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Buttermilk

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FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes about 18 4-inch Lovecakes 2 large eggs, separated 1 cup buttermilk 2 tablespoons melted    butter 1 cup cake flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon baking    powder 1/2 teaspoon baking    soda 1/4 teaspoon salt Vegetable oil 1. Whisk the egg yolks into the buttermilk in a medium mixing bowl. Whisk in the butter. Put the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a sieve and sift into the buttermilk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Anna Herman
3 cups unbleached white flour ½ cup granulated sugar 1½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda Pinch of salt 1½ sticks of cold butter, cut into tablespoon-sized pieces 1 large egg 1 cup whole-milk buttermilk     1. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl, or bowl of food processor. Stir or pulse till combined. Add the butter chunks to the flour mixture and with either your fingers or two knives work the butter into the flour until the butter pieces are the size of peas and are well coated and distributed evenly.
FOOD
July 12, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I enjoy drinking buttermilk. What is the nutritional value and calorie content of buttermilk? Is it high in fat? - Helen Dear Helen: Good news for buttermilk lovers! Buttermilk is low in fat and high in flavor. Its rich texture is especially satisfying, but it averages about 1 gram of fat and 90 to 100 calories a cup. People who have difficulty digesting lactose (milk sugar) can sometimes drink buttermilk because the lactose has been converted to lactic acid. Besides drinking buttermilk straight, you can also use it in baked goods calling for sour milk, buttermilk, yogurt or sour cream.
FOOD
October 29, 2009
Makes 12 (6 servings of 2 pancakes each) 1. Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl and set aside. 2. In another bowl, combine buttermilk, cream, egg yolks, and butter. 3. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or cast-iron frying pan over medium heat. When a drop of water beads up and sizzles on the griddle, it is hot enough. 4. Combine the two bowls of ingredients and stir just until blended, but lumps remain. 5. Whip the egg whites to a medium peak and fold them in gently.
FOOD
August 1, 1993 | By Leslie Land, FOR THE INQUIRER
Say "summer goodies from the dairy" and the first foods that pop into mind are likely to be milkshakes and ice cream. But hot weather is also the time for buttermilk and yogurt, gently "soured" products whose mild tang and low fat content are just right for beating the heat. Buttermilk, for instance, has come into wide use as a base for low-fat salad dressings. Creamy and sharp at the same time, it's oil and vinegar in one. It also makes great cold soup; just add vegetable puree and thin with chicken or vegetable broth.
FOOD
March 18, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: When a recipe calls for buttermilk, can yogurt be used instead? - Terry Yogurt can be substituted quite successfully for buttermilk; however, it can change the texture of some baked goods. For example, buttermilk pancakes made with yogurt instead of buttermilk tend to be fluffier. The differences are fairly minor, so feel free to experiment. Simply use an equal measure of yogurt for what the recipes calls for in buttermilk. No additional changes are necessary. Dear Polly: When I first read your article requesting readers' ideas of luxury, I first thought of luxury as sunning oneself on the deck of a cruise ship or being chauffeur driven in a Rolls-Royce.
FOOD
March 4, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Do you have a safe, non-bleach cleaner for the grout between my bathroom tiles? I cannot stand the smell of bleach and all the commercial cleaners contain it. - Mrs. F.C. Bleach is the fastest and easiest cleaner for tile grout; not only does it remove stains, but it also kills the mildew spores that can cause staining. However, you might try one of the following gentler cleaners. Be forewarned, however, that you may have to apply a bit more elbow grease with these: Spread on a paste of 3 parts baking soda to 1 part water.
NEWS
February 1, 1987
The Jan. 23 article by Michael Capuzzo about the Reading Terminal Market and about Spataro's buttermilk and sandwich stand in particular was heartwarming and a delight to us oldtimers who have been faithful customers for many years. When I say "many" I believe I am qualified, since I started bringing home buttermilk for my father from the same stand (Stevens' then) before even the First World War. My school was at 8 S. 12th St., and I came into town on the Reading from Frankford, starting in the fall of 1913 - I was 9 years old. So I guess I qualify.
FOOD
November 2, 1988 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can I leave my rosemary in the garden over the winter? It does get quite cold and snowy here, but I've had good luck with tarragon, parsley and other herbs. - S.N. Dear S.H.: Rosemary is not hardy in very cold winters. It's best to pot it up and bring it indoors for the winter. There, you'll have it handy to use in the kitchen throughout the year. Be sure to keep it in a sunny window. Next spring, you can either plant it in the garden to encourage bigger growth or simply set the pot outdoors.
FOOD
June 16, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food Network chef Tyler Florence never overlooks the little things in life. In 2009, he whipped up Sprout, a successful organic baby food line (available at select Wegmans and Whole Foods), and just this month, he released a kid-focused cookbook, Start Fresh: Your Child's Jump Start to Lifelong Healthy Eating (Rodale Books), geared toward parents who are busy but who actually have tastebuds. We couldn't resist this crowd-pleaser remake, nor the fact that you get a complete meal on one pan.   Halibut Fish Sticks With Green Beans and Potatoes Serves 4 adults or 6 kids 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk 1 pound skinless halibut fillet, cut into 1-inch-wide fingers 1 cup panko bread crumbs 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves Salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 pound assorted baby potatoes, scrubbed and quartered 1/2 pound green beans 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup sour cream 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish 1 tablespoon capers, finely chopped 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
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FOOD
June 6, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Even though the party didn't start till 5 p.m., Christian McKinney's grandmother and younger brother were waiting in the lobby of Lawton Elementary School at 3. "Do you want to help in the kitchen?" I asked Brandon, 9. "Me? he said with incredulous delight. "Mom-mom, Mom-mom, I get to help cook!" he cried, literally jumping up and down. For our last cooking class, each of my fifth-grade chefs had invited two guests for a dinner of buttermilk roasted chicken and pasta salad, the menu chosen from their favorite dishes of those we had cooked over the last nine weeks.
