CollectionsCaesar Salad
IN THE NEWS

Caesar Salad

ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
John Corrado is an architect. Khaled Hassan is a civil engineer. Michael Santoro is a computer analyst. So what could these three have in common? One, they're brothers-in-law. Two, the trio own and operate Ristorante Ottimo, a new, serene Italian dining place on 16th Street between Walnut and Locust. What possessed employed professionals to take leave of their jobs and jump into the restaurant business? "All three of us have restaurant experience," says Hassan. "We all worked in restaurants while we were going to school.
FOOD
January 12, 1997 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
You don't have to be a marketing expert to know that Caesar salad is the hottest thing between tongs. It has two essential qualities going for it: ease of preparation and flavor. Even the most basic Caesar salad of romaine lettuce, croutons and bottled dressing tastes good. Do it from scratch with good-quality Parmesan cheese, anchovies and extra-virgin olive oil and it's a feast. One of the things you'll note about Caesar salad is how versatile it is. You can make it more substantial by adding strips of grilled chicken or salmon or cooked shrimp; or make it lighter by skipping the traditional coddled egg. You can even take the essential ingredients and replay them in a new form, as Caesar Sandwich.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the waterfront, with its dottering forklifts and lumbering fruit boats, dock workers and truck drivers follow the lunchtime path to a gray school bus decorated with frilly sunflower curtains, folk-art place mats and filled with the radio crackle of Frank Sinatra crooning to the whispering sizzle of coiled sausage. They all come, the gruff, the gregarious, the wharf-rat philosophers. Jim Tucci pulls up in his Conrail train. Al Bowers drops down from the cab of his 18-wheeler.
FOOD
June 9, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
I was fretting just a little that our lunch at Bella Mia had taken well over an hour and a half. It wasn't that the meal hadn't been pleasant, it's just that I had hoped lunch would move along a little faster than our leisurely dinner had here a few days earlier. "Relax," my lunch partner said as I fussed and cussed the traffic impeding my speedy return to work. "Remind yourself that this is how it would be in Italy. " He was right, of course. The Italy I had visited earlier this year was conspicuously unhurried when it came to dining.
FOOD
April 17, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Hey, you can keep your Walnut Street restaurant row with its Center City prices and its Center City pretensions. Bite for bite, I'll take the 7900 block of Oxford Avenue in Fox Chase: Riekers German and Polish delicatessen, Bread Winner's deli, Joseph's (no relation) Pizza, the Old Brauhaus with Spaten Optimator on tap. And Moonstruck, the subject of today's review. Moonstruck has undergone a couple of changes since the early 1980s, when it was Ristorante DiLullo and one of the two or three best restaurants in the Delaware Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1996 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Midnight Express, possibly the only fast-food joint in the world that can make you a Caesar salad and a chicken vindaloo, is to Hong Kong cops what Dunkin' Donuts is to their U.S. counterparts: a place to warm souls chilled by street crime. A place to chow down among familiar faces. A place where everyone knows your name and that you've just been jilted by your girl. Chungking Express, a lyrical and delightfully goofy study in romantic longing, is two stories about two cops who nurse their broken hearts on a diet of Midnight Express grub and wistful fantasies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The ranks of vegetarians are growing. All you have to do is pick up a newspaper or magazine and read all about it. Or flick on the television. And we're all becoming more health-conscious when it comes to eating. You can read about that, too. So why are steak houses popping up like corks at a champagne gala? Easy question. Red meat is hot. Or so goes the slogan at the Palm Restaurant at the Bellevue. So hot, the restaurant, in conjunction with Temple University Center City, will be gourmandizing on the subject of red meat at a night course this spring semester.
FOOD
November 8, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
It's easy to drive right by the Mt. Airy Cafe. Though it's been open a month, the cozy 50-seat restaurant hasn't yet acquired an outdoor sign. The eye-catching coat of sky-blue paint on the building front and a menu posted in the lace-curtained bay window are the only tipoffs that there's a new business on the block. After sitting near the kitchen door on one dinner visit, I've got an idea for chef-owner Angela Brown-Johnson: Find some way to pipe those luscious kitchen aromas out onto the street.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FOOD HANDLING: Next time you order eggs Benedict, give thanks for Mr. and Mrs. LeGrand Benedict, the jaded rich folks who implored the staff at Delmonico's in New York City to concoct something new and different for lunch. John Mariani's "The Dictionary of American Food and Drink" notes the origins and namesakes of many other popular dishes: Caesar Salad: Named for Tijuana restaurateur Caesar Cardini, who first concocted it at his Caesar's Palace on July 4, 1924. Oysters Rockefeller: Named in honor of industrialist John D. Rockefeller because the dish was said to possess a "richness" worthy of the world's wealthiest man. It was created in 1899 at Antoine's Restaurant in New Orleans when a shortage of snails from Europe prompted chef Jules Alciatore to turn instead to local oysters, which were shunned at the time.
FOOD
March 19, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It took two visits, but I think I - finally - see why Philadelphians have been stampeding to Center City's new Elephant & Castle. It isn't the food, which various review partners and I found filling but hardly thrilling. It isn't the decor either. While the vintage signs, bar trays and faux beams are fun, they don't transport me to London, home of the original Elephant & Castle. What might account, in part, for the appeal is the E&C's extensive selection of newly popular beers and spirits and the pub's friendly, if not conspicuously well-trained, young staff.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|