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Cairo

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NEWS
May 21, 2006 | By Bruce Blumenthal FOR THE INQUIRER
"You need three things to drive in Cairo," Reham tells us. "Good horn, good brakes, GOOD LUCK. " Reham, our guide to the ancient sites near Cairo (Memphis/Saqqara/Giza), is certainly right about that. And it seems that each of the millions of drivers in Cairo is constantly testing all three elements to see whether they still work. To start, I don't remember seeing more than five traffic lights during our trip through Egypt. More would just be a waste of electricity, since drivers don't feel compelled to stop on red anyway.
NEWS
July 30, 2007 | By ANTONIO JAMES Special to the Daily News
As I stepped off the plane onto the runway, a wave of heat enveloped my body. I saw almost nothing but brown, arid sand. This place was unlike any other place I had ever been to in my life. Imagine the hottest summer day you have ever experienced. Now add 15 degrees to that. However, the sudden difference in temperature was a welcome change from the cabin of the plane. After a thirteen-hour flight this weekend, two hours of which were spent sitting on the runway, anyone would look forward to stepping into the steamy rays of the Egyptian sun. My first instinct, like any other tourist, was to take pictures of anything and everything that I saw. However, the security guard who was escorting us into the crowded terminal had other ideas.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
If no ordinary Egyptian would have anything to do with it - if it has been used up, broken, shredded, spindled, emptied or eaten to the rind - the chances are very good that it will wind up in a dusty shantytown on the eastern outskirts of Cairo. That is where the zabaleen - the "garbage people" - live. Trash is not their livelihood. It is their whole existence. They do not merely collect the stuff. They dump it onto the floors of their dwellings and pick through it, tossing the food scraps to their pigs.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
A week ago, I was in Egypt, soaking up the sun and culture of Cairo. My first visit was back in 1978 when I met and talked with President Anwar Sadat. Changes there inspire awe. My purpose in going to Cairo was to examine the differences between that city (pop. 10 million) and American metropolises. The differences were many and obvious. The people possess an unmistakable pride, whether they are rich or poor, black or white. Self-pride is first, but it extends to community, region and country.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The four youths, laborers from Upper Egypt, wear clothes retrieved from rubbish heaps and sneakers laced with discarded electrical wire. By day, they work in a dusty alley, scraping the rust off scrap metal and cutting the metal into strips to be recycled into pots and pans. By night, they inhabit a drafty mausoleum, resting place of "the lost soul Sheik Mohammed Abdeen," a teacher who died in 1925, and of another Egyptian, whose name is no longer legible on his crumbling tombstone.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
By noon of the first day, the air conditioning was out of order at Mubarak Station in downtown Cairo. There were long lines at the ticket windows, and the arriving trains were almost as crowded as the infamous buses that people had gone underground to escape. The Cairo Metro, which opened to the public Thursday, may not be perfect. But Egyptians are accustomed to traveling in the most uncomfortable conditions imaginable. For them, the new subway - the first in the Middle East and Africa - was much more than adequate, much more than a pleasant surprise.
NEWS
March 22, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An amiable disorder is what you notice first about the Cairo camel market. Great splay-legged beasts lurch through the crowd, frantically pursued by whip-wielding men with turbans. Camels bray in fierce protestation as their handlers try to stuff them into pickup trucks for delivery to their new owners. The next thing you notice is the smell. If you stay long enough, you pick up on something else. You realize that for the men who buy and sell these dun-colored giants - moving mountains whose peaks protrude through crude burlap covers - honor is what matters most.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Arab League foreign ministers agreed in principle yesterday to move the organization's headquarters back to Cairo from Tunis, ending an 11-year arrangement prompted by Egypt's peace treaty with Israel. Egyptian Foreign Minister Esmat Abdel-Meguid announced the unanimous decision yesterday at a biannual Arab League session. Egypt's Middle East News agency reported the announcement in a dispatch from the Tunisian capital. Abdel-Meguid said the move would take place in September.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO - Massive clashes raged yesterday in downtown Cairo, drawing Christians angry over a recent church attack, hard-line Muslims and Egyptian security forces. At least 24 people were killed and more than 200 injured in the worst sectarian violence since the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak in February. The violence lasted late into the night, bringing out a deployment of more than 1,000 security forces and armored vehicles to defend the state television building along the Nile.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
GREG PORTER, the Drexel University sophomore arrested last week during protests in Cairo, returned to Philadelphia this weekend. A family member standing outside Porter's Glenside, Montgomery County, home told a reporter yesterday that Porter would not be available for comment but that the family is grateful that he is home. The 19-year-old La Salle College High School graduate was met Saturday evening by his parents and other family members at Philadelphia International Airport.
