CollectionsCabinet
IN THE NEWS

Cabinet

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
As the announcer read the news on TV, Little Louie raised his head from the bar and said: "Wha'd he say?" "About what?" asked Slats Grobnik. "Did he say something just now about George Bush?" said Louie. "Yeah, he said that Bush is going to put a Hispanic in his cabinet. " "That's what I thought," said Louie. "Bush must be crazy. That's the most terrible thing I ever heard a politician say. " "What's so terrible about it?" asked Slats. "You got to ask me what's terrible?
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Vice President Bush made an unabashed appeal for votes from Hispanic- Americans yesterday by making a "solemn pledge" to name a Hispanic to his cabinet if he is elected president. Addressing a convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Bush declared "it is long overdue" for the United States to have its first Hispanic cabinet member, and said he was offering "a pledge that I have never made before to anyone, to any group. " "We have had women in the cabinet of the president of the United States and we have had black Americans.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | By Ellen Dean Wilson, Special to The Inquirer
A kitchen cabinetmaker will not be allowed to lease a building at 302 East Linden St. because of a decision last week by the Kennett Square Zoning Hearing Board. The board voted, 2-0, to deny the request of W. Gerald Moore, owner of the building, to lease it to David Price, of the 1100 block of East Baltimore Pike. Board member Peter Waldrof did not vote at Tuesday night's meeting because he was not present when testimony was heard at a Sept. 29 meeting. Zoning for the building's area was changed from commercial to residential in 1986.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Frances D'emilio, Associated Press
ROME - Premier Enrico Letta has harshly criticized a top Italian senator who likened the country's first black cabinet minister to an orangutan, the latest episode of high-profile racial tension in a nation grappling with immigration. In a statement Sunday, Letta denounced Roberto Calderoli's words as "unacceptable" and "beyond every limit. " Calderoli, the Senate's vice president and a leader of the anti-immigrant Northern League Party, made denigrating remarks about Immigration Minister Cecile Kyenge while he was speaking at a party rally Saturday in northern Italy, the populist movement's power base.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Paul Haven, Associated Press
HAVANA - The nominee for U.S. Secretary of State, Sen. John Kerry, once held up millions of dollars in funding for secretive U.S. democracy-building programs in Cuba. Defense Secretary hopeful Chuck Hagel has called the U.S. embargo against the communist-run island "nonsensical" and anachronistic. Both men are now poised to occupy two of the most important positions in President Obama's cabinet, leading observers on both sides of the Florida Straits to say the time could be ripe for a reboot in relations between the longtime Cold War enemies - despite major obstacles still in the way. Kerry's confirmation hearing was held last Thursday, with Hagel's likely to begin next Thursday.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
Gov. Casey this morning named a Philadelphia area woman the state's new secretary of banking. She is Sarah W. Hargrove, 40, of Wyndmoor, a financial analyst and vice president of a Plymouth Meeting-based investment company called the Philadelphia First Group. Formerly a vice president at Philadelphia National Bank, Hargrove is the third woman tapped by Casey for his Cabinet and the first ever to head the Banking Department. The banking secretary oversees a department of about 150 employees and earns $58,000 a year.
NEWS
November 21, 2004
Presidents who are popular and skilled enough to win a second term often clean house in their cabinet before that term starts. The wholesale turnover now taking place in President Bush's cabinet is no different in that respect. But Bush's appointments to fill out his new team reveal a pattern that may not serve him well. Rather than bringing in "new blood" to many of these high-level posts, the President is reaching into his loyal inner circle time and again to fill the jobs. The danger is that an administration already lacking a healthy range of competing voices at the table will become further insulated.
