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Butterfly

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NEWS
August 20, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a gardener, Frank Victor started out like the rest of us. He planted things in the wrong place, stuff died, he soldiered on. There the comparison ends. From the looks of his Hainesport, Burlington County, garden today, Victor, 64, has zoomed ahead of the pack. His half-acre backyard, in the Sage Run development, was deftly thought out and planted to attract wildlife - mostly butterflies, and especially monarchs. "I'm a monarch guy," says Victor, who's been pretty much a full-time home gardener since April 17, 2009, when he was laid off from his management job at Unisys, after 40 years and five months.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
White smoke from the small cooking fires rises lightly toward the tops of the tall Oyamel fir trees. Soda pops of every color are lined up precisely on the edges of primitive wooden picnic tables. Local peasant women, wearing bright checked aprons over clashing print dresses, slap-slap-slap their blue tortilla dough in anticipation of the many tourists who will soon come huffing and puffing up the steep hills on their way to see the spot where millions of U.S. and Canadian monarch butterflies spend the winter months.
SPORTS
July 22, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Still in medical school and with just a month of solid training, Jenny Thompson of the United States claimed her first individual gold medal in a major meet since 1998 by winning the women's 100-meter butterfly yesterday in the Swimming World Championships in Barcelona, Spain. Thompson finished in 57.96 seconds for her record 11th medal in world-championship competition. Otylia Jedrzejczak of Poland was second in 58.22. World records were broken by Matthew Welsh and Leisel Jones of Australia and Kosuke Kitajima of Japan.
SPORTS
August 11, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Marathon swimmer Vicki Keith last night became the first person to swim the treacherous Juan De Fuca Strait between Canada and the United States using the grueling butterfly stroke. Thousands of spectators waited on shore in Victoria to welcome the exhausted swimmer after her 14-hour, 20-minute swim from Port Angeles, Wash. Keith, 28, a Canadian, waved to the crowd but said nothing upon her arrival, more than five hours ahead of schedule. She appeared to falter and shake uncontrollably as paramedics carried her up a steep cliff to an ambulance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
David Henry Hwang's brilliant and complex drama, M. Butterfly, is so good it can survive Philadelphia Theatre Company's visually stunning but otherwise wobbly production. The play is based on a true story: In the 1980s a French diplomat was convicted of treason for having provided military information to the Chinese government through his lover of 20 years. That Song Liling would turn out to have been a man as well as a spy is only one of the play's elaborate duplicities. The many and devious ways politics, sex and race are interlaced is M. Butterfly's point and power.
SPORTS
July 10, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Michael Phelps broke the world record in the 100-meter butterfly yesterday during the U.S. national swimming championships in Indianapolis, giving him five individual world marks. The 14-time Olympic gold medalist swam the two-lap final in 50.22 seconds at the Indiana University Natatorium. He lowered Ian Crocker's mark of 50.40, set at the 2005 world championships in Montreal. Phelps holds world records in the 100 and 200 butterfly, 200 and 400 individual medley, and the 200 freestyle.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was like any other Friday morning for Chris Johnson, a volunteer at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University: Help clean the butterfly exhibit, feed the insects, check to see if any new ones emerged overnight. Black ones, red ones, spotted ones, and -. Whoa. As Johnson watched, an adult butterfly unfolded wings that were deep brown with tan spots on the right side, and black with a border of jade, violet, and light-blue on the left. Johnson knew that the creature, which had been shipped from Malaysia in its pupal stage, was a gynandromorph: half male and half female.
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | By John Roach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Holy Ghost Prep senior Tim Melinson entered Friday's PIAA District 1 Class AA 100-yard butterfly as the eighth seed, a placement that didn't earn him a spot in the top-qualifying heat at the University of Pennsylvania's six-lane Sheerr Pool. So when Melinson ripped off a time of 53.48 seconds, he had to wait for the results of the final heat to see whether he won the event, even though his own time broke the Class AA meet record of 53.76. Melinson ended up with a second-place finish.
SPORTS
January 20, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Matt Zelen dived into the pool to start the 100-yard butterfly, then remembered something. He'd forgotten to tie his racing suit. When the St. John's University junior felt his suit sliding off in the Collegeville, Minn., pool, he decided to kick it off and finish the race. Zelen, a contender for the 2000 Olympics, would have won the race at the College of St. Benedict/St. John's University Invitational on Saturday night by more than two seconds. But Zelen was stripped of more than just his suit - he was disqualified for violating a uniform code.
NEWS
June 23, 2008
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania National Guard plans to offer free guided tours of a rare butterfly colony at Fort Indiantown Gap in Lebanon County. The guard says the fort is the home of the only viable colony of regal fritillary butterflies in the eastern United States. The tours are to begin at 9 a.m. on July 4, 5, 14 and 21, and at 1 p.m. on July 13. - AP
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SPORTS
August 3, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
On a muggy Midwest night in June, Kelsi Worrell climbed out of an Omaha pool as an Olympian. The Century Link Center scoreboard, which after the 100-meter butterfly final flashed a "1" next to her name, confirmed that. Walking off the deck, one hand covering a mouth still open wide in joy and surprise, she spotted her family. That's when she cried, the same way Olympic champions often do when the National Anthem plays, and their country's flag rises slowly above their heads. If Worrell, a Westhampton, N.J., native, finds herself atop a medals podium next week at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, it won't be any more improbable than the journey that took her there.