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TRAVEL
March 23, 2015 | By Anna Maria DiDio, For The Inquirer
About a year ago, my husband signed on to a team whose mission was to improve the STEM skills (Science Technology, Engineering, and Math) of high school students in Egypt. When the project required visiting a Cairo public school, I agreed to join him when the meetings had concluded. Travel to that part of the world both excited and terrified me. The U.S. Embassy travel-advisory notices were brutally honest and had warned of a "heightened risk of violence" in Cairo due to the anniversary of Egypt's 2011 Revolution, which was the time frame of our trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
FOR A MOVIE based on a book written thousands of years ago, "Noah" is sure stirring up a fair amount of modern-day controversy. Before anyone had even seen Darren Aronofsky 's retelling of the Biblical tale, with a slightly tweaked story ark, certain Christian groups were upset that the movie wasn't literal enough in its rendering of the very old man and the sea. Now, three Arab countries have banned "Noah" on religious grounds because Islam...
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As a wave of protests against government corruption and misrule rolls from country to country, nervous autocrats are using the same formula to crush dissent. From Russia, to Ukraine, to Venezuela, to Egypt, and beyond, there are copycat crackdowns: Arrest opposition leaders on absurd charges, hold show trials, beat - or sometimes shoot - protesters, and silence media that challenge the government's message. Then blame a foreign conspiracy for all that has gone wrong. This formula kept many dictators in power in the 20th century.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In Cairo, new love for the military. Trudy Rubin, A23.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | Associated Press
CAIRO - The panel charged with amending Egypt's constitution in the aftermath of the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi met for the first time Sunday, according to the country's official news agency. Meanwhile, as the military-backed interim leadership pushes its fast-track timetable for a return to a democratic rule to Egypt, thousands of women held a brief protest against Morsi's overthrow at the heavily fortified Defense Ministry in Cairo. Ranks of soldiers formed a military cordon outside the ministry.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb and Tony G. Gabriel, Associated Press
CAIRO - With the military beefing up security, tens of thousands took to the streets Friday in a determined push for the return to power of Egypt's ousted Islamist leader, while Mohammed Morsi's opponents staged rival rallies, raising fears of a fresh round of clashes. The army warned it wouldn't tolerate any violence and sent fighter jets screaming over the capital and helicopters hovering over the marches. Publicizing their protests for days, Morsi's supporters vowed that Friday would be decisive in their campaign to try to reverse the military's removal of the country's first democratically elected president after a year in office, following massive protests against him. Unlike other demonstrations held in the evening after breaking the daylong Ramadan fast, the pro-Morsi rallies took place throughout the day. Organized by the ousted president's Muslim Brotherhood party and dubbed "Breaking the Coup," they included marches in Cairo's streets, outside military installations, and in other cities, including Alexandria and several Nile Delta provinces.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Liz Sly and Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - A top U.S. diplomat was rebuffed Monday by representatives of the group that led the popular uprising against Egypt's first democratically elected president and by the Islamist party that could benefit from the ouster, underscoring the depth of anti-American sentiment among many segments of Egyptian society. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns, the highest-level American official to visit Cairo since Mohammed Morsi was removed as president by the military July 3, held meetings Monday with the army chief and defense minister, Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, and with members of the interim government appointed to run Egypt until elections are held.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
CAIRO - Islamist lawmakers in Egypt's disbanded upper house of parliament demanded Saturday that the army reinstate ousted President Mohammed Morsi, and called on other legislatures around the world not to recognize the country's new military-backed leadership. Morsi's supporters, including his Islamist allies, remain steadfast in their rejection of the military's toppling of the president nearly two weeks ago after millions took to the street to demand his ouster. They have staged a series of mass protests in Cairo to push their demands, and are vowing to stay in the streets until he is returned to office.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Evan Hill
It was around 3:30 a.m. in Cairo on Monday, time for fajr , the first of the day's five Muslim prayers. On a wide boulevard running in front of the heavily guarded gates of the Republican Guard club, a few hundred protesters were entering the fourth day of a sit-in demanding the reinstatement of ousted President Mohamed Morsi. They formed into lines, their backs turned to the soldiers guarding the gate, and began to pray. Less than 2,000 feet away, in a high-rise apartment on the other side of the sprawling club, Salah and his family awoke.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Princess Fawzia, 92, a member of Egypt's last royal family and the first wife of Iran's later-deposed monarch, has died, Iranian opposition groups said. Fawzia died Tuesday in Egypt's Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, the Paris-based opposition groups said, but no cause of death was immediately known. She was the daughter of Egyptian King Fuad I, who ruled until 1936. Her brother and nephew later rose to the throne before the monarchy was toppled in 1953. In 1939, she married Iran's then-crown prince, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who was overthrown in the 1979 revolution.
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