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NEWS
August 11, 2003
THE RECENT passage of a ban on "partial-birth abortion" in the House relays to women the Bush administration's declaration of war not only in Iraq, but also on the women of this country. President Bush is due to sign this ban into law once the Senate and House bills are reconciled. Bush and his fellow Republicans have made it their mission to retract any and all progress that women have made over centuries. "Partial-birth abortion" is not and never has been a medical term that doctors refer to when using this procedure to save women's lives.
NEWS
December 16, 2008 | By Howard Kunreuther and Michael Useem
With Congress balking at a bailout, General Motors soon could be driven into the dustbin of history. How did an icon of American business reach such a disastrous state? For an answer, it's instructive to consider natural disasters - which, like corporate calamities, have been particularly devastating to the country in recent years. Hurricane Katrina killed 1,300 people and forced 1.5 million from their homes. If GM declares bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands will lose their jobs, and many of them could lose their homes, too. Whether the risk at hand is a natural calamity or a corporate disaster, we see parallel lessons for those most responsible for avoiding the worst.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the specter of Y2K approaches, Burlington County officials say they are prepared to function in the event of a calamity. In a presentation yesterday to the freeholders, officials from the county Emergency Management Services and Buttonwood Hospital said myriad precautions had been taken for months. Joseph C. Saiia, the director of the county's Department of Public Safety, said he did not expect major glitches. "We've touched just about every base, and we think we can provide every emergency service, except if there was a wide-scale telephone failure," Saiia said.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey made it onto an undesirable top-10 list yesterday, ranking high among the states most at risk of economic calamity, according to a national research group. California is in a league of its own, but New Jersey also faces a steep climb out of the recession, according to a new study by the Pew Center on the States. Others in fiscal peril are Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Rhode Island, the study authors warned. The states' "fiscal situations are widely expected to worsen even when the national economy starts to recover," the report said.
NEWS
August 15, 2003
ELIZABETH Henry's screed (letters, "Anti-choice calamity" Aug. 11) talks about the "progress" women have made since 1973, when the Supreme Court discovered a constitutional right for women to kill their unborn babies. She laughingly avers that President Bush declared "war" on America's women simply because he wants to ban the grisly (and aptly named - despite Ms. Henry's vituperative disagreement) "partial-birth" abortion. Women's progress? We can easily measure that "progress" since Roe v. Wade: 35 million or so aborted babies, many of them female.
NEWS
August 31, 2005
The images were stunning: rooftop rescues, submerged casinos, a high-rise hotel bereft of windows, and the Superdome's roof peeled back in places like a banana peel. As the floodwaters along the Gulf Coast begin to recede, aid for the areas devastated by Hurricane Katrina will begin to flow in. Charities will send money donated by Americans whose emotions and morals were stirred by the plight of citizens who suddenly lost loved ones, homes, pets and all trace of modern convenience to Katrina's lash.
NEWS
August 2, 2010
BY EXTENDING unemployment benefits for 2.5 million out-of-work Americans, Congress has demonstrated that they are indeed capable of acting like the big boys and girls we elected them to be. Now how about taking this new-found maturity a step further by passing an extension of Medicaid to the states? Without the $112 billion extension of the Federal Medicaid Assistance Percentage (FMAP) that's set to expire in December, 30 states that built the anticipated funding into their budgets will face financial calamity.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
The first priority must be to do whatever is needed to help the displaced, the distraught and the destitute of the Gulf Coast. Official finger-pointing can't be allowed to foul political relationships that must work well for hurricane relief to work well. That said, ordinary citizens have every cause to press for answers on why hurricane preparation and response were so tardy and inadequate in the case of Katrina. Given the scope of the bungling, and the misery it worsened, these questions are valid and pertinent, not partisan.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By John M. Rosenberg
It was my daily comic relief from an otherwise monotonous strategic update and assessment given to commanding Gen. George Casey each morning in Iraq. As the cavalcade of PowerPoint slides dragged on, highlighting facts and figures on everything from enemy combatants killed to supply trucks coming from Kuwait, the general had few questions. But come the status report on restoration of the power-starved nation's electrical grid, Casey would invariably probe extensively, usually on some arcane metric involving the wattage of this or that generating plant.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Paulina García is on screen for just about every frame of Gloria , Chile's official Academy Awards entry for best foreign-language film. (It didn't make the final cut of five - a shame.) The actress inhabits the title role, bringing this fiftysomething woman alive in ways that are haunting and raw. As a divorced office worker, with a grown son and daughter busy with their own lives, García's Gloria frequents clubs, dancing to disco, drinking and smoking, occasionally meeting a man and spending the night with him. Back in her apartment, she eats and sleeps and shoos out a pesky hairless cat that belongs to a neighbor.
