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Caddyshack

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NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PEOPLE battling drug and alcohol addiction in Philadelphia are watching Hollywood movies in outpatient group therapy - on your dime.   The tab can exceed $50 a person for each movie, paid by Medicaid. Clients said that some of the movies they saw - like "Caddyshack" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" - had nothing to do with recovery. The films that did depict addiction, including "The Basketball Diaries," starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a heroin addict, and "28 Days," with Sandra Bullock in the throes of alcoholism, made them crave the very substance they are trying to kick, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2010 | By BARRY KOLTNOW, The Orange County Register
As I see it, the world is divided into two distinct camps. There are those who believe that the 1980 film "Caddyshack" is the funniest movie ever made, and then there are those who did not stagger through the 1980s in a drunken stupor. I suppose that sounds a little harsh, but I have grown weary of the praise heaped on this third-rate movie that, in recent days, has been elevated to the level of reverence. The reason is a promotional campaign behind the release of the 30th anniversary edition of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Club Paradise, a potluck comedy, has something for all humor appetites. Robin Williams gorges on wordplay, Andrea Martin compulsively gobbles sight gags and Peter O'Toole, that gentlemanly grazer, nibbles deadpan. While these performers are on screen, this Caribbean carouse has slap-happy appeal. Trying to save a tiny island from development by entrepreneurs, Williams opens a makeshift summer camp passing for a resort, a place that only can be described as Club Meddling. Martin is a princesslike guest who chokes on pride when she learns that she must share a bathroom: "When we said private bath, we meant not open to the general public," explains Williams to Martin's hilarious rage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As an assault on the snooty pretensions of professional golf, Happy Gilmore is relentlessly subpar for the coarse. I never thought or wished to live to see the day when Hollywood came up with a movie that would make Caddyshack seem like the height of sophistication, but Adam Sandler and company have managed it. The PGA tour, complete with true Brit commentators declaring reverently, "The greens have treated him scurvily all day," is arguably a...
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Flash floods? Twisters? Hail the size of - yes - golf balls? If the U.S. Open's opening day in Merion proves the total inundated, storm-tossed washout that forecasters are predicting, here are five duffer-centric cinematic entries to celebrate the sport's transcendental pleaures - safe and dry via your TV, PC, tablet, or smartphone. And even if Tiger Woods et. al. get to play through, you might want to add these titles to your queue. Caddyshack (1980) Chevy Chase tries to score on and off the fairway, Rodney Dangerfield makes ungentlemanly noises, and Bill Murray trolls the Bushwood Country Club grounds on the hunt for Mr. Gopher in Harold Ramis' putt-and-swing send-up.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
I mean no disrespect to Rodney Dangerfield in suggesting that Back to School is a comedy that belongs back on the drawing board. In the climax of the film, Dangerfield clambers up to the platform of a 10- meter diving board. He executes a dive that involves somersaults and pinball bounces off several springboards on the way down. But he can't get Back to School off the ground and, as was the case with Easy Money, this belly-flop of a movie isn't his fault. Even when he's doing a beer commercial with a crowd of aging jocks, Dangerfield stands out. He has only to stare bug-eyed at the camera and start to loosen his collar as if the entire world were threatening to strangle him and the laughter erupts.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
THERE'S A line in the movie "Groundhog Day" that probably sums up how you feel about the recent weather. "I'll give you a winter prediction," says weatherman Bill Murray, condemned to Feb. 2 in Punxsutawney until he learns to love someone other than himself. "It's going to be cold, it's going to be gray and it's going to last you for the rest of your life. " The line was written by Harold Ramis, 69, who died yesterday after a prolonged struggle with an autoimmune disease. You probably know his name, but if you don't, know that Ramis probably made you laugh more than any writer/director/actor of his time.
