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NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Indian government has reversed itself and tentatively agreed to allow a British crew to film a controversial movie adaptation of the best-selling novel The City of Joy in Calcutta. Before getting approval, however, the production company was required to hire Sunil Gangopadhyaya, a well-known Indian writer, to serve as script consultant. According to P. Upendra, Indian minister for information and broadcasting, the script will be revised with Gangopadhyaya's help so that "no portion would offend the sentiments of the people of Calcutta.
FOOD
October 4, 2012
The world's cuisine is shaped by immigrants - migrations large and small. Jose Garces showcases the influence of Chinese settlers on Peruvian fare at his Chifa. Munish Narula has added an Indo-Chinese menu to the original location of Tiffin. Chinese immigrants in cities such as Calcutta and Mumbai adapted Indian cooking styles and ingredients such as cumin, coriander seeds, and turmeric. Most of the menu is a spice lover's dream - the green chiles in the manchow soup, the red chiles in the kung pao dishes.
NEWS
October 9, 1989 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was an hour before dawn, but red-eyed Bhanu Lal refused to sleep. Next to him - stretched out on tattered pieces of cloth and covered by rags - his wife, his mother and his five children slept as soundly as one can on the squalid sidewalks of Calcutta. Bhanu Lal said he, too, needed sleep. All day long he had worked as a porter, running around town with huge mounds of bananas and heavy bales of jute perched atop his head. But there was no resting now for him, and many more of the estimated one million ragtag people who spend each night on the sidewalks of central Calcutta.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oh! Calcutta! has achieved notoriety as the show in which the actors take off their clothes, but one of the main problems with the musical comedy, which opened last night at the Theater of Living Arts, is that the performers don't shed their clothing often enough. When the cast is nude, as they are in the opening and final numbers, the show at least has some novelty. It is not every day that a theatergoer can see nude bodies dancing and bouncing about a stage. It's not culture, it's not beauty, but it is, at least, different.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post, the New York Times and USA Today
A movie starring Patrick Swayze and currently shooting in Calcutta is having major problems getting completed. Two weeks ago, citizens disrupted the set, protesting that the film, City of Joy, exploited Calcutta's slum life while ignoring its culture and vitality. A court order also has restricted shooting to one outdoor location. The latest wrinkle came this week, when a court directed that no more filming be done until native writers and film producers check the script to see if it projects a fair portrait of the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Outcasts from birth, the children of prostitutes in Calcutta's red light zone are trapped. The girls, invariably, go into the same line of work as their mothers and grandmothers before them; the boys, with little or no schooling, become idle hangers-on, errand runners, petty thieves. Born Into Brothels, nominated for a documentary Oscar in this Sunday's Academy Awards, offers a rare look into the cloistered precincts of Indian whoredom. But it also offers more than a glimmer of hope for a few of its youngest inhabitants.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Below the streets of this pitiless, once-great city - away from the broiling sun, the legless beggars and the buses belching black smoke - a new Calcutta is trying hard to be born. It is still a tentative thing, this subterranean transformation of the city that, in its poverty and chaos, has come to symbolize urban failure and decay. But it is something real, something clean and orderly that is growing beneath the streets, and it belongs to Calcutta alone. This harbinger of better times is a subway, the only subway operating in India today.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As eager as they were to prove themselves capable of producing a world-class state funeral, officials here were also a little panic-stricken by the logistics involved in hosting dozens of foreign dignitaries. Chief among their worries was transportation. As in roads - Calcutta's are narrow, rutted and filled with maniacal drivers. As in cars - specifically, air-conditioned cars. There aren't that many in the city, and the heat and humidity here are hellacious. As in jets - if all the foreign dignitaries wanted to fly in on their own, there wouldn't be enough space to park them at Dum Dum International Airport.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Ellen O'Brien contributed to this article
By the time she died Friday, Mother Teresa had become one of history's truest saints, a living symbol of Christlike devotion to the poor, the sick and the hungry. A small woman who stood less than five feet tall, she helped awaken the world's conscience to the depths of human poverty and loneliness through her decades of labor in the slums of Calcutta. For this, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979. At the Blessed Katharine Drexel Guild in Bensalem there was scoffing Friday at the very suggestion that Mother Teresa would someday be declared a saint.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mother Teresa's life was pure and simple. But weather, the neglected infrastructure of this city, and the complications of protocol surrounding dignitaries and diplomats are creating a logistical nightmare for those organizing her funeral. To complicate matters, several jurisdictions have a hand in the funeral arrangements. The military is ostensibly in charge, because the Indian government decided that Mother Teresa should be honored with a full state funeral. But her order, the Missionaries of Charity, decided she should be buried in its Mother House, rather than a cemetery.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
One day in 2003, Mike "Slo-Mo" Brenner walked into a music store in Cambridge, Mass., and happened upon a VHS tape offering to teach him "How to Play Hindustani Slide Guitar. " "It had a picture of an Indian gentleman playing this way-out-looking thing," says the Philadelphia guitarist and bandleader, who was then on tour with the roots-rock band Marah. "I asked the guys in the store, 'What is this?' They had no idea. " When he got home and popped it in his VCR, Brenner recalled over lunch at a University City Indian restaurant this week, he heard "the most amazing sound.
