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April 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The Tempest, Shakespeare's last play, is stuffed with juicy roles and theatrical opportunities: a magical island full of mysterious creatures, an exiled duke turned wizard, a shipwreck, a love story, and an enslaved sprite who casts spells on buffoons and drunks and fops and wicked aristocrats. It's a strange, gorgeous world. So it's an odd Tempest that takes place on a bare stage. Even odder, this latest production from Philadelphia Shakespeare Festival stars the monster Caliban.
TRAVEL
August 8, 2016 | By Patricia Nickell, LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER
HAMILTON, Bermuda - This small island, only 21 square miles in size and 650 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., gave the world Bermuda shorts (still used as part of the island uniform), Bermuda onions (still used in island cuisine), and Bermuda grass (still used on the island's ubiquitous golf courses). Bermuda has earned literary cred, as well. An early chronicler of its infamous Triangle, William Shakespeare, used it as the shipwreck setting of The Tempest, making it the only New World location the Bard ever cited by name.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong acting and bold direction too often overshadow the work that a design team contributes to a play's success. In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's staging of The Tempest, the designers provide all the elements that make this production memorable. Not that the actors and director Jim Helsinger don't uphold the Festival's high standards. Greg Wood delivers a compelling, sympathetic performance as Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan exiled for 15 years on a remote island with his daughter Miranda (the earnest and endearing Kelsey Formost)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It figures that Julie Taymor, theater magician of The Lion King , film conjurer of Across the Universe , Shakespeare interpreter who made her movie debut with Titus , would be drawn to The Tempest , the one about the sorcerer who unsettles the seas before settling scores. Boldly Taymor changes Prospero's gender, casting the magnificent Helen Mirren as Prospera, cast away with her daughter, Miranda, on a remote island where the sorceress rescues the sprite Ariel and enslaves the creature Caliban.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
No thunder and lightning, no alarums and hullabaloo attend the conjured shipwreck at the start of Shakespeare's valedictory masterpiece, The Tempest, in the revelatory Arden Theatre Company production that opened Tuesday for a month-long run. No shipwreck, in fact, is set before us - just a toy schooner, bobbing high above Hiroshi Iwasaki's draped and platformed set, that crosses from right to left until it is gently, silently plucked from its...
NEWS
May 22, 2007 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
There are few theatrical experiences more transformative than a first encounter with Shakespeare. His portrayal of the human soul in every guise, 400 years on, remains vital and magical. He has birthed generations of theater lovers, and despite the many distractions invented for potential audiences in the years since the Globe Theater's first opening night, he still manages to fill houses across the actual globe. Of course, transformations can go the other way too, and there may be no more scarring dramatic experience than sitting through a long night of bad Shakespeare.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pastorius Park in Chestnut Hill is a lovely setting for the productions of the company known as Shakespeare in the Park. The sloping terrain around the park's languid waterway, contained and crossed by picturesque stone walls and bridges, provides both a natural amphitheater and a delightful place to spend a couple of hours on a summer evening. On one hand, the relaxing, sylvan ambience of the park enhances the gentle, romantic, humorous aspects of The Tempest, the company's current Shakespeare presentation.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Jim Rutter, FOR THE INQUIRER
Theater companies cut Shakespeare to reflect casting, to indulge shortened attention spans, or to center the play on a director's artistic vision or insight, among other reasons. Curio Theatre's current production of The Tempest proves that a bit of risk lies in any of these approaches. And, like any gamble, it also hints at large, if quick, rewards. The Tempest's traditional three-hour run time presents one of Shakespeare's most straightforward plots. Courtly treachery dethroned Duke Prospero (Brian McCann)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Actors From the London Stage - the group presenting The Tempest at the Annenberg Center - believe, according to a program note, in the "power of Shakespeare's words in performance, and in the rich possibilities created by the imaginations of a participating audience. " To that end, the troupe, which has been visiting here regularly for several years, presents Shakespeare with no sets, no costumes, rudimentary stage lighting, a prop here and there, and five actors doubling and tripling in roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The opening scene of Louis Rackoff's new production of The Tempest, on view through April 12 at the People's Light & Theatre Company, makes you eager to see what follows. On a platform at stage right, the magician Prospero is writing the story you're about to witness, complete with stage directions and introductory dialogue: Master: Boatswain, - Boatswain: Here, master; what cheer? And immediately we hear those words shouted as a storm breaks, hurling master, boatswain, and their assorted passengers about the stage while Ariel, Prospero's sprite, conjures the thunder by rattling a tin sheet.
