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Butterscotch

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FOOD
September 20, 2012
I'll choose pie any day over cake (not to mention cupcakes), so it was with great anticipation that I waited for Magpie to finally open its adorable "nanna chic" cafe on South Street. If my first buttery bites of designer-turned-baker Holly Ricciardi's delights are any indication, we've embarked on a wonderful new trend. From the flaky-crusted slab pies filled with plum and almond, orange-blossom-scented peach, or apples laced with pink peppercorn-touched salted caramel, to a savory cup-shaped potpie crust brimming with creamy tarragon-infused chicken velouté, these homey-yet-sophisticated pies display smart handcraft and a sense of seasonal creativity.
SPORTS
April 25, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Ottawa Mayor Bob Chiarelli can already taste the butterscotch Krimpets. Not so fast, said Mayor Street, who expects to sample BeaverTails for the first time. BeaverTails are hot pastries with cinnamon, chocolate and apple toppings. Chiarelli and Street have a friendly wager on the Eastern Conference semifinal series between the Flyers and the Senators: Tastykakes for Chiarelli if the Flyers lose, BeaverTails for Street if they win. Last year, when Ottawa eliminated the Flyers in the first round, Street paid up. "I want to put my order in for more chocolate and butterscotch Tastykakes this year," Chiarelli said.
FOOD
October 5, 1994 | By Robin Benzle, FOR THE INQUIRER
My husband, Eric, recently brought home a gift for me from Cleveland's open-air West Side Market: a 40-pound case of ripened bananas that he picked up for $3. I can't say that 120 bananas have ever topped my wish list, but I nevertheless accepted them with all the fake enthusiasm I could muster. In my spare time, perhaps I could whip up 50 loaves of banana bread. Yes, I thought, if I take a few days off work, stop doing laundry and skip sleep, it could be done. But the best part of this gift was yet to come.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Remember when wine became popular enough to be "the new beer"? And then it flipped when craft beer became "the new wine"? It was inevitable the two would collide someday into one crazy fermented creature, and now we have it, an all-out "Bine" Revolution with everyone from Sonoma (Russian River) to Portland, Maine, (Allagash) aging beer in wine barrels. Victory is the latest to go grape guns on their brews, with the recent limited release of White Monkey, their popular Golden Monkey tripel aged three months in used chardonnay casks from Wente Vineyards.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
Ron Washington lives each day with a warm smile, a friendly wave, a few kind words and a pocketful of butterscotch drops. The smiles, waves and words are for everyone. The butterscotch drops he saves just for the women. To many of the hundreds of people who pass through the parking lot on the northeast corner of 17th and Vine streets, Washington is known as "Mr. Have A Nice Day. " Some people go out of their way to pass Washington's way, just so they can start their day with a friendly greeting from the 42-year-old Vietnam veteran.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
Ron Washington lives each day with a warm smile, a friendly wave, a few kind words and a pocketful of butterscotch drops. The smiles, waves and words are for everyone. The butterscotch drops he saves just for the women. To many of the hundreds of people who pass through the parking lot on the northeast corner of 17th and Vine streets, Washington is known as "Mr. Have A Nice Day. " Some people go out of their way to pass Washington's way, just so they can start their day with a friendly greeting from the 42-year-old Vietnam veteran.
FOOD
October 8, 2009
The early fall is gouda time in my kitchen. There's something about the fresh chill that demands a firmer, richer cheese, and few deliver complexity and concentrated creaminess quite like Dutch gouda. You can taste a wide selection at Salumeria in the Reading Terminal Market, which often has a half-dozen varieties. The "classic" from Beemster is still young enough to retain a creamy chew, but with at least 18 months of age, this cow's milk cheese (from herds grazed on sub-sea-level Netherlands grass)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Vigil , by Morris Panych at Lantern Theater, is about a man waiting for an old woman to finally die. He waits and waits; months go by, the seasons change, and still he waits. Watching Vigil I could relate, waiting two hours for a dying play finally to end. Despite the skills of two good actors, the script's gimmick wears thin quickly. Grace (Ceal Phelan) lies in bed, emaciated and silent. Kemp (Leonard C. Haas), presumably her nephew, chatters and whines about his dissatisfactions, his grudges, his lack of friends, his unloving parents, his longing for affection, his asexuality, all of which reveals his stunted personality: A more boring and unpleasant person you could not hope to meet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Ice cream and water ice, we want to believe, are forever. But like so many other things, those tasty treats can succumb to the fates of leveraged buyouts, the real-estate boom, and corporate cutesiness. Former Philadelphia firefighter Bob Tumolo last year sold Rita's, the water ice franchise chain he founded 20 years ago, to a Pittsburgh investor. The magnificent Honey Bubbles ice cream parlor, which induced many a road trip to Long Beach Island because of its 100-plus creative toppings and add-ons, is leveled, to be replaced by yet another upscale housing development.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Remember when wine became popular enough to be "the new beer"? And then it flipped when craft beer became "the new wine"? It was inevitable the two would collide someday into one crazy fermented creature, and now we have it, an all-out "Bine" Revolution with everyone from Sonoma (Russian River) to Portland, Maine, (Allagash) aging beer in wine barrels. Victory is the latest to go grape guns on their brews, with the recent limited release of White Monkey, their popular Golden Monkey tripel aged three months in used chardonnay casks from Wente Vineyards.
