspoons mustard powder 18 ounces tomato puree 1 shot espresso 14-ounce can navy beans, rinsed and drained 14-ounce can pinto beans, rinsed and drained 6 slices white...
FOOD
November 6, 2015
Maybe this year's load of Paleo-titled cookbooks is too close to my desk, but when I saw this recipe in The New Cast-Iron Cookbook , I thought it could be served without its accompanying pasta, making it almost paleo, save for the butter. (A "paleo" diet is free of processed foods, grains, and dairy.) Shrimp and Avocado in Tequila-Tomato Sauce 4 servings   3 tablespoons cold unsalted butter 1 medium bulb fennel 11/4 pounds peeled and deveined large shrimp 1/2 cup tequila 2 ripe avocados One 28-ounce can no-salt-added whole tomatoes, preferably fire-roasted 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/2 bunch cilantro 2 limes   1. Melt half of the butter in a large skillet over medium heat.
FOOD
October 30, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
A better butter  Just as Italians debate the subtleties of their finest olive oils, the French obsess over butters. One of my longtime favorites, Echiré, has been the butter gold standard at Bibou, and the equally wonderful Pamplie (with sea salt) lathers the baguettes at sister restaurant Le Chéri. But a new contender has arrived at Di Bruno Bros. in a big wicker basket from one of France's rock-star cheese mongers, Rodolphe Le Meunier. This "beurre de baratte" - churned in the old-school way as opposed to modern centrifuge methods - isn't le bonmarché at $12.99 a pound.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What it is: It may be difficult to believe that peanut butter was once considered a health food. But allergies and calories aside, jelly's better half is such a favorite the typical American consumes six pounds of peanut butter a year. And it is certainly a ubiquitous consumable, appearing in the kitchen cupboards of 94 percent of U.S. households. Though it seems like a magical substance that is usually eaten spread on other foods such as apples and crackers - or on bread and paired with fruit preserves to create that lunchbox favorite - it is not much more than a simple recipe of dry roasted peanuts, and perhaps some salt, ground to make a paste.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
DENISE FIKE'S MEATBALLS Serves 6-8 1/2 c. extra virgin olive oil (or more as needed) 4 Tbsp. butter (or more as needed) 1 large onion, chopped 3 carrots, minced 2 stalks celery, minced 3 cloves garlic minced 1/8 cup Gravy Master 1/4 cup soy sauce 5 dashes Angostura bitters 1 lb. ground veal 1 lb. ground sirloin 1 lb. ground pork 2 eggs 1 bunch parsley, stemmed and minced 1/2 cup Parmigiano...
FOOD
July 24, 2015
It's really not so crazy, having a warm bowl of soup on a hot day. As chowders go, this is a light one, fragrant with thyme. To make this vegetarian, skip the bacon fat, and add an extra tablespoon of butter for sauteing the onion, seasoning it liberally with smoked Spanish paprika. Serve with a tomato-graced salad. Double Corn Summer Chowder 4 servings (makes about 101/2 cups) 5 cups water 5 or 6 medium ears corn 12 ounces small yellow creamer potatoes 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed 1 large onion 1 small bunch fresh thyme 4 ounces thick-cut bacon 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 tablespoons flour 2 cups half-and-half 1 teaspoon sugar Freshly ground black pepper 1. Bring the water to a boil in a large pot. 2. Meanwhile, shuck the corn and remove any silk, then cut off and reserve the kernels (to yield 4 cups)
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THE FOURTH annual Harvest on Henry event last month was no pie-in-the-sky venture. It raised $13,000 to support the educational agricultural opportunities at Henry Got Crops CSA, a community-supported agriculture partnership between Saul High School, Weavers Way Food Co-op, Weavers Way Community Programs and Fairmount Park. The daylong festival gave Saul students a chance to interact with the public and featured farm-inspired activities, such as hay rides, pumpkin crafts and - to show off students' cooking skills - a pie-baking contest.
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