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Cafeterias

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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
The cafeterias at Moorestown's middle and high schools have a new look and an expanded menu this year - all part of a plan to please that finicky teen palate and erase a $30,000 deficit from last year. Dubbed "food courts" after that popular staple of area shopping malls, the revamped cafeterias offer more choices. Each day, students can buy hoagies, made-to-order deli sandwiches, burgers and pizza a la carte besides the more traditional lunch. Also available are french fries, cheese fries, nachos, soup and salad plus freshly baked cookies and ice cream.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Asked to describe the quality of her school cafeteria's food last year, Sophia Santiago wrinkled her nose. She narrowed her eyes. She chose her words carefully. "The pizza tasted like rubber," said Sophia, 11, a sixth-grader at Juniata Park Academy. "I am so serious. " "Kids would just throw their whole lunch away," added fifth-grader Joseph Hamas, 10. Squeezed by increasingly brutal budgets, the Philadelphia School District in recent years has moved to close dozens of full-service cafeterias, switching those schools to meals prepared in a warehouse in Brooklyn and trucked into Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Everyone knows supermarkets and cafeterias are supposed to be sanitary. But some are more sanitary than others. That's the philosophy behind the township's first sanitation awards, handed out Monday night to four establishments where, health officials say, counters are shinier, records are better kept, and refrigerated food is less likely to warm up to dangerous temperatures than in other places. The township decided to give out the awards annually to "shine a positive spotlight" on squeaky-clean stores and food services, said spokesman Stephen Gary.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | By Steve Ritea, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students frustrated by closed cafeterias may have been responsible for two false fire alarms at Harry S Truman High School late yesterday morning, school officials said. The clang of alarms sent 2,300 students filing out of school buildings about 10:15 a.m., said Joseph Boles, principal and acting district superintendent. Minutes after they returned, another alarm forced them back out into the cold, he added. Boles said 39 students who left campus during the alarms were suspended for three days.
NEWS
September 26, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District will end its contract with Aramark to run full-service cafeterias in 115 of the district's 267 schools, officials announced yesterday. As of Oct. 1, the school district will take back the operations and run the cafeterias, which Aramark has run for the last two years. District officials said earlier this month that they were unhappy that the company had not helped the district erase a long-standing deficit in its full-service cafeteria operations and were considering terminating the five-year contract - renewable annually - after the first two full years.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 48-year-old head cook in the cafeteria at Bensalem High School has been accused of stealing receipts from beverage vending machines, police said. Elizabeth "Betty" Hawk, of the 2700 block of East Ann Street, Philadelphia, was arrested yesterday after an investigation by police and school district officials, during which "bait" money was used to catch the suspected thief, police said. A 19-year employee of the Bensalem Township School District, police said, Hawk admitted during questioning that she took money "two [times]
BUSINESS
February 23, 1987 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert and Theresa Giandomenico build hotel rooms, lobbies, restaurants and cafeterias. Then, a few days later, they tear them down. It's all part of the here-today-gone-tomorrow business of taking pictures for clients who want to feature their products or services in advertisements. In the last few weeks, Giandomenico & Fiore Inc. Photography of Collingswood has constructed - and then photographed - working models of school and office cafeterias, grills, salad bars and vending-machine centers for ARA Services Inc. They build replicas of the cafeterias or hotel rooms in their studios in what was once a movie theater.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Tabernacle children's concerns about the environment have prompted the school board to replace disposable plastic knives, forks and spoons with stainless steel utensils in the school cafeterias. The board's decision earlier this month to spend $400 to buy the utensils resulted from a science project in which students studied ways to decrease the amount of trash, board President Neva Moore said. Moore also said the board was acting on another student suggestion and would phase out plastic foam containers in the cafeteria.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to parents' complaints about placing portable classrooms at several West Chester elementary schools, district administrators have changed their recommendations about future school construction. At the school board's monthly meeting Monday, Superintendent William Deighan said he had changed his mind about a recommendation to place 23 portable classrooms at seven elementary school sites over the next three years. Last month, Deighan proposed using the portable classrooms as a temporary solution to overcrowding until a new elementary school could be opened in 1991.