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TRAVEL
August 8, 2016 | By Patricia Nickell, LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER
HAMILTON, Bermuda - This small island, only 21 square miles in size and 650 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., gave the world Bermuda shorts (still used as part of the island uniform), Bermuda onions (still used in island cuisine), and Bermuda grass (still used on the island's ubiquitous golf courses). Bermuda has earned literary cred, as well. An early chronicler of its infamous Triangle, William Shakespeare, used it as the shipwreck setting of The Tempest, making it the only New World location the Bard ever cited by name.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong acting and bold direction too often overshadow the work that a design team contributes to a play's success. In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's staging of The Tempest, the designers provide all the elements that make this production memorable. Not that the actors and director Jim Helsinger don't uphold the Festival's high standards. Greg Wood delivers a compelling, sympathetic performance as Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan exiled for 15 years on a remote island with his daughter Miranda (the earnest and endearing Kelsey Formost)
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Jim Rutter, FOR THE INQUIRER
Theater companies cut Shakespeare to reflect casting, to indulge shortened attention spans, or to center the play on a director's artistic vision or insight, among other reasons. Curio Theatre's current production of The Tempest proves that a bit of risk lies in any of these approaches. And, like any gamble, it also hints at large, if quick, rewards. The Tempest's traditional three-hour run time presents one of Shakespeare's most straightforward plots. Courtly treachery dethroned Duke Prospero (Brian McCann)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It figures that Julie Taymor, theater magician of The Lion King , film conjurer of Across the Universe , Shakespeare interpreter who made her movie debut with Titus , would be drawn to The Tempest , the one about the sorcerer who unsettles the seas before settling scores. Boldly Taymor changes Prospero's gender, casting the magnificent Helen Mirren as Prospera, cast away with her daughter, Miranda, on a remote island where the sorceress rescues the sprite Ariel and enslaves the creature Caliban.
NEWS
May 22, 2007 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
There are few theatrical experiences more transformative than a first encounter with Shakespeare. His portrayal of the human soul in every guise, 400 years on, remains vital and magical. He has birthed generations of theater lovers, and despite the many distractions invented for potential audiences in the years since the Globe Theater's first opening night, he still manages to fill houses across the actual globe. Of course, transformations can go the other way too, and there may be no more scarring dramatic experience than sitting through a long night of bad Shakespeare.
NEWS
April 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The Tempest, Shakespeare's last play, is stuffed with juicy roles and theatrical opportunities: a magical island full of mysterious creatures, an exiled duke turned wizard, a shipwreck, a love story, and an enslaved sprite who casts spells on buffoons and drunks and fops and wicked aristocrats. It's a strange, gorgeous world. So it's an odd Tempest that takes place on a bare stage. Even odder, this latest production from Philadelphia Shakespeare Festival stars the monster Caliban.
NEWS
August 17, 2003 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a performance last week, a World War II veteran approached actress Millicent Sparks. "You made me cry," he said. During another show, Catharine Slusar spotted an entire row of women sobbing. The two performers are used to touching audiences, but they've been surprised by the emotional reaction to the National Constitution Center's multimedia production Freedom Rising. Combining high-tech film and slide projections with an actor as storyteller, the show (free with museum admission)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
From the very beginning, the production of The Tempest by the Lantern Theater establishes that the play belongs to Prospero. Before the first scene's storm, we see Prospero sitting on a sort of natural throne built into the top of the hill suggested by Nick Embree's earthy, vine-covered set. From his perch, Prospero looms over the compact St. Stephen's Theater playing area, providing a strong visual reminder that nothing will occur in the play...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The opening scene of Louis Rackoff's new production of The Tempest, on view through April 12 at the People's Light & Theatre Company, makes you eager to see what follows. On a platform at stage right, the magician Prospero is writing the story you're about to witness, complete with stage directions and introductory dialogue: Master: Boatswain, - Boatswain: Here, master; what cheer? And immediately we hear those words shouted as a storm breaks, hurling master, boatswain, and their assorted passengers about the stage while Ariel, Prospero's sprite, conjures the thunder by rattling a tin sheet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
He is a man of many parts, this Prospero - priest, judge, ruler, philosopher - but, most of all, he is a magician, a conjurer. Exiled on a verdant island, the focal character in Shakespeare's The Tempest calls up a storm, a masque, a rich banquet as his pleasure dictates - and, when he tires of making such miracles himself, dispatches his servant Ariel to roam through the island, performing tricks of hypnosis and even ventriloquism. There's an altogether logical basis, therefore, for the one-man Tempest that a young actor named Thaddeus Phillips is performing through Sept.
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