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BUSINESS
March 19, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The EPA launched yesterday a two-year, $1.9 million study to determine whether hydraulic fracturing, the oil- and gas-production technique used in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale region, is a danger to groundwater supplies. "The study will be conducted through a transparent, peer-reviewed process, with significant stakeholder input," said Paul T. Anastas of the EPA's Office of Research and Development. The process, called "fracking," involves injecting water and chemicals into wells under high pressure to break up the source rock to unlock oil and natural gas. Along with horizontal-drilling technology, it has transformed formerly uneconomical drilling sites into lucrative ones.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RESIDENTS of a northeastern Pennsylvania town who say that their well water was poisoned by a gas driller are nearing a settlement of their long-running and highly contentious federal lawsuit. Court documents filed this week indicate that residents in the tiny community of Dimock Township have agreed to a confidential settlement with Houston-based Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. Dimock became a flashpoint in the national debate over gas drilling and a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, after residents claimed in 2009 that Cabot polluted their water supply with methane gas and toxic chemicals and made some of them violently ill. Cabot denied responsibility.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2013 | By Daniel Wagner, Associated Press
Strong earnings from big U.S. companies pushed the Dow Jones industrial average to a rare triple-digit gain Friday, but the S&P 500 index still posted its first weekly loss of the year. Hewlett-Packard had the biggest gain in the Dow and the Standard & Poor's 500 index. It posted fiscal first-quarter earnings late Thursday that beat all forecasts, a relief after months of bad news for the computer maker. H-P rose $2.10, or 12.3 percent, to $19.20. Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. was the S&P 500's second-best performer, jumping a day after reporting earnings that beat analysts' expectations.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
The editorial "Hold drillers accountable" (Oct. 7) took a predictable - and wrongheaded - position on a recent announcement made by Department of Environmental Protection Secretary John Hanger. For nearly a year, Cabot had been working diligently with DEP to address Carter Road water issues. Hanger told Cabot that the "final solution" to restoring clean water would be installing methane separator systems on the affected water wells. While Cabot does not agree that our activities caused the alleged problems with the well water of certain residents in Dimock Township, we provided potable water for an extended period of time, purchased methane separators, and offered to install them on all water wells deemed by DEP to have been "affected.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the heels of penalizing one natural gas operator $240,000 for contaminating water wells, Pennsylvania's top environmental official Thursday urged the industry to immediately adopt proposed new drilling standards rather than waiting for them to be formally enacted. John Hanger, secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, summoned industry representatives to Harrisburg to discuss new construction standards for wells drilled to tap natural gas reserves. The new guidelines are designed to reduce the chance of incidents such as the one that has contaminated 14 water wells in the Susquehanna County town of Dimock.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection fined a Marcellus Shale operator $240,000 Thursday, ordered it to plug three gas wells, and banned it from drilling for one year in a Susquehanna County community that has been plagued with contaminated water wells. DEP Secretary John Hanger said Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. of Houston had failed to correct problems that caused gas to migrate to 14 residential water wells in Dimock Township. One water well exploded last year, an incident often cited by activists who are seeking a moratorium on drilling.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Virginia Corp. of Radnor on Tuesday reported disappointing production rates on its first three horizontal Marcellus Shale natural gas wells. "The Marcellus Shale test wells had initial production rates which fell short of our expectations," H. Baird Whitehead, the company's chief executive, said in a statement. The test wells in the central part of Penn Virginia's 35,000-acre position in Potter and Tioga Counties are expected to be connected to pipelines in August, when natural gas sales will begin.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
Former governors can choose many career paths. Some of them become college presidents. Some go on the lecture circuit. And then there's Tom Ridge, who is set to become a paid shill for the natural-gas drillers swarming his native state. The Marcellus Shale Coalition, which represents natural-gas companies, has been negotiating to hire Ridge's lobbying firm. The industry wants the ex-governor's help with a campaign to educate the public about the benefits of drilling. It's unclear how much Ridge will be paid, but he doesn't come cheap.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
