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Butter

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
The gentleman at the next able wanted his vegetables steamed. No butter, no margarine, no oil, with or without garlic. The pleasant waitress made two trips to the kitchen to negotiate. Fifteen minutes later, she delivered a loaf-shaped mound of unadorned steamed spinach to the table that would have satisfied Popeye. Did the man know he was dealing with a butterholic in the kitchen at Cafe 2825? Did he have any idea that we would get all the butter he rejected, soaking the broccoli, flooding the scampi, drenching the veal francaise?
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Spending a week in a large refrigerator carving 900 pounds of butter into two life-size cows and the late chocolate magnate Milton Hershey is challenge enough. But then Hershey wound up too tall. And he was facing the wrong direction. And the chocolate to coat him was two days late. What now? No sweat for a pro such as veteran butter sculptor Jim Victor. He was still smiling last week as he scrunched himself cowside, putting a few final pats into place on the annual butter sculpture at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, which opened yesterday.
FOOD
June 15, 1986 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
There is no true substitute for butter. Though we have tried for more than a century to develop a product that matches its appearance, its flavor and its culinary potential, nobody has done so. Most margarines taste as much like butter as cherry candy tastes like cherries. Pastry made with butter-flavored shortening is a pale cousin to an all-butter crust, and no low-cholesterol spread in a tub can fill a muffin's nooks and crannies with the same steam of sweet cream as the real thing.
SPORTS
March 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jeff Johnsen's unlikely "butter" shot toasted Saint Louis. Johnsen's off-balance three-pointer - barely beating the shot clock - with 1:43 left carried Utah to a 48-45 victory over Saint Louis last night in the Midwest Regional at Cleveland State University. "I saw the shot clock at the very last second," Johnsen said. "We yell 'butter!' when it goes inside 10 seconds. I heard 'butter!' and I just let it fly. And I was lucky. " Johnsen's shot from his hip gave the Utes (23-8)
FOOD
June 29, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Most cooks can close their eyes and imagine the sounds of butter sizzling in a saute pan. That's a nice recollection. They can also probably recall the bitter smell of that butter scorching when the heat was too high, or when it was left to sizzle unattended. Burning butter is frustrating; the time it takes to clean the pan and start over also can have a domino effect on the timing of your recipe. There's a simple way to address that problem: Use clarified butter. Butter is clarified by being melted slowly.
FOOD
December 6, 1989 | By Mindy Hermann, Special to the Daily News
Most people would place butter high on a list of health-iffy foods. It's calorie-dense and almost 100 percent fat. Plus, there's strong evidence that a diet high in cholesterol and saturated fat - the kind in butter - can clog your arteries and steal years from your life. A high-fat diet also increases the risk of developing cancer. With all that in mind, American consumers have started backing away from butter. Since the mid-1980s butter use has dropped by about 10 percent. Meanwhile, the market for butter substitutes, virtually non-existent 10 years ago, has blossomed to include all sorts of buttery-tasting spreads, sprinkles and sprays.
FOOD
January 3, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The virtue of clarified butter is that it can withstand higher cooking temperatures than unclarified butter. That means it will not burn as easily, making it a better medium for sauteing and browning foods. Another plus is that clarified butter keeps longer than regular butter. Though some cooks might miss the buttery flavor that's lost in the clarifying process, an interesting, subtle, nutty flavor takes its place. Clarified butter is made by simply melting butter slowly so that the milk solids sink to the bottom of the pan in the form of a residue.