FOOD
May 10, 2013 | By Christopher Hirsheimer and Melissa Hamilton, For The Inquirer
A luxurious breakfast in bed is a long-standing Mother's Day tradition. It rates higher than an orchid corsage, or brunch in a crowded restaurant sipping a flat mimosa. We prefer home cooking, anyway. Over the years we've each made many breakfasts for our own mothers, and our lovely daughters have paid us back in kind - the beat goes on. As it always has, going back to ancient Egypt, when spring festivals honored the female deities and maternal goddesses, symbols of rebirth and motherhood.
FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes about 18 4-inch Lovecakes 2 large eggs, separated 1 cup buttermilk 2 tablespoons melted    butter 1 cup cake flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon baking    powder 1/2 teaspoon baking    soda 1/4 teaspoon salt Vegetable oil 1. Whisk the egg yolks into the buttermilk in a medium mixing bowl. Whisk in the butter. Put the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a sieve and sift into the buttermilk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Anna Herman
3 cups unbleached white flour ½ cup granulated sugar 1½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda Pinch of salt 1½ sticks of cold butter, cut into tablespoon-sized pieces 1 large egg 1 cup whole-milk buttermilk     1. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl, or bowl of food processor. Stir or pulse till combined. Add the butter chunks to the flour mixture and with either your fingers or two knives work the butter into the flour until the butter pieces are the size of peas and are well coated and distributed evenly.
FOOD
June 16, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food Network chef Tyler Florence never overlooks the little things in life. In 2009, he whipped up Sprout, a successful organic baby food line (available at select Wegmans and Whole Foods), and just this month, he released a kid-focused cookbook, Start Fresh: Your Child's Jump Start to Lifelong Healthy Eating (Rodale Books), geared toward parents who are busy but who actually have tastebuds. We couldn't resist this crowd-pleaser remake, nor the fact that you get a complete meal on one pan.   Halibut Fish Sticks With Green Beans and Potatoes Serves 4 adults or 6 kids 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk 1 pound skinless halibut fillet, cut into 1-inch-wide fingers 1 cup panko bread crumbs 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves Salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 pound assorted baby potatoes, scrubbed and quartered 1/2 pound green beans 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup sour cream 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish 1 tablespoon capers, finely chopped 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
FOOD
May 26, 2011
Makes 2 servings 2 (6-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breasts 2 cups buttermilk 4 slices bacon 2 cups canola oil 1 cup all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons cornstarch 3/4 teaspoon sea salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 artisan hoagie rolls 2 teaspoons unsalted butter 4 teaspoons dijonnaise (see note) Romaine lettuce 1 red ripe tomato, sliced   1. Place the chicken in a small nonreactive bowl and cover with the buttermilk.
FOOD
October 29, 2009
Makes 12 (6 servings of 2 pancakes each) 1. Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl and set aside. 2. In another bowl, combine buttermilk, cream, egg yolks, and butter. 3. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or cast-iron frying pan over medium heat. When a drop of water beads up and sizzles on the griddle, it is hot enough. 4. Combine the two bowls of ingredients and stir just until blended, but lumps remain. 5. Whip the egg whites to a medium peak and fold them in gently.
NEWS
December 7, 2003 | By Robin B. Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
People vacationing here usually compile a checklist of runs to ski or snowboard on, and things to do during a week's visit, but it's a good bet they have not skied the Wall of Death, launched off Bear Jump, careered around a corner on a snow bike, or tackled the unforgiving grind rail of Voice Change. Not on your checklist? Obviously, you are not a teenager or a child. You haven't explored Buttermilk Mountain. And you don't have a copy of the latest kids' trail map, the official guide to the tree trails, SuperPipe, and the longest slopestyle terrain park in North America.
FOOD
June 5, 2003 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Confession Hello, my name is Craig and I am a mozzarella-holic. Mozzarella is one of the loveliest things I know, especially on a warm summer day when I cut a tender ball of that pure white cheese into slices so thick that I can sink my teeth right in. Usually I stack them with luscious rounds of ripe tomato, fragrant basil leaves, and an indulgent drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil. But I've also been known to ravage a ball of it...
FOOD
September 6, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
What: Mama Mary's Homestyle Pancakes Maker: Spartan Foods of America Where: Supermarket dairy cases Size: 16.5 ounces, 6 (6-inch) pancakes Price: $2.99 Introduced last year, these nonfrozen refrigerated pancakes go into national distribution next month. They are ready-to-eat, plate-size adult pancakes, which heat in 30 seconds by microwave. Good nutrient balance makes these perfect for quick breakfasts. Each pancake has 180 calories, 4 grams of fat and 460 milligrams sodium (from leavening agents)
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