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Butterfly

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NEWS
August 20, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a gardener, Frank Victor started out like the rest of us. He planted things in the wrong place, stuff died, he soldiered on. There the comparison ends. From the looks of his Hainesport, Burlington County, garden today, Victor, 64, has zoomed ahead of the pack. His half-acre backyard, in the Sage Run development, was deftly thought out and planted to attract wildlife - mostly butterflies, and especially monarchs. "I'm a monarch guy," says Victor, who's been pretty much a full-time home gardener since April 17, 2009, when he was laid off from his management job at Unisys, after 40 years and five months.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
White smoke from the small cooking fires rises lightly toward the tops of the tall Oyamel fir trees. Soda pops of every color are lined up precisely on the edges of primitive wooden picnic tables. Local peasant women, wearing bright checked aprons over clashing print dresses, slap-slap-slap their blue tortilla dough in anticipation of the many tourists who will soon come huffing and puffing up the steep hills on their way to see the spot where millions of U.S. and Canadian monarch butterflies spend the winter months.
SPORTS
July 22, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Still in medical school and with just a month of solid training, Jenny Thompson of the United States claimed her first individual gold medal in a major meet since 1998 by winning the women's 100-meter butterfly yesterday in the Swimming World Championships in Barcelona, Spain. Thompson finished in 57.96 seconds for her record 11th medal in world-championship competition. Otylia Jedrzejczak of Poland was second in 58.22. World records were broken by Matthew Welsh and Leisel Jones of Australia and Kosuke Kitajima of Japan.
SPORTS
August 11, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Marathon swimmer Vicki Keith last night became the first person to swim the treacherous Juan De Fuca Strait between Canada and the United States using the grueling butterfly stroke. Thousands of spectators waited on shore in Victoria to welcome the exhausted swimmer after her 14-hour, 20-minute swim from Port Angeles, Wash. Keith, 28, a Canadian, waved to the crowd but said nothing upon her arrival, more than five hours ahead of schedule. She appeared to falter and shake uncontrollably as paramedics carried her up a steep cliff to an ambulance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
David Henry Hwang's brilliant and complex drama, M. Butterfly, is so good it can survive Philadelphia Theatre Company's visually stunning but otherwise wobbly production. The play is based on a true story: In the 1980s a French diplomat was convicted of treason for having provided military information to the Chinese government through his lover of 20 years. That Song Liling would turn out to have been a man as well as a spy is only one of the play's elaborate duplicities. The many and devious ways politics, sex and race are interlaced is M. Butterfly's point and power.
SPORTS
July 10, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Michael Phelps broke the world record in the 100-meter butterfly yesterday during the U.S. national swimming championships in Indianapolis, giving him five individual world marks. The 14-time Olympic gold medalist swam the two-lap final in 50.22 seconds at the Indiana University Natatorium. He lowered Ian Crocker's mark of 50.40, set at the 2005 world championships in Montreal. Phelps holds world records in the 100 and 200 butterfly, 200 and 400 individual medley, and the 200 freestyle.
NEWS
June 23, 2008
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania National Guard plans to offer free guided tours of a rare butterfly colony at Fort Indiantown Gap in Lebanon County. The guard says the fort is the home of the only viable colony of regal fritillary butterflies in the eastern United States. The tours are to begin at 9 a.m. on July 4, 5, 14 and 21, and at 1 p.m. on July 13. - AP
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | By John Roach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Holy Ghost Prep senior Tim Melinson entered Friday's PIAA District 1 Class AA 100-yard butterfly as the eighth seed, a placement that didn't earn him a spot in the top-qualifying heat at the University of Pennsylvania's six-lane Sheerr Pool. So when Melinson ripped off a time of 53.48 seconds, he had to wait for the results of the final heat to see whether he won the event, even though his own time broke the Class AA meet record of 53.76. Melinson ended up with a second-place finish.
SPORTS
January 20, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Matt Zelen dived into the pool to start the 100-yard butterfly, then remembered something. He'd forgotten to tie his racing suit. When the St. John's University junior felt his suit sliding off in the Collegeville, Minn., pool, he decided to kick it off and finish the race. Zelen, a contender for the 2000 Olympics, would have won the race at the College of St. Benedict/St. John's University Invitational on Saturday night by more than two seconds. But Zelen was stripped of more than just his suit - he was disqualified for violating a uniform code.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | By Jeremy Treatman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Conestoga junior Kelly Brennan seemed to be a shoo-in to make the state swimming meet in her top event, the 100-yard butterfly. But a freak injury during the PIAA District 1 Class AAA meet Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania almost cost her that opportunity. "I had a wart on the top of my finger, and somewhere during the 50-yard freestyle, I hit and it started bleeding," Brennan said. "We bandaged it up a couple of times, and it still wouldn't stop. " Her butterfly race was coming up, and under PIAA rules, she would not be allowed in the water with a bleeding finger.
