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Byard Lancaster

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NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Vernon Clark and Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writers
Byard Lancaster, 70, the Philadelphia jazz musician who earned an international reputation as an avant-garde musical explorer in the 1960s and 1970s, died of cancer Thursday, Aug. 23, at KeystoneCare in Wyndmoor, according to his sister, Mary Ann Lancaster Tyler. In the decades that followed his early fame, he became a local institution, playing saxophone and flute on the streets, in subway concourses, and at clubs around the city. Mr. Lancaster played alto, soprano, and tenor saxophones, as well as flute, clarinet, and piano.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jazz great Byard Lancaster fought the law, and his music won. On the eve of a full-blown trial for disorderly conduct, the Philadelphia Police Department requested the charge against the musician be withdrawn - and it was. Lancaster, 58, was handcuffed and arrested the morning of Nov. 7, accused of playing music in front of a Center City Wawa convenience store. Yesterday, sporting a black-and-white keyboard scarf at the Criminal Justice Center, the Germantown man said he had not even been playing at the store when he was arrested at 17th and Arch Streets.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | Daily News Staff Report
A defiant Byard Lancaster, one of the city's premier jazz musicians, says he's going to continue playing in the streets after a criminal charge against him was dropped yesterday. "If we don't write a law or improve the climate for the musicians, then the city loses, the state loses, the vibe is gone," said Lancaster, 58. "The street becomes sterile. " The versatile Lancaster, who plays many instruments but is known for his expertise with flute and saxophone, was arrested Nov. 7 outside a Wawa market at 17th and Arch streets and accused of disturbing the peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Jazz Columnist
The Jamaican Express has come and gone and deposited Byard Lancaster back in our midst, somewhat the worse for wear. The Germantown reed virtuoso came home recently from a 2 1/2-year teaching commitment in the land of reggae with a smashed left ankle, suffered when a car flipped him for a loop on a street in Kingston. The cast is off but another eight weeks must pass before he can stow the crutches. The accident in no way diminished his embouchure or contiguous parts due southward, as he proved conclusively by ripping off a few cadenzas on his soprano saxophone in my presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A funny thing happened to Monnette Sudler on her way to becoming a folk singer. Early on, she concluded that there was more to the guitar she was strumming than picking out a few chords. The outcome: She became one of the hottest jazz guitarists in the business. Sudler, who will appear Saturday at the Baci Bistro in Center City, was reared in Germantown. Her musical leanings became evident at a young age, when she began piano lessons. The youngster soon switched to guitar, prompting her to begin writing and singing folk songs - but it turned out that jazz was her true calling.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1986 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Guitarist Scott Johnson, drummer Louis Bellson and the combination of alto saxophonist Byard Lancaster and pianist Dave Burrell should provide this week's high notes. I suspect that most jazz listeners are unfamiliar with Johnson, whose music, truth be told, has very little to do with jazz in any conventional sense. Even so, his first album, John Somebody (Nonesuch), released earlier this year, combines rock-and-roll jangle with art-music structural smarts in a beguiling manner that should appeal to intrepid music fans regardless of party affiliation.
NEWS
March 2, 2004 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the idea was to move beyond the blues, then the roots-and-ribs emporium Warmdaddy's succeeded with the Reggae Jazz Explosion on Sunday night. The four-hour Old City concert was anchored by reggae but spun around the globe to take in the striking but limited jazz bagpipes of Rufus Harley, the wild keenings of saxophonist Byard Lancaster, and Harold E. Smith blowing on a hollowed-out log from Australia. Timi Tanzania and the Dubway Reggae Band held down the bandstand most of the night.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Writer
John Coltrane's birthday - the late tenor saxophone exemplar would have been 67 years old yesterday - is a better excuse than most for one of those ad hoc weekend jazz festivals that seem to sprout at certain times of the year, unplanned and unheralded, often to outdo those that are hammered together with considerable sweat and hoopla. We have, this weekend, not one, but two events that invoke the name of this oft-honored jazz votary in their inducements to join the celebratory process.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
CULTURAL CAFE, 2239 N. Broad St., 5 tonight. Tickets: $5 and $10. Info: 215-765-5055. When vibraphonist Khan Jamal appears tonight with poet Sonia Sanchez, he'll have a kindred spirit sharing his passion for the beat. "She has a very beautiful rhythmic quality" to her writing, Jamal said of Sanchez, an award-winning poet, writer and instructor at Temple University. Jamal, himself an award-winning musician, will be playing solo and accompanying Sanchez as she delivers "the spoken word.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
At historic Vernon Park in Germantown, the People's Musical Festival will offer a wide assortment of entertainment - with the emphasis on jazz - on Sunday and Monday. On hand for the free Labor Day weekend event, scheduled from 1 to 9 p.m. each day, will be a heavy lineup of performers influenced by such genres as reggae, Latin, contemporary and gospel in addition to traditional jazz. Scheduled to entertain Sunday are Byard Lancaster, Michal Beckham, Foster Child, Bill Lewis, Ruh, Doctor Gibbs, Rufus Harley, Joe Jefferson, Middy Middleton, Sid Simmons, Birchel Canty Quintet, the Marion Salaam Unit and the Double Portion Ensemble.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Vernon Clark and Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writers
Byard Lancaster, 70, the Philadelphia jazz musician who earned an international reputation as an avant-garde musical explorer in the 1960s and 1970s, died of cancer Thursday, Aug. 23, at KeystoneCare in Wyndmoor, according to his sister, Mary Ann Lancaster Tyler. In the decades that followed his early fame, he became a local institution, playing saxophone and flute on the streets, in subway concourses, and at clubs around the city. Mr. Lancaster played alto, soprano, and tenor saxophones, as well as flute, clarinet, and piano.
