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Calcium Supplements

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NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I've heard that calcium can interfere with the absorption of certain prescription medications. Does that include almond milk, yogurt, and cheese, too? Answer: Dairy products and calcium can bind up certain medications in the stomach, reducing their absorption and efficacy. Almond "milk" is not actually a dairy product, however, so it does not have this effect. Medications whose absorption can potentially be reduced by the dairy products or calcium supplements include: Levaquin and Cipro antibiotics; iron supplements; osteoporosis drugs like Fosamax and Actonel; Synthroid (levothyroxine)
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Giving extra calcium to adolescent girls may greatly reduce the possibility that they will develop the crippling bone disease osteoporosis later in life, researchers said today. Pennsylvania State University scientists said they found significant increases in bone mass among girls 12 to 14 years old who were given about 10 percent more calcium than the recommended daily allowance. Half of the 94 girls enrolled in the study increased their calcium intake by taking two tablets daily of a commercial form of calcium called citrate malate - roughly the equivalent of an additional glass of milk.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Lisa Karoly, Special to The Inquirer
A New Year's resolution - one that many of us make but few of us keep - brought Elly Quici, 54, of Rockledge, to the fitness seminar at Jeanes Hospital. "I promised myself I would get in shape. I've said it so many years I have to do it now or never," she said. "This program will motivate a lot of people. I need an extra push. " Quici was among about 25 women who showed up for the "Personal Fitness: Resolution to Reality" seminar, offered as one of a series of workshops for women sponsored by Jeanes Hospital, 7600 Central Ave. The personal fitness series is designed to give women a complete understanding of fitness and a plan for getting fit, according to Suzanne Havrilla, assistant director of rehabilitation services at Jeanes and co-ordinator of the series.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
HOME ON THE RANGE How many times have you said your house is like a zoo? Well, the relationships of antelope siblings in the wild may illuminate the behavior of human children in the suburbs, says a University of Idaho researcher. Firstborn children are more likely to be famous and to score better on national achievement tests. Pronghorn antelope fawns don't take exams, but the early born among them tend to become dominant adults. A BONE TO PICK Women smokers, if you take regular calcium supplements and exercise to ward off osteoporosis in later life, you may be making all that effort for nothing.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
FITNESS FACT OR FICTION. According to pollster Louis Harris, 75 percent of us say we exercise regularly, 33 percent say we work out strenuously at least three times a week, 56 percent swear we monitor our fat intake, 57 percent report we've cut down on salt and 46 percent say we steer clear of high- cholesterol foods. Then how come 59 percent of U.S. adults are overweight? Says Joe Schwartz, American Demographics magazine editor: "I think a lot of people . . . answer what they think they should answer instead of what they really do. " AIDS POLL.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Study finds little effect from fasting before cholesterol tests Doctors will tell you: For accurate results, fast for at least eight hours before a lipid profile, the blood test for cholesterol, lipoproteins, and triglycerides. But a study last week in Archives of Internal Medicine says fasting is probably unnecessary. Two Canadian scientists studied records of more than 200,000 people who completed at least one lipid profile during a six-month period. Average levels for total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol varied less than 2 percent overall for the fasting times, ranging from one to 16 hours.
FOOD
September 10, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I know I should get more calcium in my diet, but I don't like to drink milk. Are there other good sources of calcium? - Martha Dear Martha: Dairy products are some of the best sources of calcium. Even if you don't like to drink milk just like that, perhaps you'll enjoy using it in cooking and baking. That will add calcium to your diet. Don't forget other dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt; choose low-fat products (low-fat cottage cheese, low-fat yogurt) to get the most calcium at the lowest cost in calories and fat. Other foods have calcium.
FOOD
June 14, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
Calcium supplements can help young women build tougher bones, but extra doses of calcium have few benefits for women who already have reached menopause, a leading osteoporosis researcher has said. "For most women, 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day - the generally recommended amount - certainly doesn't do much harm and may do some good. But how much it really helps after menopause still is being debated and researched," Gregory Mundy, chief of endocrinology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, said last week.