NEWS
November 18, 2004
RECENTLY, NBC-10 News aggressively advertised their investigative reports on school cafeterias. As if it wasn't bad enough that I was forced to watch "Joey" by my wife, I also had to endure a popup on the bottom of the screen every 15 minutes of a rat eating a hamburger and a message saying watch NBC-10 News Special Report. This rat continued to pop up until 11. What finally put me over the edge was during "ER," they showed a bunch of cockroaches swarming another piece of food.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another union has a deal with the Philadelphia School District. The members of Unite Here Local 634, which represents school cafeteria workers and noontime aides, has ratified a four-year contract that contains benefits savings and work-rule changes, including a weakening of seniority rights. The 2,000 workers - the school system's lowest paid - will actually get pay bumps that officials said are made possible by allowing the district to temporarily stop payments to the union's health and welfare fund.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ANOTHER UNION has agreed to a deal with the Philadelphia School District that will save the district money and decrease the role of seniority. No, not that union. Unite Here Local 634, which represents 2,200 cafeteria workers and student-climate staff, signed off on the pact Saturday with a unanimous vote. The School Reform Commission is expected to approve it Thursday. The contract, which runs through September 2017, will provide members with a raise each year, but also includes key work-rules changes the district sought.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FANNIE MAE ASKEW loved to sing the old gospel songs. Songs like "His Eye Is On The Sparrow" and "How Great Thou Art" seemed to take her closer to her spiritual home. Even in her final illness, Fannie was singing the hymns. A daughter of the South, Fannie Mae worked for the Philadelphia School District as a cafeteria helper at Pepper Middle School, and was an active member of Mount Zion Baptist Church for many years. She died Tuesday at age 93. She was living in Newtown Square and had lived previously in Southwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Asked to describe the quality of her school cafeteria's food last year, Sophia Santiago wrinkled her nose. She narrowed her eyes. She chose her words carefully. "The pizza tasted like rubber," said Sophia, 11, a sixth-grader at Juniata Park Academy. "I am so serious. " "Kids would just throw their whole lunch away," added fifth-grader Joseph Hamas, 10. Squeezed by increasingly brutal budgets, the Philadelphia School District in recent years has moved to close dozens of full-service cafeterias, switching those schools to meals prepared in a warehouse in Brooklyn and trucked into Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Kids may not like it, but schools are on the right track with healthier lunch menus that serve up more fruits and vegetables and less junk food. Under nutritional standards that took effect this year, cafeterias must serve twice as many fruits and vegetables while limiting proteins and carbohydrates. High school students are restricted to a maximum of 850 calories. The healthier menu was pushed by first lady Michelle Obama as part of her Let's Move campaign to fight childhood obesity.
NEWS
January 23, 2012
I now interrupt this bad budget news for another story of how kids do great things in Philadelphia schools every day. School cafeteria food is a perpetual joke - unappetizing, unidentifiable mystery meat, meals heavy on carbs and light on fresh ingredients. Three seniors at the Girard Academic Music Program, a Philadelphia School District magnet school in South Philadelphia, want to fix that. Jasmine Oliver is part of a group exploring how they can get more fresh fruits and vegetables in city schools.
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
After the tables were properly set, the ice water was poured, and everyone was seated, the chef greeted guests and described the lunch prepared for them: Beef lasagna with homemade tomato sauce and grated Parmesan cheese; roasted red peppers with rosemary; green salad with creamy herb vinaigrette; and for dessert, lemon granita. The table captains, outfitted in white chef's jackets, were summoned to carry trays of food and serve it family style. Not exactly the setting or menu you might expect for an urban school cafeteria, but such was the scene at Girard College in North Philadelphia last week, where 260 city kids ages 6 to 17 were having lunch at a camp program.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
Every cut the School District has made this spring will have a negative impact on children. Cutting 26 school cafeterias to save $2 million is extremely shortsighted. One in five children in the United States is overweight or obese, and the number is growing. The chief causes are lack of physical activity and unhealthy eating habits. Poverty often plays a significant role in childhood obesity. Preventable diseases - diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol - are just a few of the lifelong consequences.
NEWS
July 9, 2011 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
Vanessa Thomas was already struggling with the loss of her job as a Philadelphia School District cafeteria worker. She was one of 3,000 employees laid off last month. But Thursday, Thomas got the shock of her life when she called her credit union to see if her final paycheck had been deposited. The $750 she was expecting wasn't there. Instead, there was only a deposit of $150, she said. "When it was time for me to withdraw money, it was just a few dollars in there," said Thomas, 43, who lives in West Oak Lane.
NEWS
November 24, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion B. Rowan, 83, of Gloucester City, who helped reorganize the St. Mary School's library in the late 1960s and went on to manage the school's cafeteria for many years, died Friday, Nov. 19, of complications from a leg injury and a preexisting heart condition at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden. As a member of St. Mary School's Parent-Teacher Association in the late 1960s, Mrs. Rowan took a library cataloging course and started volunteering at the school's library. Mrs. Rowan and the PTA president at the time, Regina Pyrah, reorganized the school's library to follow a specific filing system, Pyrah said.
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