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Cabaret

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karen Mason will bring a slick and sophisticated cabaret act to the Barrymore Room in the Hotel Atop the Bellevue on Thursday. She will perform May 14 to 16 and again May 21 to 23. Mason has performed at Carnegie Hall, the Oak Room and the Russian Tea Room in New York, and has just completed a year- long run in the Tony Award-winning Jerome Robbins' Broadway. Her cabaret act includes the songs of Stephen Sondheim, Irving Berlin and other composers. Show times are Thursdays at 8 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Tickets are $18.50; $10 for members of the American Music Theater Festival here; $5 drink or food minimum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1991 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
The June experiment with cabaret at the Hotel Atop the Bellevue was so successful that a fall lineup of cabaret shows has been booked for the hotel's elegant Barrymore Room. Leading off the series is singer Helen Schneider, whose cabaret act featuring the songs of Stephen Sondheim was called "one of the year's most polished and intelligent cabaret shows" by the New York Times. Her shows are Oct. 3-5 and 10-12. Ann Hampton Callaway appears Nov. 7-9 and 14-16 in a show titled Bring Back Romance and featuring the songs of Cole Porter and Cab Calloway.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Weimar Berlin gets a kicky Hollywood sheen in Bob Fosse's coolly decadent 1972 adaptation of the Broadway musical Cabaret, with Liza Minnelli starring (and winning an Oscar) as club diva Sally Bowles, and Joel Grey, all made up and riveting, as the wild-eyed Master of Ceremonies. With the show-stopping numbers "Money" and "Mein Herr," the film brings musical theater to the screen with a vibrancy that's hard to pull off. Fosse figured out the trick, and he flew with it (and nabbed an Oscar for himself, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1994 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
No other musical form celebrates intimacy as compellingly as the cabaret song, with its most private thoughts, feelings and desires. On Sunday, the husband-and-wife team of soprano Jody-Karin Applebaum and pianist Marc-Andre Hamelin performed several gems they've uncovered from cabaret's European golden age, from the late 1800s to just before World War II. The performance, which took place at the Main Line Unitarian Church in Devon, concluded this...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer
JEN CHILDS and Tony Braithwaite don't just finish each other sentences. They also have the apparent ability to beam ideas telepathically to each other by barely uttering a sentence. "What do you . . . ," Childs asked, while scrolling through the in-progress script during a rehearsal of their cabaret-vaudeville hybrid, "Let's Pretend We're Famous. " The show runs tomorrow through March 25 at Plays and Players. "Yeah, yeah! There!" Braithwaite excitedly responded before Childs could say more, leading her to insert an idea neither of them had to articulate.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Marc-Andre Hamelin, known for his venturesome solo piano feats, has embarked on an interesting recording project with soprano Jody Karin Applebaum called Masterpieces of the Cabaret. Saturday at the Germantown branch of the Settlement School, the duo shared their forays into the songbooks of Arnold Schonberg and William Bolcom in front of an audience, as recording engineer George Blood toiled away backstage. A visitor to Saturday's concert (to be repeated in other Settlement branches Friday and Sunday)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
From its very first image - a beckoning finger caught in a tiny spotlight while protruding from an upstage door - to its last, which can't be revealed here but draws audible gasps from the audience, the lewd, depraved show that opened Thursday at the Kit Kat Klub is Cabaret as it was always meant to be. If you thought the 1966 Kander and Ebb musical was pretty lewd and depraved already, with its sleazily amoral Emcee conducting a cynical tour...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"I don't know what people expect from cabaret anymore," said Karen Akers as she bounded up to the bandstand at Odette's Thursday night. What she meant is that just about anything can pass for cabaret these days - just as long as it's sung in front of a small crowd sipping cocktails or cappuccino. But Akers knows what real cabaret is; she embodies it. Stylish and lanky, she is equal parts actress and singer. Her eyes, her long and elegant hands, her body language - they're all pressed into service to help her voice tell a story.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The big-time production of Cabaret that opens at the Forrest Theater tomorrow is a reunion as well as a revival, bringing together several key figures from the original 1966 Broadway show. The list begins with Joel Grey, reprising his role as the leering master of ceremonies at the tawdry Kit Kat Klub, which epitomizes the moral decadence of the Berlin of the 1930s. (The Kit Kat Klub is so tawdry, in fact, that the star has contracted a bad case of laryngitis. Grey will mime his part when the show opens tomorrow night, and his dialogue and songs will be delivered by his understudy, Michelan Sisti.
NEWS
August 13, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
In an Overbrook Avenue home on Saturday night, Wynne Alexander plied her trade in a salon setting. The venue was the Psalm, where artists conduct and discuss their work in a seemingly nondenominational spiritual space. The twinkle of burning candles in Depression glass, the scent of sandalwood: It's all here. Alexander, for the uninitiated, is an unsung heroine of the Philadelphia cabaret scene, an electric pianist and quavering vocalist who, along with drummer Robert Lee, turns the form on its ear with its piquant lit-witty lyricism and its low, rhythm-heavy tones.