FOOD
October 4, 2012
The world's cuisine is shaped by immigrants - migrations large and small. Jose Garces showcases the influence of Chinese settlers on Peruvian fare at his Chifa. Munish Narula has added an Indo-Chinese menu to the original location of Tiffin. Chinese immigrants in cities such as Calcutta and Mumbai adapted Indian cooking styles and ingredients such as cumin, coriander seeds, and turmeric. Most of the menu is a spice lover's dream - the green chiles in the manchow soup, the red chiles in the kung pao dishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2012
LOOKING FOR another worthy role model, Philly musicians? Mike Brenner has reinvented himself . . . yet again. A rootsy, experimental instrumentalist/singer/composer, Brenner first grabbed our attention with the Americana acoustic folk and alt-country of the Low Road and John Train. More recently, Brenner opened eyes and ears with his dobro blues/hip-hop fusion as Slo-Mo featuring rapper Mic Wrecka, from whence sprang the hit "My Buzz Comes Back. " Now he's crossed overinto yet another dimension, the entrancing world of dreamy Indian ragas, playing a 22-string Indian lap guitar called the chaturangui as frontman for the Kolkata Slide Guitar Project.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Veerasamy S. Naiken, 83, a pathologist at the Southern Division of Albert Einstein Medical Center at Fifth and Reed Streets from 1957 until he retired in 1987, died Friday, June 24, at the St. Ignatius Nursing Home in West Philadelphia of complications from a stroke. On Feb. 14, St. Ignatius was holding a naming dedication for its Dr. V.S. Naiken Dining Room. When he failed to appear, he was found in his apartment at the nursing home, having suffered the stroke. In biographical notes, Dr. Naiken stated that he was born on the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius and that after graduating from the Cambridge School, a kindergarten-through-12th-grade school in Calcutta, India, he won a scholarship to the University of Leeds School of Medicine in England and qualified as a physician in 1955.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | CAROL TWARNICKY
IN 1976, I covered a press conference at the Eucharistic Congress in Philadelphia that featured Mother Teresa. Just a few reporters were there, asking respectful questions, except for one gadfly. He challenged the diminutive nun on why she didn't speak out against the Indian government's huge expenditures on a nuclear bomb when its people were starving. She smiled and said she didn't get involved in "politics. " Then the reporter asked her to comment about an Indian government proposal on birth control.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Mira Nair's The Namesake is a celebration of real family values - of the love between father and son, between husband and wife, mother and daughter. It's about cultural heritage and personal legacy, about the things that change across generations, and the things that stay the same. It's a tearjerker, sometimes, and sweetly funny at other moments. It's near perfect. Adapted from the novel by Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake begins in Calcutta in the 1970s, when Ashoke (Irrfan Khan), a young Bengali intellectual who a few years earlier survived a devastating train accident, enters into an arranged marriage with Ashima (the Bollywood star Tabu)
NEWS
April 5, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The end has come. For real. The world is ending, and not with a bang, or a whimper, but a film: Indian director T. Rajeevnath wants to cast celebutante Paris Hilton in a biopic about Mother Teresa. I'm not being some grubby pulpit moralist guy outraged that the star of a home sex tape might portray the nun who worked among Calcutta's poor, though that's ghastly enough. I'm talking dialectics: Philosopher dudes through the ages have said the cosmic journey will end once all dualities are resolved.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Outcasts from birth, the children of prostitutes in Calcutta's red light zone are trapped. The girls, invariably, go into the same line of work as their mothers and grandmothers before them; the boys, with little or no schooling, become idle hangers-on, errand runners, petty thieves. Born Into Brothels, nominated for a documentary Oscar in this Sunday's Academy Awards, offers a rare look into the cloistered precincts of Indian whoredom. But it also offers more than a glimmer of hope for a few of its youngest inhabitants.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ARNOLD Schwarzenegger or . . . "Arnold Jackson"? You remember "Arnold Jackson," he was the character played by Gary Coleman on the '70s sitcom "Diff'rent Strokes. " Well, now Arnold, uh, Gary, wants to be governor of California. According to msnbc.com, the 4-foot-8 actor has paid the $3,500 entrance fee (courtesy of the East Bay Express alternative newspaper) and submitted his 65 needed signatures. "Under the rules of the recall election," wrote the Express, "any jerk can run for governor.
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