NEWS
February 28, 2007 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite the perceptions of some, Jim Miller and Suzanne Cloud are not married - not to each other, anyway. This is true even though they've been working together as musicians and business partners for the better part of two decades, and despite the fact that Miller sometimes refers to Cloud as his "better half. " Miller was running his own jazz record label even before he knew Cloud. But he doesn't consider it to have gotten off the ground until Cloud came aboard in 1986. Though the two are not married, they are parents.
NEWS
August 24, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How could this be? The Orlons, singers of that 1963 Top 10 hit South Street have never performed on South Street. Tonight, that gets fixed. And Charlie Gracie, the original South Philly rocker, will also make his debut on that hippest street, 58 years after he bought his first guitar there, a $15 pawnshop special. They're part of the Brotherly Love All-Star Show, a broad sweep of local talent booked into the TLA, including jazz bagpiper Rufus Harley, sidewalk serenader Byard Lancaster, the Soul Survivors, Nazz frontman Stewkey, Essra Mohawk, Tommy Conwell, the American Dream, and other visitors from the way-back machine.
NEWS
March 2, 2004 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the idea was to move beyond the blues, then the roots-and-ribs emporium Warmdaddy's succeeded with the Reggae Jazz Explosion on Sunday night. The four-hour Old City concert was anchored by reggae but spun around the globe to take in the striking but limited jazz bagpipes of Rufus Harley, the wild keenings of saxophonist Byard Lancaster, and Harold E. Smith blowing on a hollowed-out log from Australia. Timi Tanzania and the Dubway Reggae Band held down the bandstand most of the night.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | Daily News Staff Report
A defiant Byard Lancaster, one of the city's premier jazz musicians, says he's going to continue playing in the streets after a criminal charge against him was dropped yesterday. "If we don't write a law or improve the climate for the musicians, then the city loses, the state loses, the vibe is gone," said Lancaster, 58. "The street becomes sterile. " The versatile Lancaster, who plays many instruments but is known for his expertise with flute and saxophone, was arrested Nov. 7 outside a Wawa market at 17th and Arch streets and accused of disturbing the peace.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jazz great Byard Lancaster fought the law, and his music won. On the eve of a full-blown trial for disorderly conduct, the Philadelphia Police Department requested the charge against the musician be withdrawn - and it was. Lancaster, 58, was handcuffed and arrested the morning of Nov. 7, accused of playing music in front of a Center City Wawa convenience store. Yesterday, sporting a black-and-white keyboard scarf at the Criminal Justice Center, the Germantown man said he had not even been playing at the store when he was arrested at 17th and Arch Streets.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
CULTURAL CAFE, 2239 N. Broad St., 5 tonight. Tickets: $5 and $10. Info: 215-765-5055. When vibraphonist Khan Jamal appears tonight with poet Sonia Sanchez, he'll have a kindred spirit sharing his passion for the beat. "She has a very beautiful rhythmic quality" to her writing, Jamal said of Sanchez, an award-winning poet, writer and instructor at Temple University. Jamal, himself an award-winning musician, will be playing solo and accompanying Sanchez as she delivers "the spoken word.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Writer
John Coltrane's birthday - the late tenor saxophone exemplar would have been 67 years old yesterday - is a better excuse than most for one of those ad hoc weekend jazz festivals that seem to sprout at certain times of the year, unplanned and unheralded, often to outdo those that are hammered together with considerable sweat and hoopla. We have, this weekend, not one, but two events that invoke the name of this oft-honored jazz votary in their inducements to join the celebratory process.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A funny thing happened to Monnette Sudler on her way to becoming a folk singer. Early on, she concluded that there was more to the guitar she was strumming than picking out a few chords. The outcome: She became one of the hottest jazz guitarists in the business. Sudler, who will appear Saturday at the Baci Bistro in Center City, was reared in Germantown. Her musical leanings became evident at a young age, when she began piano lessons. The youngster soon switched to guitar, prompting her to begin writing and singing folk songs - but it turned out that jazz was her true calling.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | By Francis Davis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Asked to describe the best reaction he's ever gotten from an audience, Sonny Sharrock - the first free-jazz guitarist, a combination of John Coltrane and Jimi Hendrix - has a surprising answer. "The first time I went to Europe with (flutist) Herbie Mann (in 1970), a guy in Berlin rushed down the aisle during my solo and started pounding on the stage, screaming 'This is not jazz! This is not jazz! This is not jazz!' " recalled Sharrock, whose band performs at 8 and 10 tonight at the Painted Bride Art Center.
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