FOOD
April 8, 1987 | By PHYLLIS FARKAS LIEBERT, Special to the Daily News
More than a hundred nutrition educators gathered on a recent crisp morning to learn more about calcium and how it helps keep us healthy: How much do we really need? Are supplements the answer? Can a calcium-rich diet prevent any diseases? The experts concluded there are no easy answers. Everyone who watches TV or reads popular magazines knows that calcium is a necessity for "strong teeth and bones. " And if you want them to stay strong, calcium must be a lifetime part of your diet.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Study finds little effect from fasting before cholesterol tests Doctors will tell you: For accurate results, fast for at least eight hours before a lipid profile, the blood test for cholesterol, lipoproteins, and triglycerides. But a study last week in Archives of Internal Medicine says fasting is probably unnecessary. Two Canadian scientists studied records of more than 200,000 people who completed at least one lipid profile during a six-month period. Average levels for total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol varied less than 2 percent overall for the fasting times, ranging from one to 16 hours.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I've heard that calcium can interfere with the absorption of certain prescription medications. Does that include almond milk, yogurt, and cheese, too? Answer: Dairy products and calcium can bind up certain medications in the stomach, reducing their absorption and efficacy. Almond "milk" is not actually a dairy product, however, so it does not have this effect. Medications whose absorption can potentially be reduced by the dairy products or calcium supplements include: Levaquin and Cipro antibiotics; iron supplements; osteoporosis drugs like Fosamax and Actonel; Synthroid (levothyroxine)
SPORTS
May 10, 2011 | By Joe Berkery
AS LONG as he's hitting like this, the mustache is staying. "I just shaved, but not the mustache," Clearwater outfielder Brian Gump said. "Even if I wanted to take it off, I don't think my teammates would let me. " That's because ballplayers are a superstitious lot, and Gump has been as hot as the Florida sun since he started to grow the mustache a few weeks ago. His Threshers teammates are calling it "The Mash 'Stache. " He's 16-for-37 in his last 10 games, with a couple homers and 10 RBI. He's up to .319 for the season and brimming with confidence.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Giving extra calcium to adolescent girls may greatly reduce the possibility that they will develop the crippling bone disease osteoporosis later in life, researchers said today. Pennsylvania State University scientists said they found significant increases in bone mass among girls 12 to 14 years old who were given about 10 percent more calcium than the recommended daily allowance. Half of the 94 girls enrolled in the study increased their calcium intake by taking two tablets daily of a commercial form of calcium called citrate malate - roughly the equivalent of an additional glass of milk.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
HOME ON THE RANGE How many times have you said your house is like a zoo? Well, the relationships of antelope siblings in the wild may illuminate the behavior of human children in the suburbs, says a University of Idaho researcher. Firstborn children are more likely to be famous and to score better on national achievement tests. Pronghorn antelope fawns don't take exams, but the early born among them tend to become dominant adults. A BONE TO PICK Women smokers, if you take regular calcium supplements and exercise to ward off osteoporosis in later life, you may be making all that effort for nothing.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Lisa Karoly, Special to The Inquirer
A New Year's resolution - one that many of us make but few of us keep - brought Elly Quici, 54, of Rockledge, to the fitness seminar at Jeanes Hospital. "I promised myself I would get in shape. I've said it so many years I have to do it now or never," she said. "This program will motivate a lot of people. I need an extra push. " Quici was among about 25 women who showed up for the "Personal Fitness: Resolution to Reality" seminar, offered as one of a series of workshops for women sponsored by Jeanes Hospital, 7600 Central Ave. The personal fitness series is designed to give women a complete understanding of fitness and a plan for getting fit, according to Suzanne Havrilla, assistant director of rehabilitation services at Jeanes and co-ordinator of the series.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
TOY-TRAIN RECALL. The Talking Silver Rail Express toy train is being recalled because of a potential fire hazard. Involved are about 38,000 trains, model 1170 made in Hong Kong in 1986, with metal plug connectors between the tender car and the locomotive. Newer train sets with that model number, but having a plastic plug connector between the two cars, are not involved. For a free replacement, call or write New Bright Industries at 800-325-5630 or 41911 Ford Road, Canton, Mich., 48187.
FOOD
June 14, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
Calcium supplements can help young women build tougher bones, but extra doses of calcium have few benefits for women who already have reached menopause, a leading osteoporosis researcher has said. "For most women, 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day - the generally recommended amount - certainly doesn't do much harm and may do some good. But how much it really helps after menopause still is being debated and researched," Gregory Mundy, chief of endocrinology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, said last week.
FOOD
April 8, 1987 | By PHYLLIS FARKAS LIEBERT, Special to the Daily News
More than a hundred nutrition educators gathered on a recent crisp morning to learn more about calcium and how it helps keep us healthy: How much do we really need? Are supplements the answer? Can a calcium-rich diet prevent any diseases? The experts concluded there are no easy answers. Everyone who watches TV or reads popular magazines knows that calcium is a necessity for "strong teeth and bones. " And if you want them to stay strong, calcium must be a lifetime part of your diet.
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