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WE WERE watching the U.S. Open on TV yesterday afternoon when out of nowhere comes a shot of a groundhog, or gopher, or some such furry creature. That immediately made us think of "Caddyshack," which then made us think of Bill Murray. Who'da thunk they had rodents on the Main Line? Anyway, how cool would it be if Murray was at the Open? We can see him now, traipsing around in his Carl Spackler hat while eating a Baby Ruth and playing in a foursome with the Dalai Lama. On the 18th fairway, Murray pulls out a 1-iron while standing next to the famous Ben Hogan plaque.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | By John H. Richardson, Los Angeles Daily News
They wear pastels. They can't dance. They play golf. They definitely have no sense of rhythm. They're silly and selfish and spoiled. They're WASPs, the latest discovery in the movies' non-stop search for idiots and villains. It has been coming a long time, but in the wake of the big round of year- end film releases, the white Anglo-Saxon Protestant as cold, repressed fool has become so prevalent as to appear to be a cliche. But those depictions aren't likely to disappear anytime soon: they are too safe and convenient a target for filmmakers to give up on them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Forgive it its unwieldy title. Both puttheads and the fairway-averse will be charmed by The Greatest Game Ever Played, an inconsistent and endearing sports inspirational that aims to be Chariots of Fire for golf. While it doesn't achieve this goal, the movie from actor-turned-director Bill Paxton (you saw him in Twister and Apollo 13), who once caddied for links legend Ben Hogan, is an affectionate ode to sportsmanship. The focus of Paxton's chronicle is the 1913 U.S. Open, a tournament in which homegrown athletes fight the Brits to keep the trophy in the States.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
PHILADELPHIA saw some father-son love in the City of Brotherly Love over the weekend, when Bill Murray was in town. La Salle University's Kale Beers , who was doing the broadcast play-by-play during the La Salle/University of Rhode Island basketball game Saturday afternoon at Tom Gola Arena, spotted the "Caddyshack" star in the stands. Murray, incognito under a baseball cap, watched his son, assistant men's basketball coach Luke Murray , help lead the Rhody Rams to a 59-56 win over the Explorers.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PEOPLE battling drug and alcohol addiction in Philadelphia are watching Hollywood movies in outpatient group therapy - on your dime.   The tab can exceed $50 a person for each movie, paid by Medicaid. Clients said that some of the movies they saw - like "Caddyshack" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" - had nothing to do with recovery. The films that did depict addiction, including "The Basketball Diaries," starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a heroin addict, and "28 Days," with Sandra Bullock in the throes of alcoholism, made them crave the very substance they are trying to kick, they said.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
Now whom to call? The passing of Harold Ramis this week was a body blow for many fans, especially later baby boomers. His brilliant writing took the smug, iconoclastic, and chaotic comedy of Saturday Night Live and SCTV and translated it brilliantly for the big screen with massive, generational, crossover appeal. His list of writing and acting achievements reads like a rite of passage for us. His characters' dialogue entered the everyday lexicon - from Carl Spackler in Caddyshack to the accidental hero, Pvt. John Winger (Bill Murray again)
NEWS
February 26, 2014
THERE'S A line in the movie "Groundhog Day" that probably sums up how you feel about the recent weather. "I'll give you a winter prediction," says weatherman Bill Murray, condemned to Feb. 2 in Punxsutawney until he learns to love someone other than himself. "It's going to be cold, it's going to be gray and it's going to last you for the rest of your life. " The line was written by Harold Ramis, 69, who died yesterday after a prolonged struggle with an autoimmune disease. You probably know his name, but if you don't, know that Ramis probably made you laugh more than any writer/director/actor of his time.
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WE WERE watching the U.S. Open on TV yesterday afternoon when out of nowhere comes a shot of a groundhog, or gopher, or some such furry creature. That immediately made us think of "Caddyshack," which then made us think of Bill Murray. Who'da thunk they had rodents on the Main Line? Anyway, how cool would it be if Murray was at the Open? We can see him now, traipsing around in his Carl Spackler hat while eating a Baby Ruth and playing in a foursome with the Dalai Lama. On the 18th fairway, Murray pulls out a 1-iron while standing next to the famous Ben Hogan plaque.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Flash floods? Twisters? Hail the size of - yes - golf balls? If the U.S. Open's opening day in Merion proves the total inundated, storm-tossed washout that forecasters are predicting, here are five duffer-centric cinematic entries to celebrate the sport's transcendental pleaures - safe and dry via your TV, PC, tablet, or smartphone. And even if Tiger Woods et. al. get to play through, you might want to add these titles to your queue. Caddyshack (1980) Chevy Chase tries to score on and off the fairway, Rodney Dangerfield makes ungentlemanly noises, and Bill Murray trolls the Bushwood Country Club grounds on the hunt for Mr. Gopher in Harold Ramis' putt-and-swing send-up.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2010 | By BARRY KOLTNOW, The Orange County Register
As I see it, the world is divided into two distinct camps. There are those who believe that the 1980 film "Caddyshack" is the funniest movie ever made, and then there are those who did not stagger through the 1980s in a drunken stupor. I suppose that sounds a little harsh, but I have grown weary of the praise heaped on this third-rate movie that, in recent days, has been elevated to the level of reverence. The reason is a promotional campaign behind the release of the 30th anniversary edition of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Forgive it its unwieldy title. Both puttheads and the fairway-averse will be charmed by The Greatest Game Ever Played, an inconsistent and endearing sports inspirational that aims to be Chariots of Fire for golf. While it doesn't achieve this goal, the movie from actor-turned-director Bill Paxton (you saw him in Twister and Apollo 13), who once caddied for links legend Ben Hogan, is an affectionate ode to sportsmanship. The focus of Paxton's chronicle is the 1913 U.S. Open, a tournament in which homegrown athletes fight the Brits to keep the trophy in the States.
SPORTS
October 29, 2000 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's a scene in the new movie The Legend of Bagger Vance in which Jack Lemmon, the narrator of this mythical tale of golf, wisdom and life, wonders aloud, "My wife asks me, 'Why do you play a game that seems destined to kill you?' " It's a good and reasonable question, not to mention a line that will no doubt elicit knowing chuckles from golfers everywhere, once the movie, starring Matt Damon and Will Smith, appears in theaters on Friday. Why do we play a game that seems destined to kill us?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As an assault on the snooty pretensions of professional golf, Happy Gilmore is relentlessly subpar for the coarse. I never thought or wished to live to see the day when Hollywood came up with a movie that would make Caddyshack seem like the height of sophistication, but Adam Sandler and company have managed it. The PGA tour, complete with true Brit commentators declaring reverently, "The greens have treated him scurvily all day," is arguably a...
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