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NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
The post-punk cover band was tuning up. The ragtime piano player, his derby hat tilted just so, was hitting the bar. The evening's emcee, dazzling in a costume alighted with glow sticks, rehearsed a poem. It was time for Late Nite Cabaret, the unofficial after-party of the Fringe. First a few words from the man who makes it all happen. "Welcome to Late Nite Cabaret," said Scott Johnston on Thursday, taking the stage at Fergie's Pub, wearing a suit jacket over a Hawaiian shirt and eyeliner.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
W hen Philadelphia's Jilline Ringle died in 2005 from cancer, local theater lost a grand, bawdy presence, a towering (6-foot-2) figure who referred to herself as "a red-headed Amazon from hell, whom all men desire. " At local theater companies 1812 Productions and the Arden Theatre, Ringle wrote shows ( Mondo Mangia ), cowrote them ( Always a Lady , with Jen Childs), and had shows written for her (the Michael Ogborn musicals Box Office of the Damned and Café Puttanesca )
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016
Megan Hilty and Seth Rudetsky play at 8 p.m. Tuesday. Kelli O'Hara and Rudetsky play at 8 p.m. June 14. Both shows are at the Merriam Theater, 250 S. Broad St. Tickets: $29-$125. Information: 215-893-1999, kimmelcenter.org.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
You can't just hang a shingle that reads cabaret and expect audiences to flock to what should be an intimate environment for revelation through song. Musical cabaret artists must dig deep into their lives and memories for what is real and honest, "then dig deeper," says Matt Decker, associate artistic director of the Arden Theatre Company, which this weekend is launching the first season of the Arden Cabaret Series at its Hamilton Family Arts Center. Lead-off performer: actor-singer Jeff Coon.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
TO THE world at large, Alan Cumming is an author as well as an in-demand actor in film, theater, and TV, where he portrays Eli Gold, the Machiavellian campaign manager for Illinois Governor Peter Florrick, played by Chris Noth, on "The Good Wife. " But none of those worlds align with his self-description. "I love writing and telling stories in various forms. I feel like I'm a storyteller when I think of myself," he said in a recent interview with the Daily News . "I think I'm an artist in various forms, but I'm really a storyteller, whether I'm taking a photograph or writing or acting.
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Charles Busch, 61, has been famous forever - "since the French Revolution," he says with a laugh from his Manhattan apartment. Actor, playwright, novelist, and screenwriter; star of his own theater pieces ( Vampire Lesbians of Sodom , Psycho Beach Party ); author of Broadway's The Tale of the Allergist's Wife ; the pro/antagonist of his own scripted flick Die, Mommie, Die! ), Busch makes smartly literate, outrageously funny, exceedingly campy works that borrow liberally from Hollywood's Golden Era, with himself made up to feminine perfection.
NEWS
September 18, 2015
IT'S BEEN a little while since Center City has been home to a venue that showcases fairly big names in a fairly intimate setting. Morgan's Cabaret, located on the second floor of what was then the Prince Music Theater, closed after the 2013-14 season. But the void will be filled beginning tonight as The Rrazz Room opens its doors in the same space previously occupied by Morgan's, in the recently renamed Prince Theater. The Rrazz Room - its oddly spelled handle references the first names of co-owners Robert Kotonly and Rory Paull - is the fourth in the chain of musical hot spots that also includes outposts in New Hope, Miami and Coral Springs, Fla. Like its corporate siblings, the Prince Theater branch will feature both an environment and entertainment aimed at grown-ups.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2015 | By Bruce Klauber, For The Inquirer
Our region has been without an authentic cabaret - loosely defined as a dining venue that offers live entertainment by small groups, most commonly a singer and pianist - since the closing of the Burgundy Room at the Bellevue-Stratford/Fairmont Hotel in 1986, and the demise of Café Lafitte on Drury Lane nine years before that. That will change Sept. 18 with the opening of Robert Kotonly and Rory Paul's the Rrazz Room at the Prince, upstairs at the Prince Theater, and with the November opening in Glenside of Michael Richard Kelly-Cataldi and Dino Kelly-Cataldi's Dino's Backstage & the Celebrity Room.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's some strange plant life putting down roots at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's Pop-Up Gardens this summer: a human-size sprig of poison ivy; a couple of familiar-looking, but unidentified, plants named Mary and Jane Hash. This is not the work of some rogue PHS gardener, though. It's part of a site-specific musical performance - inspired by and staged in the gardens - created by the Bearded Ladies Cabaret. "Bitter Homes and Gardens: A Botanical Hoedown," runs through July 19, moving between the two pop-ups at 15th and South Streets and Ninth and Wharton Streets.
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