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NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG First there were endangered species, then endangered buildings. Now Pennsylvania is recognizing its most threatened objects. And we're not talking about just any old dust-collecting bric-a-brac. These are priceless artifacts - tangible pieces of Pennsylvania history. An elaborately illustrated 16th-century Mennonite Bible; the oldest surviving butterfly specimens; Red Grooms' celebrated Philadelphia quadricentennial installation, "Philadelphia Cornucopia"; and Thaddeus Stevens' wig are all among the pieces housed in Pennsylvania collections and named to the state's first list of Top Ten Endangered Artifacts.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The monarch butterflies at the Tyler Arboretum were about a week old, so it was time for them to move on. About 60 orange-and-black monarchs, freshly emerged from their chrysalises, were tagged and released into the wild at the arboretum's Butterfly Festival on Saturday. Over the next several weeks, the delicate insects will flutter about 2,500 miles south and then west before settling in a central Mexican mountain range with millions of others, the longest migratory journey of any North American butterfly.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
A caption Friday with a photograph of a butterfly gave the wrong species of butterfly. It was a tiger swallowtail.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Hillary Siegel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dressed in clothing with holes and sweaters marked by yellow stars, the actors from the Wolf Performing Arts Center played out a children's story of fear, sadness, and hope while in the Terezin concentration camp. The words came from the poems and stories in the book and play I Never Saw Another Butterfly, based on the experiences of the children who wrote poems and made artworks to pass the time in the camp. The title comes from a poem, "The Butterfly," written by one of the children.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
DEAD BUTTERFLIES, more colorful than any exotic bloom. Old oil drums and milk jugs, transformed into something new. But nothing at the Philadelphia Flower Show represents life's endless loop more than the giant, steaming pile of . . . "Mommy, it's poop ," a giggling little girl said Sunday, at one unique display. The large, cartoon-like pile of poop is part of the Philadelphia Water Department's award-winning "The Power of Poop" display at the flower show. The display is all about reusing waste to create power, from our own waste to the scraps we shove down the garbage disposal.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
The made-up stories of the next five months are passionate, often international, sometimes (or are they?) occult. The short novel and short story are coming on strong again. Biography, autobiography, and history loom large, as always, among nonfiction titles. Butterflies and the Bible make an appearance, too. Plenty to keep a reader busy, from here to the summer solstice and beyond. - By John Timpane and Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer staff writers Butterflies, the Bible, passionate fiction - the books of spring Fiction The River Swimmer: Novellas by Jim Harrison (Grove, $25, Jan. 8)
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Flight Behavior By Barbara Kingsolver HarperCollins. 448 pp. $28.99 Reviewed by Judith Musser   For fans of Barbara Kingsolver's fiction, Flight Behavior will be a pleasant return to a familiar setting with recognizable characters, memorable dialogue, common themes, and well-written prose that has become associated with a Kingsolver novel. As in Prodigal Summer , Kingsolver revisits Appalachia and re-creates a plot imbued with ecological and biological importance.
SPORTS
August 29, 2012 | BY TIM GILBERT, Daily News Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE - Bill O'Brien told it like it is. "I will certainly have butterflies before this game," Penn State's first-year head coach said Tuesday at the news conference to discuss Saturday's season opener against visiting Ohio. "I mean, I'd be crazy to tell you otherwise. " After all, O'Brien's first real game at a stadium that holds more than 106,000 people is this weekend, and it comes after the most eventful summer Penn State has ever seen. But when game time actually rolls around after a summer of fielding all sorts of non-football questions, O'Brien will be ready.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press
TOKYO - Radiation that leaked from the Fukushima nuclear plant following last year's tsunami caused mutations in some butterflies - including dented eyes and stunted wings - though humans seem relatively unaffected, researchers say. The mutations are the first evidence that the radiation has caused genetic changes in living organisms. They are likely to add to concerns about potential health risks among humans though there is no evidence of it yet. Scientists say more study is needed to link human health with the Fukushima disaster.
SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | By Kate Hairopoulos, DALLAS MORNING NEWS
LONDON - Dana Vollmer finished a blistering final 50 meters of the 100 butterfly Sunday, smacked the wall, ditched her goggles, and squinted at the clock. It took a moment to find it, then to sink in. She had done it: 55.98 seconds. A world record. An exultant smile spread, and she shot her fist in the air at the Olympics Aquatics Centre. Four years after missing the 2008 Beijing Games almost made her quit swimming, and eight years after winning relay gold as a 16-year-old at the 2004 Athens Games, the Granbury, Texas, native won her first individual Olympic gold in historic fashion.
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