DIMOCK, Pa. - More than three years after residents in this Susquehanna County town complained that Marcellus Shale natural gas development polluted their private water wells, the lawsuits are getting settled, the activists are going away, and gas drilling is set to resume. But the battle scars are unhealed in Dimock, whose name has become synonymous with hydraulic fracturing - fracking. The rush to drill struck a deep reservoir of hostility. Residents who support or oppose shale-gas development complain that their neighbors are looking for a quick payday, either from gas-drilling royalties or a legal settlement.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., one of the state's most prolific Marcellus Shale natural gas producers, is giving $2.5 million to Lackawanna College in Scranton to boost its School of Petroleum and Natural Gas. The gift is the largest single private donation in the history of the two-year college. Lackawanna College established the school in 2009 in the Susquehanna County borough of New Milford, near the heart of Cabot's drilling activity. "Our partnership with Cabot enhances tremendously the ability of the School of Petroleum and Natural Gas to provide a world-class education designed to prepare a ready workforce that fits the needs of the multiple companies across the industry," Mark Volk, the college's president, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2013 | By Daniel Wagner, Associated Press
Strong earnings from big U.S. companies pushed the Dow Jones industrial average to a rare triple-digit gain Friday, but the S&P 500 index still posted its first weekly loss of the year. Hewlett-Packard had the biggest gain in the Dow and the Standard & Poor's 500 index. It posted fiscal first-quarter earnings late Thursday that beat all forecasts, a relief after months of bad news for the computer maker. H-P rose $2.10, or 12.3 percent, to $19.20. Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. was the S&P 500's second-best performer, jumping a day after reporting earnings that beat analysts' expectations.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
DIMOCK, Pa. - More than three years after residents in this Susquehanna County town complained that Marcellus Shale natural gas development polluted their private water wells, the lawsuits are getting settled, the activists are going away, and gas drilling is set to resume. But the battle scars are unhealed in Dimock, whose name has become synonymous with hydraulic fracturing - fracking. The rush to drill struck a deep reservoir of hostility. Residents who support or oppose shale-gas development complain that their neighbors are looking for a quick payday, either from gas-drilling royalties or a legal settlement.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2012
In the Region Dimock residents near settlement Residents of Dimock Township in northeastern Pennsylvania, who say their well water was poisoned by a gas driller, are nearing a settlement of their long-running and highly contentious federal lawsuit. Court documents filed this week indicate that the residents have agreed to a confidential settlement with Houston-based Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. Dimock became a flashpoint in the national debate over gas drilling and a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, after residents claimed in 2009 that Cabot polluted their water supply with methane gas and toxic chemicals and made some of them violently ill. Cabot denied responsibility.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RESIDENTS of a northeastern Pennsylvania town who say that their well water was poisoned by a gas driller are nearing a settlement of their long-running and highly contentious federal lawsuit. Court documents filed this week indicate that residents in the tiny community of Dimock Township have agreed to a confidential settlement with Houston-based Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. Dimock became a flashpoint in the national debate over gas drilling and a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, after residents claimed in 2009 that Cabot polluted their water supply with methane gas and toxic chemicals and made some of them violently ill. Cabot denied responsibility.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2012 | By Pallavi Gogoi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - It was a day of milestones for the stock market. Stronger corporate earnings reports and expectations that central banks will act to support the economy powered the Standard & Poor's 500 index past 1,400 for the first time in three months. The index rose 7.12 points to close at 1,401.35 on Tuesday. Energy stocks increased the most of the 10 industry groups tracked by the index. The Nasdaq composite index marked a milestone of its own: the first close above 3,000 since early May. The Nasdaq rose 25.95 points to 3,015.86.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil & Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock houses "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Virginia Corp. of Radnor on Tuesday reported disappointing production rates on its first three horizontal Marcellus Shale natural gas wells. "The Marcellus Shale test wells had initial production rates which fell short of our expectations," H. Baird Whitehead, the company's chief executive, said in a statement. The test wells in the central part of Penn Virginia's 35,000-acre position in Potter and Tioga Counties are expected to be connected to pipelines in August, when natural gas sales will begin.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania regulators on Tuesday fined Chesapeake Energy Corp. $1.1 million for natural gas drilling violations, the largest penalty ever in the state's rapidly expanding Marcellus Shale bonanza. Under a consent order signed Monday with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Chesapeake will pay $900,000 for contaminating the private water supplies of 16 residences in Bradford County in northern Pennsylvania. Chesapeake, the largest Marcellus Shale operator, will also pay a $188,000 fine for a Feb. 23 fire at its drilling site in Avella, Washington County, in southwestern Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Rendell called it quits last week on his yearlong effort to enact a Marcellus Shale natural gas tax. But Rendell was not the only loser in the tax debate. The natural gas industry survived Rendell's effort to enact a severance tax on gas production, but its image has been badly battered by a confluence of negative publicity, starting with the tax debate and magnified by the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. "As an industry, we're just doing a horrible job on communication until recently," said Matt Pitzarella, spokesman for Range Resources Corp.
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