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Butternut Squash

FOOD
October 11, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Usually vegetables and desserts are opposed in an either/or kind of way - as in eat the former or you won't get the latter. These days, however, pastry chefs are digging deep for inspiration and whipping up dishes that are definitively both. Take Peter Scarola at R2L, who has manipulated fennel, endive, parsnip, and squash to do his sweet bidding. "Vegetables can make dessert a bit lighter but also more adventuresome," he says. "Used in the right way, they can also be a nice alternative to what we think of as classic recipes and create a surprise element.
FOOD
November 27, 1994 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
Wild rice is not as wild as it once was, and it is really not rice. So, how did it get its name? One theory is that when 17th-century French explorers first encountered the grain in North America, they called it folle avoine, or "crazy oats. " The term wild rice may have come into use later because of the grain's similarity to common rice. Wild rice is self-propagating in the lakes and rivers in the northern Great Lakes region. Today, most of the wild rice found in our markets is cultivated in man-made paddies in Minnesota and California.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2011
Here's a sampling from "Chew the Right Thing: Supreme Makeovers for 50 Foods You Crave. " Hungry Girl Lisa Lillien uses specific brands of processed foods in her recipes but in a way that minimizes their caloric impact. SUPER-CHEESY ALL-AMERICAN BREAKFAST BAKE 2 cups fresh spinach leaves 1/2 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute 1 wedge The Laughing Cow Light Original Swiss cheese 1 slice fat-free American cheese 1 slice extra-lean turkey bacon Salt and pepper to taste Nonstick cooking spray Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2009 | Associated Press
Asked to create recipes to tempt young palates, Rachael Ray came up with a lasagna bake she described as "a dream, rich, simple and delish. " It's easy to make and is loaded with 3 pounds of spinach and chard. 4 tablespoons ( 1/2stick) butter 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour 3 cups milk Salt and ground black pepper, totaste Ground nutmeg, to taste 1 1/2 cups grated Parmigiano- Reggiano, divided 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 garlic clove, cracked 1 bunch green chard, stems removed and leaves roughlychopped 2 pounds spinach, tough stems removed and leaves roughlychopped 12-ounce box no-boil lasagna noodles Heat the oven to 375 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008
Here are a few recipes from World Cafe Live Chef Matthew Babbage. The spicy chicken dish was served for a Todd Rundgren show, while the bisque went down easy when the Subdudes were in town. When Canadian Dancehall Queen Simone performed here, smoked turkey wings and collard greens were on the menu. ROCKIN' CHILI PEPPER CHICKEN WITH PEANUT SAUCE One 2 1/2-3 pound chicken, backbone removed and wing tips cut off 1 cup chili oil with ground red pepper (recipe below)
FOOD
January 27, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
You could say that getting things done is the marrow of Alfonso Contrisciani's soul. He's up each weekday before the sun checks in and his workday doesn't quit until 10 p.m. Sometimes (that really means most times) even later. All of this is simply routine to him. But that's because he's an executive chef and the father of three young children, with a fourth on the way. "I have to get the kids off to school by 7, my wife, Josee, is an emergency room nurse, and then I get in here at about 9 or 9:30.
FOOD
December 19, 2001 | By Maria Gallagher FOR THE INQUIRER
When Francis Trzeciak was growing up in Metz, a midsize city in the Alsace-Lorraine region of northeastern France, Christmas Eve meant waiting for P?re No?l, the benevolent bearer of gifts, while worrying that his ill-tempered alter ego, P?re Fouettard, might show up instead to deliver a spanking. Trzeciak, the 39-year-old chef-owner of the Birchrunville Store Cafe in Birchrunville, Chester County, has vivid recollections of the holiday foods of his childhood: sparkling pear and apple ciders, icy oysters, crisp-skinned roasted ducks, and tiny cappelletti pasta filled with ground chicken, nutmeg, eggs and Parmesan cheese.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Ish has always been content to lounge in the yard with his owner, occasionally showing his "silly side" by zipping around the house before slumping down in front of the screen door to gaze outside. "He just fits me," said Stephanie Stepansky, of Harrisburg, who purchased the orange-flecked bearded dragon from a pet store six years ago, at age three months. But in January, Ish went from leaping lizard to lump. His normal fervor for daily playtime became uninterrupted rest in the log hollow within of his 75-gallon tank.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Elyssa East, For The Inquirer
They appear every autumn, just as the days start to grow noticeably shorter and the light takes on a golden hue: squat orbs in varying shades of orange that suggest all the warmth and hospitality of the harvest, the joy of a season that is about reaping our hard-earned rewards. Enter the pumpkin, America's most cherished autumn fruit. Yes, like the tomato, the pumpkin is a fruit - the part of the plant that contains the seeds - cast in the role of vegetable. And while everyone knows and loves the bigheaded orange guy, a cornucopia of pumpkins in a surprising range of colors (blue!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Of all the challenges a modern restaurant can tackle, refining simple dishes may be the hardest to master. Capturing that essence in a little clay crock - a few thin slivers of lightly battered eggplant, for example, artfully layered with fresh tomatoes, basil and mozzarella, then wood-roasted without turning to mush - is the rustic magic of places like Badolato. That's the walled Calabrian village beside the Ionian Sea where Toto Schiavone spent his childhood watching his mama make lunch with produce picked that morning from the family farm.
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