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Caffeine

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FOOD
December 17, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. Is caffeine a drug, and if so, can you drink enough coffee in one day for it to kill you? Bill Karpen La Quinada, Calif. A. Caffeine is a drug, classified as a stimulant. It occurs naturally in coffee, tea and cacao beans, and in more than 63 species of plants growing in all parts of the world, either in the leaves, seeds or fruit. According to an article by Denise Grady in Discover magazine, between 5 and 10 grams of caffeine can kill an adult. "To get that much caffein from the usual sources," informs Grady, "you'd have to drink so much, so fast - 75 cups of coffee, 125 cups of tea or 200 cans of cola in a day - that you'd probably become violently ill before you could ingest the lethal dose.
NEWS
July 9, 2007
It's a white powder, it'll keep you wired all night, and it's called Blow. "Our product is not designed to be an illicit-drug alternative," says Logan Gola, the brains behind Blow. Still, it arrived at The Inquirer in a faux dusty box. Inside were vials of Blow, a toy credit card, and a mirror. (But no dollar bill.) The new mix is being peddled to a market that is hooked: Energy-drink sales increased by 50 percent between 2005 and 2006, according to the Beverage Marketing Corp.
FOOD
September 25, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
HILLS BROTHERS PERFECT BALANCE 50 PERCENT CAFFEINE COFFEE. $2.29 per 12- ounce, $3.89 per 24-ounce or $5.99 per 36-ounce can. Also available in 7- ounce jar of instant. Bonnie: Instead of simply offering consumers the choice between decaffeinated coffee and regular, Hills Brothers combined the two to produce Perfect Balance - a coffee with about half the caffeine of regular. A 5-ounce cup of Perfect Balance contains about 53 milligrams caffeine compared to 115 for a cup of regular drip-method coffee and 80 for a cup of regular percolated.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | Consumer Reports
There's no question that caffeine is a drug. Too much of it, and you may experience caffeine intoxication. Miss your daily fix - whether you prefer coffee, tea or soda as the means of delivery - and you could experience withdrawal symptoms. But does it really carry much risk for adults or children? Caffeine stimulates the central nervous system. That can lead, scientists have confirmed, to a variety of changes, many of them positive. Among the benefits: Mood elevation.
FOOD
January 30, 1994 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
With Valentine's Day fast approaching, you might be considering a substitute for chocolate. Those in the health-food world fault this divine substance on two counts: It contains fat and it contains caffeine. Although the hard-core health foodists will probably never give in and take a bite, there is reason for anyone who has been avoiding chocolate because of fat to take heart: It is likely that a defatted chocolate chip will be on the market before the end of the year. One company is already using these chips in its chocolate chip cookies, but the product is only available to manufacturers.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Talk about a caffeine buzz: A new study says honeybees get a shot of caffeine from certain flowers, and it perks up their memory. That spurs them to return to the same type of plant, boosting its prospects for pollination and the future of the plant species. Maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that one of the flowers is the coffee plant. Its nectar offers about as much caffeine concentration as a cup of instant coffee, according to researchers. But some citrus plants serve caffeine too, albeit in lower concentrations.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a record 40,000 competitors set for Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run, many may be looking for an energy boost. They may want to consider some advice from the International Marathon Medical Directors Association: Don't load up on caffeine. The group's recommendation — to consume no more than 200 mg of caffeine the morning of a race of 10K or more — is not widely known, even among endurance athletes. The guidance is aimed at an uncommon but disturbing phenomenon: young, experienced, seemingly healthy runners dropping dead near the finish line for reasons that are never explained.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
J AMES FAYAL, 23, of Rittenhouse Square, is founder of Zest Tea Company. The company has developed four high-quality tea blends that have more caffeine than coffee without the unwanted side effects. In July, Fayal, who's also controller at NextFab Studio, raised nearly $10,000 through a crowdfunding competition. He began selling tea from Zest Tea's website last month. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Zest Tea? A: A friend and I are tea drinkers and discussed ways to make tea more caffeinated without the side effects of coffee.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virtually every international traveler experiences some of the debilitating effects of jet lag after a long overseas flight. When you begin to function in a time zone that is three to 12 hours different from your own, jet lag isn't caused so much by lack of sleep as by upsetting the body's sleep-wake cycle. Jet lag manifests itself in different ways for different people, but it's usually accompanied by disorientation, drowsiness throughout the day and inability to sleep normally.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
BOSTON - U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials plan to investigate whether inhalable caffeine sold in lipstick-sized canisters is safe for consumers and if its manufacturer was right to brand it as a dietary supplement. AeroShot went on the market late last month in Massachusetts and New York, and it's also available in France. Consumers put one end of the canister in their mouths and breathe in, releasing a fine powder that dissolves almost instantly. Each plastic canister contains B vitamins, plus 100 milligrams of caffeine powder, about the equivalent of the caffeine in a large cup of coffee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2015 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
