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Cairo

NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - The crowd of Salafis in Tahrir Square, several thousand strong, was angry that a draft of a new Egyptian constitution wasn't based entirely on sharia law. The bearded men, many dressed in long, traditional galabiyas - with wives garbed in black, from their gloves to the veils that revealed only their eyes - were a far cry from the young liberals who filled the square in January 2011. Many of the men were members of al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, a group that killed hundreds of policemen and civilians, and dozens of tourists, in the 1990s.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ahmed Sadum grew angry yesterday as he watched rescue workers dig through the rubble that used to be a high-rise apartment building where a good friend's father lived. "Look at the sand coming out," the bank manager said, pointing to the top of the 40-foot pile as rivulets of red earth poured down like water each time a crane lifted another slab from the 14 floors and 14 ceilings sandwiched into one wretched mass. "This has happened before, even without earthquakes. The building was not constructed well.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the toxic smog has lifted each morning, turbaned doormen rise to resume their futile battle, washing away the dirt that has settled overnight on the sidewalks. Peddlers sprinkle the pavement time after time as the day proceeds, struggling to stem the relentless march of industrial dust against their apples, mangoes and onions. Deep into the night, scruffy attendants keep scrubbing down the parked cars jammed along every curb. Five tons of industrial dust fall daily on each square mile of central Cairo.
NEWS
May 17, 2006 | By Trudy Rubin
The disconnect between President Bush's public push for Mideast democracy and developments in the region was in full view last week in Washington and Cairo. Last Friday, Gamal Mubarak, the son of Egypt's president and thus his presumed heir, was welcomed by President Bush and Vice President Cheney at the White House. The younger Mubarak is supposedly spearheading democratic reforms within his father's political party. But on Thursday, right before Mubarak's White House confab, police in Cairo were beating demonstrators protesting the punishment of two reform-minded Egyptian judges.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | By Clare Aigner Fleishman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Though stooped and shaky, the merchant Solimel tunnels us through a dizzying maze of shops and tents known as the Khan el-Khalili, the Arab world's largest market. He slows only to dip his gnarled fingers into bins of crimson hibiscus or golden saffron, or to offer us rocks of mythic myrrh and scoops of natural black pumice. Each exotic sample comes garnished with lyrical sound bites to rival any Madison Avenue pitch. "Black as night, hot as hell and sweet as love - that's the way we Egyptians like our tea," purrs Solimel, handing us glasses of the scalding brew.
NEWS
January 2, 1996
What a holiday season for federal workers. It was bad enough that hundreds of thousands of them were missing a paycheck - while President Clinton and members of Congress, of course, were being paid in full for plenty of do-nothing days. Insult was added to injury as the well-paid lawmakers started jetting overseas on "fact-finding" missions. At some U.S. embassies, furloughed employees had to come back to work to make arrangements for the visiting VIPs. Yuck. This is not to damn all foreign travel by elected officials.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the live-in bowab of a luxury apartment building with a marble foyer, Hussein Taha was always on hand to greet the residents, open the elevator door, carry their parcels, run their errands, and wash their Mercedeses and BMWs. Now, after 14 years on the job - with only a rare day off - Taha is learning what it is to be dispensable. A uniformed security guard, with a gold braid on his shoulder and a gun on his hip, stands at Taha's place in the lobby. He doesn't do the work Taha did; he stands vigil behind a desk.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Aya Batrawy and Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
CAIRO - At a meeting Monday, the Arab League chief urged exiled Syrian opposition figures to unite as a new Western effort to force President Bashar Assad from power faltered. Meanwhile, an additional 85 soldiers, including a general, fled to Turkey in a growing wave of defections. Turkey's state-run Andolou news agency said the group of defectors also included 14 other officers, ranging from a colonel to seven captains. It is one of the largest groups of Syrian army defectors to cross into Turkey since the uprising against Assad began.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Mohammed Khalil, Associated Press
ALEXANDRIA, Egypt - Clashes erupted Friday in two cities in northern Egypt, and protesters rallied in Cairo in the latest demonstrations against Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, who claims the recent wave of antigovernment unrest is the work of conspirators. In the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, hundreds of unidentified assailants threw stones and fire bombs at protesters rallying against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's most powerful political group. Morsi, who hails from the Brotherhood, was elected after longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak was forced to step down in the 2011 popular uprising.
NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Jim Suhr and Jim Salter, Associated Press
WYATT, Mo. - The dramatic, late-night demolition of a levee sent water pouring onto thousands of acres of Missouri farmland Tuesday, easing the Mississippi River floodwaters threatening the Illinois town of Cairo. But the demolition project did nothing to ease the risk of more trouble downstream, where the mighty river is expected to rise to its highest levels since the 1920s in some parts of Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Authorities were considering using techniques similar to the Missouri project to divert an oncoming rush of water.
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