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Calcium

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FOOD
March 31, 2011 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
A fear of falling knows no age or season, but this past winter and a recent physical exam reminded me that time and gravity conspire to make arms, legs, and hips snap like dry twigs. Advice about fighting back has been around for many years and ranges from performing balancing exercises and weight-bearing activities to popping pills that boost calcium, a necessary ingredient in maintaining overall skeletal health. Even so, the most recent science-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans notes that "a significant number of Americans have low bone mass, a risk factor for osteoporosis, which places them at risk of bone fractures.
FOOD
June 6, 1990 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
The word today is that American women tend to get only a third of the calcium they need to prevent osteoporosis. Calorie-watchers tend to run up the worst records: in an effort to cut calorie and cholesterol intake, many of us have shortchanged ourselves on dairy foods - often needlessly. It's true that calcium-rich cheeses, whole milk, cream, ice cream and other butterfat-laden foods are high in calories and saturated fat, but the low-fat versions are substantially higher in calcium and lower in calories, making them an all-around better choice.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When it comes to getting enough calcium, those ubiquitous milk-mustache ads are not working. A new report by a government advisory board has found that most Americans do not get enough calcium to promote growth of the healthiest bones in adolescence, and to prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures in old age. The report, released yesterday, proposes increasing the recommended daily allowance of calcium - the guideline that appears on the...
FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury awarded $1.3 million on Tuesday to the estate of a baby boy who died in 2011 after undergoing complex heart surgery at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. By an 11-1 vote, the jury found that Adrian Wilson's death was caused by an excessive amount of calcium administered by anesthesiologist Veronica C. Swanson. Attorneys for the boy's estate had decided to drop the hospital as a defendant in the case, heard in Common Pleas Court, but the sides stipulated that the doctor was acting as the hospital's agent.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: What causes calcium deposits in the lungs? Is there a cure, or can I expect the condition to get progressively worse with time? A: As a defense mechanism, the body deposits calcium at the sites of inflammation. The calcium walls off the inflammation and may prevent contamination of surrounding tissues. Sometimes the calcium deposits cause more trouble than the inflammation itself; for example, calcific deposits in tendons often cause severe pain. Lymph glands can also calcify.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Lisa Scottoline
My life just changed in a good way. In fact, in a great way. By gummi vitamins. Let me explain. I'm supposed to take a multivitamin, B complex, calcium, CoQ10, and Crestor. But the only thing I take is Crestor. Why? because I don't like taking pills, or I forget, and pills suck. That would be a medical term. So imagine my delight when I'm cruising the aisles in the food store, and I see a massive jug of gummi vitamins. I don't mean gummy, like my pie crust.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Working Woman magazine, the Thomas Jefferson University newsletter, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Inquirer wire services
THE SNACK DIET. Snacking to help you lose weight? Yes, says Dr. Steven R. Peikin. Peikin, a Thomas Jefferson University staffer, says eating high- protein snacks 20 minutes before meals creates a feeling of fullness. As a result, Peikin says in his new book, The Feel Full Diet, you eat less of the main courses. Some of the suggested snacks - soup, peanut butter-and-honey balls or peanut butter on a celery stalk. CALGARY FOOD STAMPEDE. . . . And speaking of diets, here's last night's dinner menu at the Olympic Village.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugenia Nealis, 78, broke her hip and wrist more than a dozen years ago while playing badminton. Five years ago, she damaged her knee when she slipped from a stool. Last year, she again hurt her wrist. "I had a lot of broken bones," Nealis recalled recently. She has osteoporosis, a women's disease that is commonly known as "brittle bones. " "I didn't blame it on that," said Nealis, who stands just under 5 feet with rounded shoulders. "I never thought about it. " Nealis discovered her disease only earlier this year, in part because of a new screening program at Lawndale Community Hospital.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Lear's Magazine and Inquirer wire services
FOREVER YOUNG You can stop worrying about getting old. "Forty is now very much what 30 used to be, 50 has become like 40 and 65 is the beginning of the second half of life," says Faith Popcorn, business consultant, trend-spotter and author of The Popcorn Report: Faith Popcorn on the Future of Your Company, Your World, Your Life. "As the population ages," Popcorn writes, "the culture is experiencing an ongoing reinterpretation of what 'older' means - undergoing what I call down-aging.