SPORTS
July 1, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
OMAHA, Neb. - Kelsi Worrell arrived at the 2016 U.S. Olympic swimming trials with almost no international experience. That will change in Rio. The Mount Holly swimmer, a 22-year-old Louisville student, earned an Olympic spot by winning the 100-meter butterfly earlier this week in her initial trials appearance. On Wednesday night she qualified for the 200 final, though her time of 2 minutes, 8.94 seconds was just fourth best in the two semifinals. "That last 50 was really hard," she said, referring to a stretch battle with winner Hali Flickinger.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
Tucked between sleek urban office buildings and the historic red brick of Center City is now a taste of wildlife. On Wednesday, a team of high school students with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service planted flowers in a plot they have been working on since March. The area, several feet of dirt between a stone wall and benches just outside the Free Quaker Meeting House at Fifth and Arch Streets, was once just fallen leaves and soil riddled with English ivy. Now, this strip of Independence National Historical Park is blooming with bee balm, a stringy red petal flower that hummingbirds like to poke their beaks into, and purple coneflowers, a favorite of bees.
NEWS
April 19, 2016
THE DAILY NEWS Pet of the Week is Max, a 1-year-old male brindle pit-bull mix at the Pennsylvania SPCA. Although shy at first, Max warms up quickly, wagging his tail and become more and more social. With time, Max will likely open up and become comfortable, since his demeanor is even happier in the presence of other dogs. Max is a sweet, yet tentative dog, who likes bones and treats, and would do best in a house with tweens and up. Call the PSPCA at 215-426-6300; stop by the shelter at Erie Avenue near B Street, North Philadelphia, or visit pspca.org.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
IF YOU'RE IN Mayfair in May, you might want to look for a new crop of monarch butterflies. They will be part of the Mayfair Monarch Project, an effort to increase the number of monarch butterflies in North America, and spruce up the corridor between Mayfair and Holmesburg. The project is the brainchild of Steve Kanya, who for 24 years has operated a not-so-little shop of critters called the Insectarium in Holmesburg. In a few weeks, Kanya plans to unveil a new Butterfly Rainforest Pavilion inside the 8,000-square-foot warehouse behind his existing business and museum.
NEWS
February 29, 2016
On Feb. 20, Bancroft hosted its 23rd annual Butterfly Ball. More than 530 guests truly had a ball, enjoying an evening of socializing, shopping, dining, and dancing at the festive Vie in Philadelphia. Bancroft is a leading facility in serving those with autism, acquired brain injuries, and varied intellectual and developmental disabilities. Guests were inspired by stories told by board member Adam Landau about philanthropist Ray Welsh, a former Bancroft board member and campaign chair who recently died and whose kindness will forever be remembered.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2016
When I first visited John Lyles and Neel Kulshreshtha three years ago, their business survival seemed a real long shot. They were two unknowns out to make a mark with an electric head shaver in a world dominated by such household names as Philips Norelco, Remington, and Braun. They're unknowns no more. Their company, South Jersey-based Skull Shaver L.L.C., has "low-seven-figures" sales, largely through Amazon.com and, increasingly, its own website, skullshaver.com, said Kulshreshtha, president and CEO. Many of those sales are of their men's shaver, the Bald Eagle, even though the women's shaver, the Butterfly, has had exposure on the nationally syndicated talk shows The Real and The Doctors . In December, Skull Shaver made its first bricks-and- mortar appearance in nearly 40 Bed Bath & Beyond stores in the United States.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a clear blue sky Friday, fourth-grader fingers busily dug in the sun-warmed earth outside the Katz Dalsey Academy Charter School in Camden's Rosedale section. Their mission: Planting a butterfly garden in honor of their school's founders, the late Lewis Katz and Marcy Dalsey. Sabiel Gomez, 9, one of the planters, deemed the project fitting. "I thought it would be kind of nice for them, because they built our amazing school," Gomez said. If Katz and Dalsey were listening, they'd be smiling.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their critical food source - native milkweed - isn't a weed but a native perennial plant. For the delicate and colorful monarch butterfly, the leaves offer food for its larvae and the bright flowers produce nectar for the adults. But milkweed has been nearly eradicated across large portions of the country, threatening the butterfly's annual 2,000-mile transcontinental migration from Canada to Mexico. Monarch numbers have declined in New Jersey and Pennsylvania in recent years, and dropped by 90 percent over the last 20 years at their final destination.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was like any other Friday morning for Chris Johnson, a volunteer at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University: Help clean the butterfly exhibit, feed the insects, check to see if any new ones emerged overnight. Black ones, red ones, spotted ones, and -. Whoa. As Johnson watched, an adult butterfly unfolded wings that were deep brown with tan spots on the right side, and black with a border of jade, violet, and light-blue on the left. Johnson knew that the creature, which had been shipped from Malaysia in its pupal stage, was a gynandromorph: half male and half female.
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