FOOD
March 7, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can you tell me how to make whipped butter like the butter they serve in pancake houses? - Carole Whipped butter couldn't be easier! Simply place a stick of softened (room temperature) butter in a deep bowl and whip with an electric mixer until light, fluffy and greater in volume. Scoop into an attractive serving bowl to serve with pancakes or waffles, hot biscuits, fresh bread or anything else that is enhanced by the smooth savor of fresh butter. It may be stored in the refrigerator in a tightly covered bowl.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the same time that you're buttering your morning toast, you also may be slathering it with the tiny amounts of the flame retardant PBDE. In a study to be published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers found that each of 10 samples of butter purchased at five Dallas grocery stores contained various types of PBDEs. Although it was a limited sampling and the amounts were small enough to be measured in trillionths of a gram per gram of butter, lead researcher Arnold Schecter said the concentration was the highest found so far in food.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about clogged arteries. Hundreds of pounds of butter and 200 gallons of diesel oil shut down northbound lanes of the New Jersey Turnpike in Camden County for about six hours yesterday following an early-morning pileup involving five tractor-trailers and a van. The crash occurred shortly after 2:30 a.m. when one of the big rigs, driven by an 82-year-old, failed to slow down in a construction zone between Exits 3 and 4 in Cherry Hill,...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 2 servings 4 slices of your bread of choice 1/4 cup crunchy peanut butter 1 cup sour cherries Sea salt, to taste 1. Toast bread, slather with crunchy peanut butter, stud with sour cherries, and sprinkle with sea salt. Per Serving (with wheat bread) : 458 calories; 16 grams protein; 61 grams carbohydrates; 6 grams sugar; 18 grams fat; no cholesterol; 433 milligrams sodium; 6 grams dietary fiber.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Sunny's Omelet Makes 2 servings 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces baby spinach 4 ounces of white mushrooms, sliced Sprig of fresh or pinch of dried thyme (optional) 4 large eggs 2 teaspoons butter 1. Preheat a 10-inch nonstick sauté pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes. 2. When the pan is hot, add oil to the pan and swirl to coat the bottom. 3. Add the mushrooms and thyme (if using) to the pan and sauté for 3-5 minutes. 4. If you used a sprig of fresh thyme, remove it and discard, add the spinach to the pan with the mushrooms, and add a pinch of salt and a pinch of pepper (optional)
FOOD
June 3, 2016
Makes 8 servings 5½ pounds beef cheeks 3 12-ounce bottles Flemish red ale 1 bouquet garni (sprigs of herbs such as thyme, bay leaf, basil, and rosemary tied together in a bundle) 1 pound onions, peeled and chopped Oil or butter for sauteing 1 quart veal stock ½ cup vinegar 8 tablespoons mustard 31/2 ounce slice gingerbread 1. The day before serving, cut the beef cheeks into pieces about 1½ inch square and place in a bowl along with three-quarters of the beer and the bouquet garni.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have been in a serious relationship with my boyfriend for two years. He shared with me that he was sexually abused by a cousin for years as a child. He told me he has never disclosed it to anyone but me. My boyfriend says he has come to terms with the abuse and his abuser, but I'm not sure it's true. He became really upset when he spoke about it the one time, and we haven't discussed it since. I'm afraid to pry, but I think he may need help. His abuser is still present in his life.
FOOD
April 29, 2016
Makes 16 biscuits with strawberry topping For the topping: 2 pints strawberries 1 tablespoon sugar 8 ounces vanilla yogurt For the biscuits: 11/2 cups flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 4 teaspoons sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 6 tablespoons cold butter 3/4 cup whole milk 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. 2. Wash, hull, and slice the strawberries. Place them in a bowl and sprinkle with the sugar. Set aside. 3. Stir together flour, salt, sugar, and baking powder in a large bowl.
FOOD
April 22, 2016
Makes 8 servings 1/4 cup butter, melted 1 cup cornmeal 3/4 cup flour 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 eggs 1 cup milk 1/2 cup grated Cheddar cheese 1. Preheat oven to 350 F. 2. Melt butter in cast-iron pan. 3. Combine cornmeal, flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder in medium mixing bowl. 4. Crack eggs into a larger mixing bowl. Add the milk and the remainder of the butter after greasing the skillet.
FOOD
April 22, 2016
Makes 4 servings 2 cups spinach 11/2 cups flat leaf parsley 1/2 cup celery leaves 4 medium-size Idaho potatoes 3/8 cup matzo meal, plus 1/2 cup more for dusting 1 egg 1 tablespoon Kosher salt, plus 1/4 cup for salting the water 1/4 cup olive oil 4 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon ground black pepper Juice   of 1/2 a lemon 1/2 cup grated raclette cheese, or Gruyere if raclette is unavailable ...
FOOD
April 1, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1 recipe basic polenta 11/2 teaspoons butter (for the casserole dish) 4 links of mild Italian salmon sausage, sliced into bite-size pieces 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon olive oil 11/2 cup tomato sauce (homemade if possible) 8 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated Basic Polenta 3 cups nonfat milk 1 tablespoon butter 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup stone ground yellow cornmeal 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
FOOD
March 25, 2016
Yields two cakes; serves 24 Butter for greasing pan 2 packages active dry yeast 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup warm water (110 to 115 ºF) 8 to 9 cups unbleached all-purpose flour 1½ cups milk 1 cup unsalted butter ¾ cup golden raisins ¼ cup rum 6 large eggs 2 large egg yolks 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cardamom 1 tablespoon grated orange zest 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest 2 large egg whites 1 tablespoon water Topping 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ cup slivered almonds ½ cup unbleached all-purpose flour Glaze 2 large egg whites 1½ cups sifted confectioners' sugar ½ teaspoon fresh lemon juice 1.    Lightly butter two 10-inch tube pans.
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Makes 6 servings 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 large rutabaga, peeled and cut into 3/8 inch dice (7 cups) 1/3 cup thyme leaves 1 cup finely grated parmesan 2 cloves garlic, crushed Scant 5 tablespoons capers, coarsely chopped 3 small yellow bell peppers 3 small red bell peppers 2 teaspoons olive oil 6-ounce chevre log, broken into 3/8 inch pieces 1/3 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, coarsely chopped ...
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