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Cabbage

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NEWS
July 29, 1996 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Back in the days when people here did their grocery shopping at Kuroczko's, Rogalski's, Malinowski's and Pruskowski's, Dottie Mocarski met her future husband at the Polish Eagle and went to work just across the street at Lees Carpet and Minter's Candies. The social club, the factories and the mom-and-pop shops are gone now. So are the Polish bars where residents used to stop for beers after work. Like many of their generation, Mocarski's four children have all settled outside Swedesburg, a village of 1,000 sandwiched between the Pennsylvania Turnpike and the now-sleepy mill town of Bridgeport.
FOOD
March 11, 1992 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Food sales this week combine the best of St. Patrick's Day favorites with Lenten specials, notably fish. Right at the top of the list of best buys is cabbage. That extremely healthful cruciferous vegetable is available throughout the area this week at super-bargain prices, such as 12 cents, 9 cents - even 5 cents a pound. Pair it with one of the many corned beef briskets featured in area markets at prices from $1.29 to $3.29 a pound. (Prices vary with the leanness, thickness, and curing method involved.
FOOD
August 28, 2008
Makes one gallon 1.    In a large bowl, dissolve salt in ½ gallon water. Soak cabbage in salt water for 3 to 4 hours. 2.    In the bowl of a food processor or blender, combine garlic, ginger and fish sauce and process until finely minced. 3.    In a large bowl, combine daikon, scallions, garlic-ginger mixture, chili powder, 1 tablespoon salt and sugar, if using. Toss to combine thoroughly. 4.    Remove soaked cabbage from water and rinse thoroughly.
NEWS
July 8, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
A South Philadelphia produce man fell in love with the oranges and cherries of the Atlantic City slot machines and wound up with egg on his face after mortgaging his love affair with a 46-year-old New Jersey woman, the district attorney's office said yesterday. Carmen L. Leckerman, 52, gambled that his girlfriend would not discover he was using one of her properties to borrow money, Assistant District Attorney William H. Wolf Jr. said. "He lost the gamble," said the prosecutor.
FOOD
February 25, 2010
The trickiest part of making stuffed cabbage is separating and preparing the leaves. Most home cooks use the parboil technique: Rinse the exterior of the cabbage and remove a few of the outer leaves. Then heat a large, sturdy pot of salted water over high heat. Insert a large two-pronged fork into the base of a head of cabbage. Once the water boils, submerge the cabbage beneath the water and rotate the fork. The leaves will begin to soften and separate. After this happens you can use a knife to cut the individual leaves off the base and push them away.
FOOD
January 9, 1991 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: When I cook red cabbage, it always fades and turns an awful shade of bluish pink. Is there any way to keep the pretty color of the cabbage? - Mrs. H.C. Dear Mrs. H.C.: Try adding a tablespoon of vinegar to the cooking water. It helps preserve the color. Also, sauteeing instead of boiling the cabbage maintains a better color, especially if the cabbage is only lightly cooked and left a bit crisp (tastier that way, too, to my mind). Dear Polly: Buy yellow lawn chair webbing and make yellow bows out of it to honor our men and women going overseas.
FOOD
January 29, 1995 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
Cabbage is a great choice for winter menus. In this season it is one of the few vegetables that is reasonably priced. Besides, this cruciferous vegetable is highly recommended by nutritionists, and research indicates that it can help protect the body from cancer. In preparing cabbage, many of us tend to fall back on standbys such as coleslaw. Yet for cold weather meals a heartier way to prepare it is much more appealing. Some of us remember our mothers' or grandmothers' satisfying, slowly cooked cabbage dishes, but we hesitate to prepare them as they seem to involve a lot of time and effort.
FOOD
April 3, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Making stuffed cabbage rolls is generally done on weekends, when more time is available. They not only can take from one to 1 1/2 hours to cook, but preparing the leaves can be time-consuming, difficult and frustrating. First, boil some water. Let a head of cabbage rest in it for about 10 minutes, so that the leaves become limp and thus easy to remove without tearing. They also become pliable enough to be rolled around meat without breaking or cracking. And while the cabbage head is in the boiling water, the meat can be mixed and the sauce made.
FOOD
March 7, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
One of the great things about cabbage is that it's available year-round. It's also easy to grow and has a long shelf life. One drawback - to some cooks - is the pungent odor associated with cabbage, a drawback that's easily dealt with. Overcooking is usually the reason for the strong cabbage aroma. If cabbage is cooked quickly, the strong smell will not only be avoided, but the finished product will be crunchy and retain more of its vitamins. The key to fast cooking is shredding the cabbage.
FOOD
February 13, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Cabbage, a good source of Vitamin C, is often overlooked by cooks because they associate this inexpensive and long-keeping vegetable with an offensive cooking odor. Most times, the objectionable odor is created by overcooking - a waste of both time and nutrients. Quick-cooked cabbage will not only free the kitchen from any objectionable odors, but it also will have a bright taste and crisp texture. And prepared in a microwave, cabbage is surprisingly mild and pleasantly crunchy.