NEWS
November 8, 1987
President Reagan struck an unintended blow for the cause of women's equality last week by naming Ann Dore McLaughlin to head the Labor Department. Previously, Mr. Reagan had allowed only men to take big jobs for which they had almost no credentials. The unworthies included John S. Herrington at Energy, Raymond J. Donovan at Labor and William P. Clark at the National Security Council. It was only fair to toss one of these high-level learning experiences to a woman - in this case a public relations professional with a blank slate on labor issues.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad replaced almost half of his West Bank-based cabinet on Wednesday, a clear sign that efforts to end the Palestinian political split are stuck. A unity deal reached in February was to have ended five years of separate Palestinian governments, one run by Fayyad in the West Bank and the other by the Islamic militant Hamas in the Gaza Strip. Under its terms, Authority President Mahmoud Abbas was to head an interim unity government ahead of presidential and parliamentary elections.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. James J. Florio yesterday called on President-elect George Bush to elevate the Environmental Protection Agency to a cabinet-level department and name a "dedicated, committed environmentalist" to run the agency. Florio, a Democrat, speaking before the Camden Rotary Club, called on Bush to demonstrate his environmental commitment by changing the EPA, which is now part of the Department of Interior, into an independent department. Even though he criticized Bush during the election for his environmental record, Florio yesterday said he had high hopes that the vice president would renew federal anti-pollution efforts.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When Andee Hefler refurbished her farmhouse in Lower Gwynedd, she kept the outside walls intact but gutted the inside. The result: Housed in a 17th-century home is a contemporary kitchen complete with a smorgasbord of automated elements. "My husband, Brad, loves automation, so we put some really fun things in the house," said Hefler, owner of Andrea Lynn Interiors. The smart home's Control4 system operates everything from lighting to raising and lowering the shades to controlling the TV, all by touching buttons on a wall panel in the kitchen doorway.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At farmers' markets this season, alongside the kale and radishes, there are unaccustomed local offerings. Think tulsi bitters for digestion and relaxation, elderberry syrup for immune support, or raspberry leaf tea for pregnant women. Also new to farmers' market shoppers: disclaimers - that the wares are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. " This is an offshoot of the farm-to-table movement: Call it the farm-to-medicine-cabinet movement. It's powered by a new generation of farmer-herbalists like Amanda Midkiff, 26, who last year started Locust Light Farm in New Hope, one of a growing number of farm-based apothecaries in the area.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney has named veteran Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner as deputy managing director for criminal justice. Announcing the appointment Thursday, Kenney cited Lerner's decades of work in the criminal justice system, which includes 16 years as the judge who supervises pretrial matters in every homicide case in the city. "I am confident his passion and expertise will give him the ability to build on our current momentum surrounding the MacArthur grant proposal," the mayor said in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | Daily News Editorial Board
AS THE OLD saying goes: You can judge a man by the company he keeps. Using that as a guide, we have to say that Mayor-elect Jim Kenney is keeping very good company so far. Although he's only partway through the process of filling his Cabinet and key positions in city government, so far Kenney has come up with a strong list of public servants to assist him over the next four years. We can begin with Kenney's earliest appointment: his decision to keep Amy Kurland as inspector general.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | Joe Brandt, Daily News Staff Writer
FIVE YEARS AGO, Nolan Atkinson Jr. made headlines when he successfully petitioned the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to posthumously admit his great-grandfather to the state bar. After being denied admission on the basis of race in 1849, George Boyer Vashon drifted north, becoming the first African-American to practice law in New York, and later the second in Washington D.C. He taught at what would become Howard University but again was denied admission...
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael DiBerardinis, Philadelphia's parks and recreation czar and a longtime cabinet appointee to two mayors, is Mayor-elect Jim Kenney's choice to be his managing director. Kenney is to announce the choice of DiBerardinis for the top cabinet post at a news conference Friday, a city hall source with knowledge of Kenney's decision said. The source spoke on condition of anonymity. DiBerardinis will be one of three high-level appointments to be announced Friday. Currently parks and recreation commissioner and a deputy mayor in the Nutter administration, DiBernardinis will be moving up to a post that the mayor-elect has said will take on more authority.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Schultz Schweiker, 89, a political novice who rose from the unlikely incubator of Norristown to become a U.S. congressman, senator, and secretary of health and human services, died Friday, July 31. Mr. Schweiker died of complications from an infection at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in South Jersey. He had lived in McLean, Va., since 1969. "I am very, very sad to hear that the former senator has passed away," said Frank R. Bartle, former Montgomery County Republican chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
A motion-sensing toilet that lifts the seat and flushes was just what was needed for the Magladry family of Voorhees - two parents and four kids younger than 9. Installed eight months ago, its incorporated night-light was especially appreciated by mom Heather when she was pregnant. "None of my boys remember to flush the potty - ever, it seems - so that's one of the nice things," she said. Most smart toilets ($3,000- $5,000) come from Japan and require their own electrical outlet.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf's nominee to serve as secretary of state faced resistance Tuesday from Republican lawmakers who said he deserved blame for not stopping Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell. After a hearing, the Senate State Government Committee declined to take a position on Pedro Cortes - an unusual step - and instead moved his nomination to the full Senate floor for consideration. The committee chairman, Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon), said after the hearing that the panel was split on Cortes, but that he wanted to give all senators the chance "to make the decisions based on their own conscience.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A onetime Philadelphia public-school teacher and principal enters the spotlight Tuesday as one of the first of Gov. Wolf's cabinet nominees to face scrutiny from legislators. Acting Secretary Pedro Rivera will face questions on his policies and educational approaches from members of the Senate Education Committee. But any hurdles shouldn't be large ones. "I have not heard any concerns that would rise to the level of him not being confirmed," the committee chairman, Lloyd Smucker (R., Lancaster)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|