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NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury awarded $1.3 million on Tuesday to the estate of a baby boy who died in 2011 after undergoing complex heart surgery at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. By an 11-1 vote, the jury found that Adrian Wilson's death was caused by an excessive amount of calcium administered by anesthesiologist Veronica C. Swanson. Attorneys for the boy's estate had decided to drop the hospital as a defendant in the case, heard in Common Pleas Court, but the sides stipulated that the doctor was acting as the hospital's agent.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc Winans had a right to feel uneasy. His maternal grandfather died of a heart attack at 55. His mother's brother made it to 57 before meeting the same fate. Several cousins on his mother's side also had heart disease - including a second cousin who died at 40. Yet Winans did not have especially high cholesterol levels, and at 38, the Jeffersonville resident was a nonsmoker and in good physical shape. Should he take statins as a precaution? The answer, he hoped, lay in a big white doughnut at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Lisa Scottoline
My life just changed in a good way. In fact, in a great way. By gummi vitamins. Let me explain. I'm supposed to take a multivitamin, B complex, calcium, CoQ10, and Crestor. But the only thing I take is Crestor. Why? because I don't like taking pills, or I forget, and pills suck. That would be a medical term. So imagine my delight when I'm cruising the aisles in the food store, and I see a massive jug of gummi vitamins. I don't mean gummy, like my pie crust.
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Wendy Donahue, Chicago Tribune
Milk does a child's body good, but choosing the right type can make a parent's head ache. As reports of childhood obesity rise, we asked registered dietitian Sarah Krieger, a children's hospital consultant in St. Petersburg, Fla., and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, to share guidelines she is giving families. Question: Why is milk important for children? Answer: It contains so many nutrients that children need to grow. Calcium is obvious, but milk is also high in potassium - it has more than bananas - phosphorus, protein, vitamins like B12 and D and magnesium.
NEWS
May 9, 2011
Improving the dental care of elders who have dementia Nursing home residents with dementia often resist staff members who try to take care of their teeth. As a result, many have poor dental hygiene, which is associated with periodontal disease and other health problems. A small pilot study led by an assistant professor of nursing at Pennsylvania State University found it was possible to improve dental care by addressing residents' fears. Due to their cognitive problems, people with dementia may feel frightened or threatened especially easily.
FOOD
March 31, 2011 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
A fear of falling knows no age or season, but this past winter and a recent physical exam reminded me that time and gravity conspire to make arms, legs, and hips snap like dry twigs. Advice about fighting back has been around for many years and ranges from performing balancing exercises and weight-bearing activities to popping pills that boost calcium, a necessary ingredient in maintaining overall skeletal health. Even so, the most recent science-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans notes that "a significant number of Americans have low bone mass, a risk factor for osteoporosis, which places them at risk of bone fractures.
FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
NEWS
July 20, 2002
Research and hormone-replacement therapy Your editorial implies that it is a major failure of modern medicine that new information about hormone-replacement therapy is coming out only now ("Shock treatment," July 13), as if a deep, dark anti-woman cabal of gynecologists is suppressing this info. Modern medicine actually requires evidence, acquired with the painstaking tools of the scientific method and double-blind studies, before coming to a conclusion. We don't have the luxury of only embracing those ideas that fit our preconceived notions.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anxiety about "bone health" has become epidemic over the last decade, especially among women. No wonder, considering all the celebrities with milk mustaches, government calcium-education campaigns, calcium-fortified foods, free bone-density tests, ads for bone-building drugs, and dire warnings about the hobbling and hunchbacking effects of osteoporosis. But while industry and advocacy groups would have you believe America is bad to the bone, the conventional wisdom about how to build strong bones and keep them that way is being challenged - and not just by vegetarians and animal-rights activists, who have long had a bone to pick with the dairy industry.
LIVING
September 27, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clay Armstrong, a professor of physiology at the University of Pennsylvania, yesterday was named one of six winners of the Lasker Award, considered a top honor for American doctors and medical researchers. Armstrong was recognized for his role in discovering the biological equivalent of transistors and switches - a finding that has led to important new drugs for heart failure, blood pressure regulation, and kidney disease. Called "ion channel proteins," these switches channel the electrical signals that animate the human body - generating nerve impulses, contracting muscles, and regulating cardiac rhythm and hormone secretion.
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