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FOOD
February 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Stuffed cabbage recipes are the realm of grandmothers and winter. I grew up with a sweet-and-sour beef and rice version simmered in lemony tomato sauce, just like many other Philadelphians of Jewish descent. We called it prakas, a Yiddish name with roots in Eastern Europe. Whatever your background, there are likely cabbage roll recipes in your family ancestry. Poles have golabki, Czechs and Slovaks call it holubky; Turks and Armenians eat dolmas. In Quebec you can ask for cigares au chou.
FOOD
February 21, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Stuffed cabbage recipes are the realm of grandmothers and winter. I grew up with a sweet-and-sour beef and rice version simmered in lemony tomato sauce, just like many other Philadelphians of Jewish descent. We called it prakas, a Yiddish name with roots in Eastern Europe. Whatever your background, there are likely cabbage roll recipes in your family ancestry. Poles have golabki, Czechs and Slovaks call it holubky; Turks and Armenians eat dolmas. In Quebec you can ask for cigares au chou.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
1 bunch (6 large) scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced 2 (16-ounce) bags coleslaw mix or 1 (16-ounce) bag each of shredded green and shredded red cabbage 1 small red onion, thinly sliced 1/4 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup lemon juice 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger (from about a 1-inch piece) 2 tablespoons white vinegar 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil 2 teaspoons sesame seeds, optional 1 teaspoon salt 20 grinds black pepper   1. Rough up the scallion slices a little with your fingers so all the little layers of the scallion whites separate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2010 | By BARBARA MAHANY, Chicago Tribune
It's time to take back the kitchen insist the authors of a little cookery book - "The Lost Art of Real Cooking" (Perigee, $18.95) - that just might stir up a kitchen revolution. Ken Albala, a culinary historian, and Rosanna Nafziger, a farm-girl-turned-writer, say it's time to reclaim the old-fashioned satisfaction and flavor that comes with cooking from scratch. Here are two recipes from this most charming book.   Basic Citrus Marmalade   The classic marmalade orange is the unpalatably sour Seville orange, but you don't have to have Sevilles for marmalade - sweeter oranges, grapefruits, Meyer lemons and bergamot oranges work fine.
FOOD
October 28, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
We now have JG (for Jose Garces ) Domestic taking its best shot at warming up the chilly lobby of the Cira Centre, the iceberg of an office building tethered, by skywalk, to the classic bones of 30th Street Station. Domestic has a faux farmhouse thing going on - shelves populated by nicked watering cans and countertop balance scales, antique milk bottles and implements designed, blessedly, before the age of the digital readout. There are also, in this multiroom, 175-seat arena, acres of maple-hued pine, both knotty and not. And I'm still weighing whether the decor (there's plaid in there, too)
FOOD
February 25, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Polish call them golabki and Russians golubtsy . In Azerbaijan, they're kelem dolmasi , and generations of Jewish grandmothers called them prakkes . But it is stuffed cabbage all the same. And by any name it is deliciously satisfying on cold winter days. Some recipes use beef, pork, or lamb, rice or barley, onion and parsley. Others add apples, raisins, sauerkraut, bacon, or tomatoes. They're served with an avgolemono or egg-and-lemon sauce in Greece.
FOOD
February 25, 2010
The trickiest part of making stuffed cabbage is separating and preparing the leaves. Most home cooks use the parboil technique: Rinse the exterior of the cabbage and remove a few of the outer leaves. Then heat a large, sturdy pot of salted water over high heat. Insert a large two-pronged fork into the base of a head of cabbage. Once the water boils, submerge the cabbage beneath the water and rotate the fork. The leaves will begin to soften and separate. After this happens you can use a knife to cut the individual leaves off the base and push them away.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Construction could grind to a halt on the Philadelphia Regional Produce Market in Southwest Philadelphia because of a delay by the state legislature in approving millions owed for construction work. The General Assembly has not yet enacted the fiscal 2010 Capital Debt Act, which would authorize millions in new borrowing, affecting hundreds of capital projects statewide. The new market, on Essington Avenue, is strapped with $15 million in unpaid invoices from subcontractors, developer Brian O'Neill said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Starting in June and continuing through the dog days of summer, Hawk Krall - "My full name is James Hawk Krall," he says, "but no one has ever used James" - has stalked the American hot dog in its native habitats, an Audubon of the bun, sketching the specimens he has bagged in his curious and patient hunt. By this month, he'd done portraits of the fried or griddled Texas Wiener (said to have debuted in Paterson, N.J., of Greek parentage); Hawaii's Puka dog, a Polish sausage stuffed in a hollowed-out bun and garnished with pineapple salsa; a creamy Slaw Dog (with spicy chili)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2009
Bryant Terry writes that this tempeh recipe is adapted from one of his favorite cookbooks, "The Modern Vegetarian Kitchen" by Peter Berley. OPEN-FACED BBQ TEMPEH SANDWICH WITH CARROT-CAYENNE COLESLAW 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice 3/4 cup tamari 1/4 cup canned tomato sauce 1 large chipotle chili in adobo sauce 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 cup agave...
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