FOOD
September 20, 2012
I'll choose pie any day over cake (not to mention cupcakes), so it was with great anticipation that I waited for Magpie to finally open its adorable "nanna chic" cafe on South Street. If my first buttery bites of designer-turned-baker Holly Ricciardi's delights are any indication, we've embarked on a wonderful new trend. From the flaky-crusted slab pies filled with plum and almond, orange-blossom-scented peach, or apples laced with pink peppercorn-touched salted caramel, to a savory cup-shaped potpie crust brimming with creamy tarragon-infused chicken velouté, these homey-yet-sophisticated pies display smart handcraft and a sense of seasonal creativity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Vigil , by Morris Panych at Lantern Theater, is about a man waiting for an old woman to finally die. He waits and waits; months go by, the seasons change, and still he waits. Watching Vigil I could relate, waiting two hours for a dying play finally to end. Despite the skills of two good actors, the script's gimmick wears thin quickly. Grace (Ceal Phelan) lies in bed, emaciated and silent. Kemp (Leonard C. Haas), presumably her nephew, chatters and whines about his dissatisfactions, his grudges, his lack of friends, his unloving parents, his longing for affection, his asexuality, all of which reveals his stunted personality: A more boring and unpleasant person you could not hope to meet.
FOOD
October 8, 2009
The early fall is gouda time in my kitchen. There's something about the fresh chill that demands a firmer, richer cheese, and few deliver complexity and concentrated creaminess quite like Dutch gouda. You can taste a wide selection at Salumeria in the Reading Terminal Market, which often has a half-dozen varieties. The "classic" from Beemster is still young enough to retain a creamy chew, but with at least 18 months of age, this cow's milk cheese (from herds grazed on sub-sea-level Netherlands grass)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Ice cream and water ice, we want to believe, are forever. But like so many other things, those tasty treats can succumb to the fates of leveraged buyouts, the real-estate boom, and corporate cutesiness. Former Philadelphia firefighter Bob Tumolo last year sold Rita's, the water ice franchise chain he founded 20 years ago, to a Pittsburgh investor. The magnificent Honey Bubbles ice cream parlor, which induced many a road trip to Long Beach Island because of its 100-plus creative toppings and add-ons, is leveled, to be replaced by yet another upscale housing development.
SPORTS
April 25, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Ottawa Mayor Bob Chiarelli can already taste the butterscotch Krimpets. Not so fast, said Mayor Street, who expects to sample BeaverTails for the first time. BeaverTails are hot pastries with cinnamon, chocolate and apple toppings. Chiarelli and Street have a friendly wager on the Eastern Conference semifinal series between the Flyers and the Senators: Tastykakes for Chiarelli if the Flyers lose, BeaverTails for Street if they win. Last year, when Ottawa eliminated the Flyers in the first round, Street paid up. "I want to put my order in for more chocolate and butterscotch Tastykakes this year," Chiarelli said.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Mars, the Red Planet, is really Butterscotch. After an exhaustive review of 17,050 images from 1997's Mars Pathfinder mission, astronomers are no longer seeing red in the planet next door. "The red planet is not red but indeed yellowish brown" scientists concluded in a report yesterday summarizing the results of the Mars Pathfinder mission. The sky is yellowish brown. So is the dirt. "Colorwise, Mars is rather a drab place," said Peter H. Smith, University of Arizona senior scientist and coauthor of the study published as a special edition of the Journal of Geophysical Research.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Services will be held today for Grover Lee Davis, who worked for 25 years at Rutgers University in Camden in buildings and grounds maintenance. He died last Monday at age 66. Davis lived in the Hunting Park section of Philadelphia with his wife of 34 years, Edith. They had four daughters. For the last 15 years of his Rutgers employment, he worked as a foreman, his daughter Valerie Bridgefourth said. He retired in 1991. "He had a lot of friends and people looked up to him," Bridgefourth said.
FOOD
January 18, 1995 | By Richard Sax, FOR THE INQUIRER
Custard, nothing more than milk and eggs, gently baked until they set. Could anything be simpler, more soothing to the palate, to the stomach, to the soul? Because they are so easy to digest, custards have long been spooned to children, to babies in the nursery and to invalids. One early American recipe is called "a sick bed custard. " There is something inherently nurturing about custards. Unlike desserts with more "texture," custards offer no challenge, no resistance - you can just glide on in with the spoon.
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