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Caffeine

NEWS
March 23, 2008 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Eating a diet that includes garlic may actually strengthen the bones in your body, whereas caffeine can cause bone disintegration. These conclusions don't come from a scientific or medical journal; they were the determination of an experiment performed by Sung Hyun, an 11th grader from West Deptford High School. Hyun's submission was one of about 300 students from Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties who participated in the Coriell Institute's Science Fair, held March 15 on Camden County College's Blackwood campus.
NEWS
July 9, 2007
It's a white powder, it'll keep you wired all night, and it's called Blow. "Our product is not designed to be an illicit-drug alternative," says Logan Gola, the brains behind Blow. Still, it arrived at The Inquirer in a faux dusty box. Inside were vials of Blow, a toy credit card, and a mirror. (But no dollar bill.) The new mix is being peddled to a market that is hooked: Energy-drink sales increased by 50 percent between 2005 and 2006, according to the Beverage Marketing Corp.
NEWS
February 25, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Owners of MilkBoy, the coffeehouse that has fueled Ardmore's revival with dual shots of caffeine and funky culture, will try a version of their cafe in Bryn Mawr. Paul Lichtman, Jamie Lokoff and Tommy Joyner will open a second MilkBoy Coffee on March 5, in the Bryn Mawr Film Institute building at 824 W. Lancaster Ave. The fledgling cafe will resemble its parent somewhat; both will offer live music most nights and attempt to draw patrons with a '60s-style coffeehouse atmosphere.
NEWS
November 12, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The customer marched up to the counter of the Treehouse and placed her order for a one-shot espresso. She was 8, an elementary schooler waiting with her parents while her sibling practiced an instrument at a nearby shop on Haddon Avenue in Collingswood. "The sister was getting music lessons, and she was getting coffee lessons," said Treehouse owner Randy Van Osten, who waited on the java-loving youth. "Some parents let their kids drink caffeine at a really young age. I have kids that come in that are probably 10 or 11. " Three years ago, when Van Osten bought the cozy coffeeshop in the center of town, he wasn't expecting the younger set to guzzle his coffee, flavored lattes and espressos.
NEWS
October 27, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
It's no surprise that Philly soul-folkie Amos Lee packed the TLA to the rafters Wednesday night with mom-jeans-wearing ladies and their down-vest-toting boyfriends. Lee's brushed-denim funkiness and smoked-almond vocals won him the adoration of local decaf-latt? fans long before his eponymous debut hit pay dirt. His feel-good lyrics - even with their jolts of dark emotionalism - were never too hot or too cold. What was surprising was that Lee seemed too willing to sleepily play those very same grave cards.
FOOD
April 6, 2006 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Naming the coffeehouse was easy, a piece of sour-cream cake. "I wanted the cafe to be the high point of people's day," says owner Meg Hagele. In no time at all, months really, that's precisely what the cozy shop has become. The High Point Cafe is the sort of place a neighborhood never knew it needed until it appears, and then the neighborhood realizes it can't do without. It's Cheers with caffeine. In July, the small shop - eight tables, 19 chairs - opened in West Mount Airy, the northwest Philadelphia neighborhood tightly knit around the 33-year-old Weavers Way Co-op and all matters political, especially issues that list left.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starbucks? Or Three Beans? That is the question. For nearly nine years, two coffee shops have dominated and coexisted in Haddonfield. Each one thrives - booms, in fact. Yet, aside from one obvious similarity - both sell coffee - the shops are completely different. And each has a fiercely loyal clientele. Starbucks, in the center of town, at the corner of Haddon Avenue and Kings Highway, is one of 8,949 Starbucks worldwide, part of a chain that had revenues of $4 billion in 2004.
FOOD
December 2, 2004 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Don Lavin was in town on business not too long ago and was oh so glad he was staying at the Park Hyatt at the Bellevue. For right there, a few floors below, was an oasis. "OK, so maybe I'm a living 21st-century cliche, but I need my Starbucks every workday morning," said Lavin, a pharmaceutical supply salesman from Chicago. "I don't know what it is, but it gets me going and puts on the smile. " Well, we know what "it" is. A recent analysis of the caffeine content in six brands of coffee done for The Inquirer by Central Analytic Laboratories, of Metarie, La., revealed that Starbucks coffee had 322 milligrams in a 16-ounce cup, about 20 percent more oomph than second-place Illy (265 mg)
BUSINESS
October 7, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What price hike? Jennifer Silver didn't even notice yesterday that Starbucks charged her 27 cents more - including tax - for her usual morning jolt, a Triple Vente Soy Caramel Macchiato. "I never pay attention. I always just figure it's $5 with tip," said Silver, a regular at Starbucks on Main Street in the Manayunk section of Philadelphia. The price of her brew jumped from $3.85 to $4.12. A small cup of regular coffee at Starbucks now costs $1.61 with tax in the city.
NEWS
July 29, 2004
Announcements of new medical findings or miracle drugs often leave us fighting bouts of skepticism. Seems something deemed healthy for us one day becomes the bane of our existence the next. Which brings us to caffeine and diabetes. Researchers at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center this week said having caffeine with meals has a negative effect on the blood sugar and insulin levels of Type 2 diabetics. In a country with an estimated 17 million Type 2 diabetics you might think this is big news.
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