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Calculus

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NEWS
June 21, 1991 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
West Chester school officials said yesterday that they were no closer to ending the stalemate created Wednesday when teacher Remo Ciccone announced that he would withhold students' final grades until administrators granted his demands in an escalating job dispute. Ciccone, a controversial teacher at Henderson Senior High School, wants to continue teaching the honors calculus class he has led with great fanfare since 1989. Principal Eliot Larson, acting on his belief that Ciccone's teaching methods are Draconian, reassigned him to a regular calculus class beginning next year.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | By Richard A. Oppel Jr., Special to The Inquirer
The West Chester Area School District yesterday sought a court order to force Remo Ciccone, the controversial high school calculus teacher, to turn in final grades for his students. Ciccone, 39, has refused to release the grades for 85 Henderson High School students to protest his reassignment at the school. Meanwhile, Ciccone said yesterday that he had received a letter from district officials on Monday indicating "they were going to begin proceedings to ask to dismiss me. " A hearing has not been scheduled on the district's request for a court order.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | By Robert C. Cowen
Economic prophets have exhorted Americans to face up to the "budget deficit" and the "trade deficit. " Now the National Academy of Science urges them to confront the "calculus deficit. " Declining national skill in this crucial type of math weakens U.S. ability to compete economically, warns the academy's Board on Mathematical Science and its Mathematical Science Education Board. They have a point. Calculus permeates the work of scientists and engineers, of financial analysts and bankers, of military strategists and disarmament planners.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you remember that the secant function has vertical asymptotes? Neither did I, but it came right back to me when I listened to the soothing tones of Robert Ghrist. He is a mathematics professor at the University of Pennsylvania, but since January, his audience has grown exponentially: 48,000 people in more than 62 countries. Ghrist is spreading the gospel of calculus through an online education service called Coursera, and he scored a big vote of confidence last week when a higher-education umbrella group said the course deserved official college credit.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's Advanced Placement exam season, and high school students are fretting over the three-hour tests that will determine whether they will earn college credits for their rigorous courses. But seniors in the A.P. calculus class at Archbishop Ryan High School in the Far Northeast aren't sweating. They know that their teacher, Sister Alice Hess, has compiled impressive numbers. Since Sister Alice introduced A.P. calculus to the school a decade ago, nearly 100 percent of her students have scored at least 3 out of 5 points on the exam and earned college credits.
LIVING
October 21, 1996 | Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most of the world hasn't noticed, but if you're one of those folks who is titillated by trapezoids, prefers Pythagoras to Poe, and tries to work the word rhombus into casual conversations, you should know 1996 is a year to celebrate. A trio of mathematical milestones are being marked, and though none of them will help you balance your checkbook, those in the field acknowledge their importance. Three hundred years ago, in 1696, the first book of calculus was published. In 1796 a German teenager showed it was possible to construct a regular heptadecagon (a 17-sided polygon)
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
For their 2016 convention, Democrats picked a city where they have a voter-registration edge of better than 6-1, the political fulcrum of a state that has reliably backed the party's presidential nominees for a generation. Sure, Philadelphia resonates with the symbolism of the nation's founding, but as a purely strategic play, wouldn't it have made more sense to convene in Columbus, in the true swing state of Ohio? Perhaps, some analysts suggested, the third finalist, Brooklyn, N.Y., was rejected because of tension between New York City police officers and liberal Mayor Bill de Blasio - or because the borough's hipsters with their artisanal cheeses wouldn't exactly scream "middle America" on TV. "It's primarily a business decision for us," Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said Thursday.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Math teacher Remo Ciccone has notified his former employers at Kingsway Regional High School that he plans to sue the district for $10 million in damages for wrongful dismissal. "I will win," Ciccone said. Raymond J. Rapposelli, Ciccone's attorney, mailed a notice of the intention to sue - required under the New Jersey Tort Claims Act when a state agency or corporate municipality is sued - to the high school on Aug. 18. Kingsway was the second district, in two years and across two states, to dismiss Ciccone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The arrival of a new gang on the block is - unhappily - nothing new in East Los Angeles. But the colors and jackets of the one that began hanging out in the graffiti-daubed halls of Garfield High School six years ago puzzled rivals and experts. "They have three different jackets, and it's the biggest deal in the school," explained Edward James Olmos. "There's a white one that says 'A.P. Calculus' for your first year, a red one for your second and a blue for the third year. I don't have to tell you having one of those jackets is the biggest deal in the school.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Even though he knew the votes were against him, math teacher Remo Ciccone said he had to try to fight to save his job at Henderson High School in West Chester. Though he has been fired from his position, he vowed in an interview Tuesday to appeal his case to the state Department of Education if his union, the Pennsylvania State Education Association, decides his grievances deserve to be heard. "It was a kangaroo court," Ciccone, 39, said of the two-month set of hearings, which began Oct. 7 before the school board.