When Tempesta di Mare explores music's past, it reminds listeners that the future has a lot to learn from it. This time, the baroque music ensemble uncovered Parisian favorites Saturday at Friends Meeting in Old City. In that unadorned setting, the five instrumentalists and soprano Rosa Lamoreaux offered elegantly ornamented singing and dances and a glimpse into the serious musical bases for aristocratic entertainment. Is it art or is it entertainment? Paris had no problem with that question.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Using caffeine to treat premature newborns for apnea - dangerous pauses in breathing during sleep - does not have long-term harmful effects on their sleep or breathing patterns, according to research led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. But the new study also found that prematurity itself is a risk factor for sleep disorders years later. Children born preterm had high rates of obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movement during sleep, whether or not they had caffeine therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A SEATTLE-BASED, self-described "news geek" says he's excited by the challenge of swapping the West Coast for Philadelphia and working with journalists at the Daily News , the Inquirer and Philly.com to make the city's most popular news websites better and more profitable. Eric Ulken, 36, was tapped yesterday as the new executive director of digital strategy for Philly.com and the other digital news properties run by Interstate General Media, the parent company of the Daily News and Inquirer . "This is an opportunity to be in a place where you have three world-class newsrooms with a great history doing interesting things, and with a real - from what I can tell - hunger for embracing digital, and embracing change," he said yesterday by phone from Seattle.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
J AMES FAYAL, 23, of Rittenhouse Square, is founder of Zest Tea Company. The company has developed four high-quality tea blends that have more caffeine than coffee without the unwanted side effects. In July, Fayal, who's also controller at NextFab Studio, raised nearly $10,000 through a crowdfunding competition. He began selling tea from Zest Tea's website last month. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Zest Tea? A: A friend and I are tea drinkers and discussed ways to make tea more caffeinated without the side effects of coffee.
FOOD
May 23, 2013
Cold caffeine comfort Watered-down iced coffee has been unnecessary since La Colombe issued Pure Black a couple of years ago. Now Philadelphians have a West Coast option, too, with these fist-sized, Cold Brew "stubbies" from Portland's Stumptown. Made from toddy-style coffee (steeped at room temperature for 16 hours, then strained), this ready-to-drink brew has the pronounced acidity typical of Stumptown's coffee - a brightness that cuts nicely through a splash of milk and sweetness.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Talk about a caffeine buzz: A new study says honeybees get a shot of caffeine from certain flowers, and it perks up their memory. That spurs them to return to the same type of plant, boosting its prospects for pollination and the future of the plant species. Maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that one of the flowers is the coffee plant. Its nectar offers about as much caffeine concentration as a cup of instant coffee, according to researchers. But some citrus plants serve caffeine too, albeit in lower concentrations.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Winter's cruelest months A recent study has found that more fatal heart attacks and strokes occur in winter than at other times of the year After studying about 1.7 million death certificates filed between 2005 and 2008, cardiologists Bryan Schwartz and Robert A. Kloner found a 26 percent to 36 percent greater death rate from heart attacks in winter than in summer. The worst months are December, January, February, and early March. The doctors analyzed the cause of death for people in seven areas, including Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a 3:30 p.m. meeting for his group design project, a class from 6 to 9 p.m., and a mechanical-engineering exam the next day, Kevin Capps was feeling a workload crunch. So the skateboard-toting Drexel University senior stopped by a Wawa store Wednesday morning to pick up some energy in a can: 12 ounces of Red Bull. Was he risking his health? Almost certainly not, say health experts. The amount of caffeine in one 12-ounce can of the popular beverage - 114 milligrams - is about the same as that in a typical cup of coffee.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAGERSTOWN, MD. - The highly caffeinated Monster Energy Drink has been cited in five deaths and one non-fatal heart attack, according to reports that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating. The reports claim that people had adverse reactions after they consumed Monster Energy Drink, which comes in 24-ounce cans and contains 240 milligrams of caffeine, or seven times the amount of the caffeine in a 12-ounce cola. Although the FDA is investigating the allegations, which date back to 2004, the agency said the reports don't necessarily prove that the drinks caused the deaths or injuries.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My husband of three years and I have finally gotten to where it is practical to try to start a family. We've known for a few years that I have a fertility problem that gets progressively worse each month, but we weren't ready so we decided to wait. I have given up everything I am supposed to including alcohol and caffeine, even caffeine-free diet soda at his request, and am taking dance classes twice a week to try to get to a healthier weight. I am active and only 15 pounds overweight.
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