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NEWS
October 21, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Captain Yuri Tsibin greets visitors to the Proliv Diany, a 568-foot Russian refrigerated cargo ship, with a firm handshake and a holiday smile. Inside the rusting, 10-year-old vessel that needs a good paint job, Yuriy is most commanding in a white shirt, black tie and black uniform with gold rank stripes on the sleeves. Sartorial splendor on the Proliv Diany ends with the captain. His tired-looking 36-member crew, which has been helping Teamsters load the ship with crates of frozen, lightly salted butter soon to be bound for Russia, is mostly in T-shirts and jeans.
FOOD
June 19, 1991 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to the Inquirer
From childhood, we have been conditioned to think that butter goes on bread, that dessert is sugary, and that anything will taste better with a little salt on it. And for such conditioning we have paid a heavy toll in heart disease, obesity and circulatory problems. Perhaps it's time to recondition ourselves - not just by finding substitutes for sugar, salt, saturated fat and cholesterol, but by getting away from the notion of substitution altogether. There is no perfect substitute for butter or sugar or ice cream or eggs.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As the 19th century turned into the 20th, Pennsylvania ranked among the nation's leaders in the production of butter. And the bulk of this butter was produced in our region. The butter interests at that time were under economic attack from the makers of oleomargarine. Their feud became a hot political issue. Before 1875, butter-making took place on the farm, and production was in the hands of women. Butter from Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties sold for top prices in the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore markets.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | By Robert Reno
An entire generation of Americans has grown up feeling superior because they ate right while their friends were stuffing themselves with butterfat, red meat and fried foods. The margarine industry particularly has prospered on the theory - widely promoted by the food police - that it is less likely to clog your arteries than butter. You know the type: loudly munching their carrot sticks, haughtily dipping into their corn oil spread, blowing half their disposable incomes at health-food stores.
LIVING
August 29, 1999 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Behold the wonders of the Iowa State Fair: the Last Supper carved out of butter, the $3,000 cinnamon roll, the chain-saw Rodin, the deep-fried candy bar on a stick, and Buddy, the big bull. Big isn't big enough for Buddy. At 2,980 pounds, he's a butter-yellow truck. "He's as gentle as can be," said teenage owner Andy Mai and, sure enough, Buddy slept through much of the fair. We had come, however, for the swine. Hogs are huge in Iowa, which produces a quarter of the nation's pork.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
FRENCHTOWN, N.J. — Elizabeth Gilbert is standing at her stove, stirring flour into melted butter, attempting a simple white sauce for the base of an oyster bisque. As she slowly adds the milk, just as directed in the recipe, the sauce clumps. "I don't know about this, I've never made a white sauce before," she says, stirring furiously to smooth out the lumps. The best-selling author of Eat, Pray, Love is the first to admit her greatest talent is not in the kitchen.
FOOD
April 19, 1989 | By Jean Anderson and Elaine Hanna, Special to The Inquirer
If you've never tried scrambling eggs in the microwave, now is the time to try. Microwave-scrambled eggs can be the fluffiest imaginable. And here's another advantage: If you're dieting, you can eliminate some fat, because scrambled eggs don't stick to microwave "pans" the way they do to a stove-top skillet. The cooking times given here are for refrigerator-cold, large eggs. Obviously, warmer, smaller or larger eggs will microwave more quickly or slowly. For best results, follow our recipe explicitly and abide by these guidelines: Always use the container size recommended.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2007 | By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan, staff
Q. I am helping entertain a big crowd and need your help with a couple of easy desserts for about 55 to 65 people. I have never made a dessert for more than 10! What do you recommend? Please hurry. Thanks, thanks and more thanks. - Sara P. A. Sara, please hurry and grab the Yellow Pages and your credit card. Please hurry and flip the pages to "Caterers" and make the call. There! Whew! That was close, but together we got that taken care of - what a relief. OK, you know that's not my real answer - not that you couldn't go that route.
FOOD
March 3, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dinner at the Kensington home of John Vick and Amanda Jaffe is as simple as roast chicken, mashed potatoes, salad, and biscuits - and as complicated as farm-raised, sustainably grown, homemade, and locally sourced. Jaffe uses chicken from Griggstown Quail Farm outside Princeton, unaltered by hormones or antibiotics. Vick mashes the All Blue potatoes, a variety that produces colorful flesh as well as skin, from Tuscarora Organic Growers in Hustontown, Pa., adding butter from Hometown Provisions in Lancaster County and whole milk from Trickling Springs Creamery in Chambersburg, Pa. For his biscuits, Vick blends heirloom cornmeal from Rineer Family Farms in Lancaster and buttermilk from Maplehofe Dairy in Quarryville, Pa. The salad greens, baby arugula, and baby spinach were grown hydroponically at Woodland Produce in Fairton, N.J., by a farmer who recently got a grant from the USDA to install photovoltaic cells in order to run his greenhouses on solar energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | by Kent Steinriede For the Daily News
Germany, probably more than any other country on the planet, is hellbent on quality. This ranges from cars to cutlery to even the spartan yet satisfying sandwiches served at both breakfast and lunch. Take heavy, dark rye bread, some cold cuts and maybe a slice of cheese or a dab of mustard, and you've got the classic German sandwich. Don't even think about mayonnaise or butter, says Walter Rieker, co-owner of Rieker's Prime Meats, 7979 Oxford Ave. (215-745-3114) in Fox Chase, where nearly all the meat cold cuts and sausages are made and smoked on the premises.
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