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NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
For their 2016 convention, Democrats picked a city where they have a voter-registration edge of better than 6-1, the political fulcrum of a state that has reliably backed the party's presidential nominees for a generation. Sure, Philadelphia resonates with the symbolism of the nation's founding, but as a purely strategic play, wouldn't it have made more sense to convene in Columbus, in the true swing state of Ohio? Perhaps, some analysts suggested, the third finalist, Brooklyn, N.Y., was rejected because of tension between New York City police officers and liberal Mayor Bill de Blasio - or because the borough's hipsters with their artisanal cheeses wouldn't exactly scream "middle America" on TV. "It's primarily a business decision for us," Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said Thursday.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you remember that the secant function has vertical asymptotes? Neither did I, but it came right back to me when I listened to the soothing tones of Robert Ghrist. He is a mathematics professor at the University of Pennsylvania, but since January, his audience has grown exponentially: 48,000 people in more than 62 countries. Ghrist is spreading the gospel of calculus through an online education service called Coursera, and he scored a big vote of confidence last week when a higher-education umbrella group said the course deserved official college credit.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
It costs well over $50,000 a year to attend the University of Pennsylvania, but beginning in June, anyone anywhere will be able to get a sliver of that Ivy League education for free. Penn has joined a group of top universities, including Princeton, that will begin offering select courses online for free through Coursera, a California-based online education company founded this year by two Stanford University computer-science professors. The goal is to make top-notch education available worldwide, including in developing countries, and to a much larger group of people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012
Theater 11th Annual Solo Flights Festival Features five solo artists & two ensemble companies. Closes 3/25. Mill Hill Playhouse, 205 E. Front St., Trenton; 609-392-0766. $20. 1812 Productions: Let's Pretend We're Famous New comedy cabaret featuring Jennifer Childs & Tony Braithwaite. Closes 3/25. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey Pl.; Reservations required: 215-735-0630 or 1-800-595-4849. 1812productions.org. $28-$36. A Little Night Music Stephen Sondheim's Tony Award-winning musical classic.
SPORTS
July 14, 2010
The NCAA changed the format for its annual hoops tourney, expanding the field from 64 to 68. There will now be four play-in games. Two games will feature teams playing to get a 16 seed and later accept a beating from a No. 1. The other two games will feature the last four at-large teams. Having 65 teams just wasn't working. No one was watching the tournament. It was a colossal failure. Low ratings, little drama, no interest. So thank goodness they made this move. It'll save the whole event.
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By Charles Krauthammer
Earlier this month, I wrote a column outlining two exceptions to the no-torture rule: the ticking-time-bomb scenario and its less extreme variant, in which a high-value terrorist refuses to divulge crucial information that could save innocent lives. The column elicited protest and opposition that were, shall we say, spirited. And occasionally stupid. Dan Froomkin, writing for washingtonpost.com and echoing a common meme among my critics, asserted that "the ticking-time-bomb scenario only exists in two places: on TV and in the dark fantasies of power-crazed and morally deficient authoritarians.
NEWS
February 17, 2008
Some moderate Michael Smerconish advises that John McCain's "moderation on social issues" may enable him to appeal to suburban voters ("A Republican who can win in Pa.," Feb. 10). This view of McCain is a misperception. Check out Ontheissues.org, which notes that McCain supports the repeal of Roe v. Wade and voted against spending $100 million to reduce teen pregnancy by education and contraceptives, but favored $75 million on abstinence education. His NARAL rating? Zero percent.
NEWS
February 4, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell yesterday reiterated his support for the war in Iraq after seeming to suggest in an earlier interview that the failure to find weapons of mass destruction had shaken his opinion. Administration officials moved quickly to try to limit any political damage from Powell's acknowledgment in an interview with the Washington Post published yesterday that the failure to find unconventional weapons undermined a key element of the case for war. In the interview, Powell said he was not sure whether he would have recommended an invasion if he had known that Iraq did not have weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's Advanced Placement exam season, and high school students are fretting over the three-hour tests that will determine whether they will earn college credits for their rigorous courses. But seniors in the A.P. calculus class at Archbishop Ryan High School in the Far Northeast aren't sweating. They know that their teacher, Sister Alice Hess, has compiled impressive numbers. Since Sister Alice introduced A.P. calculus to the school a decade ago, nearly 100 percent of her students have scored at least 3 out of 5 points on the exam and earned college credits.
SPORTS
May 11, 2001 | by Ted Silary Daily News Sports Writer
So, how much time is Mike Manzi spending each night preparing for exams in advanced placement classes at LaSalle High? "Is my mom [Peggy] going to read this?" he said, laughing. "Really? About an hour. If you don't know the work by now, you're not going to learn it in one night by some kind of miracle. Anyway, our teachers have done a good job of preparing us. " Manzi, a 6-3, 175-pound senior, plays third base and bats cleanup for the Explorers. Some games go better than others.
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