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NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the signal bridge of the USS Frank E. Evans, Steve Kraus was scanning the ocean about 3 a.m. as the destroyer made a long, sweeping starboard turn through the darkness. The watch was uneventful until - seemingly out of nowhere - the Australian aircraft carrier Melbourne came barreling toward the Evans at 22 knots. Kraus hurried into the ship's signal shack and got on the intercom to warn the pilot house below: "We're going to get hit!" Then came a mighty crash, and the screeching and shrieking of metal.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Paulina García is on screen for just about every frame of Gloria , Chile's official Academy Awards entry for best foreign-language film. (It didn't make the final cut of five - a shame.) The actress inhabits the title role, bringing this fiftysomething woman alive in ways that are haunting and raw. As a divorced office worker, with a grown son and daughter busy with their own lives, García's Gloria frequents clubs, dancing to disco, drinking and smoking, occasionally meeting a man and spending the night with him. Back in her apartment, she eats and sleeps and shoos out a pesky hairless cat that belongs to a neighbor.
REAL_ESTATE
August 26, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Katie Hartman and Steve Dunbar knew just what they wanted when they decided to buy a house in Brigantine, the island community near Atlantic City. These year-round Moorestown homeowners were after what Hartman calls "a turnkey operation" - something simple, affordable, low-maintenance, and move-in ready. And back in 2007, they thought they had found it. A simple twin house on the beach block on the south side of the island was small, manageable, and a perfect kick-back place for the family: Hartman, 50, a busy attorney; Dunbar, 60, an attorney who had returned to his media-specialist roots for the Princeton School District, and their then-teenage daughter and son, Molly and Riley.
SPORTS
February 2, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
The Phillies are heading south. That's not the lead to a spring-training preview. That's the fear that's keeping me up at night. The rational half of my brain tells me this unparalleled run of Phillies success can't last forever. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia half of my brain suggests that if a downturn is inevitable, we might as well get it over with as quickly as possible. That way we'll get a jump-start on the next Phillies renaissance. And there's nothing more exciting in baseball than a team on the rise, with the possible exception of Ryan Howard making a throw.
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
Once upon a time, most food was thrown on the grill naked and served unadorned. Unbelievable, I know, but true. Now, of course, "building" or "layering" flavor with marinades, rubs, brines, smoke, sauces, chutneys, and more is where it's at, even for home cooks. But how much is too much? Are there rules that will decrease the number of times this grilling season that you will have to order pizza because of the misapplication of enhancements to expensive cuts of beef? With Memorial Day and grilling season upon us, there's nobody better to answer such pressing questions than two Philadelphia-area food professionals, Andrew Schloss and David Joachim.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Kristen Gelineau and David Stringer, Associated Press
RIKUZENTAKATA, Japan - The elderly couple fled their home on foot as warning sirens blared. But they could not keep up with their neighbors and fell behind as the tsunami rushed in. Nearly a week later, Taeko Kanno, 71, and her husband were still missing. "I think there is no hope," said Katsuo Maiya, Kanno's brother-in-law. "I can't find them. The only thing I can do is wait until the military collects their bodies. " As retrieving bodies increasingly becomes the focus of rescue crews in Japan's northeast, it's clear that last Friday's earthquake and tsunami - believed to have killed 10,000 - took their heaviest toll on the elderly in this fast-aging nation, where nearly one person in four is over 65. Many, unable to flee fast enough, perished.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2010 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
DURING THE past 12 months, comedian and WIP sports gabber Big Daddy Graham has: _ Had a burst water pipe destroy a big chunk of his South Jersey home. _ Undergone major back surgery. _ Suffered a serious staph infection. _ Buried his mother after she died of an Alzheimer-related illness. _ And successfully battled throat cancer, although radiation and chemotherapy left him with "burned-out" taste buds, a condition that continues to limit his diet to canned protein shakes.
NEWS
August 2, 2010
BY EXTENDING unemployment benefits for 2.5 million out-of-work Americans, Congress has demonstrated that they are indeed capable of acting like the big boys and girls we elected them to be. Now how about taking this new-found maturity a step further by passing an extension of Medicaid to the states? Without the $112 billion extension of the Federal Medicaid Assistance Percentage (FMAP) that's set to expire in December, 30 states that built the anticipated funding into their budgets will face financial calamity.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By John M. Rosenberg
It was my daily comic relief from an otherwise monotonous strategic update and assessment given to commanding Gen. George Casey each morning in Iraq. As the cavalcade of PowerPoint slides dragged on, highlighting facts and figures on everything from enemy combatants killed to supply trucks coming from Kuwait, the general had few questions. But come the status report on restoration of the power-starved nation's electrical grid, Casey would invariably probe extensively, usually on some arcane metric involving the wattage of this or that generating plant.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2010 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"I didn't want him to marry the ugly girl; I wanted him to marry the pretty one, and I'm much prettier. " - Continental Airlines Inc. chief executive officer Jeffery Smisek, on United Airlines CEO Glenn Tilton's merger talks with US Airways Group Inc. "I believe Jeff was sincere in his apology, have accepted it on behalf of all of us, and am ready to move past it. " - US Airways CEO Doug Parker, after Smisek said he was sorry for the...
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