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Caller Id

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BUSINESS
August 31, 1994 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Victims of obscene telephone calls in Pennsylvania can breathe easier, starting tomorrow. All they have to do is subscribe to Caller ID. The Bell Atlantic-Pennsylvania service, of value in many nonobscene scenarios as well, lets you know the telephone number of incoming callers. This allows subscribers to decide whether or not to pick up the phone. The special equipment needed to use the service also stores those numbers, so you'll also have a record of incoming calls.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
New Jersey's statewide rollout of Caller ID has been under way since 1988, but a few areas of South Jersey may not get the new service until October 1993, according to New Jersey Bell. "We would like to have 100 percent availability today because we would have more sales if we did," said Jim Carrigan, spokeman for New Jersey Bell, who added that the company was making Caller ID available as quickly as it could. For now, 80 percent of the state has Caller ID, Carrigan said.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite warnings that some lives might be endangered, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission yesterday voted to allow Bell of Pennsylvania to offer Caller ID, a service that allows customers to see the phone numbers of callers before answering the phone. On a 3-to-1 vote, the PUC made only minor modifications in plans for Caller ID, which vice chairman William H. Smith described as a valuable service to help fire and ambulance companies save lives and to discourage obscene phone calls and false alarms.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Bell of Pennsylvania's proposal to begin Caller ID service suffered a setback yesterday when a Commonwealth Court judge blocked the service from being offered to the public starting on Jan. 9. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission had ruled earlier that the service could begin next month. But Judge James Crumlish Jr. said yesterday that the service, which tells a phone-call recipient the number of the party that is calling, could be offered only to emergency-service providers and not to the general public until his court had considered arguments against the service.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1994 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bell Atlantic-Pennsylvania is seeking state approval to start offering Caller ID, a service that lets you know what number a call is being made from before you answer the phone. The proposal, filed March 7, must be approved by the Public Utility Commission. Bell Atlantic would like to begin the service in August. Caller ID, which has been likened to an electronic peephole, aroused opposition over privacy concerns when it was first proposed in 1989. But it has a good chance of sailing through this time because a new state law requiring stringent consumer protections has answered the concerns of many former opponents.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Caller ID is dead in Pennsylvania, in its present form, but could be resurrected in a new one. The State Supreme Court yesterday ruled the service Bell of Pennsylvania wants to market to customers, displaying to the person receiving an incoming call the telephone number from which it was dialed, violates the state Wiretap Act. Bell said it plans to go back to the Public Utility Commission with a new Caller ID-style plan. The new plan would offer "blocking," so that any caller who didn't want the person receiving the call to obtain his number would simply dial 67 before making the call, said Bell of Pennsylvania spokesman Eric Rabe.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bell of Pennsylvania pulled a little surprise yesterday in front of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. In oral arguments over Caller ID - the optional service that would let a subscriber see, on an attachment to the telephone, the phone number of an incoming call - Bell said it would be happy to offer all customers free and unlimited ways of blocking the service. For more than two years, Bell had publicly maintained that giving callers the option of blocking Caller ID would defeat its purpose.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court said yesterday that Caller ID - the service that lets subscribers see the phone number of an incoming call - would violate the state Wiretap Act "and cannot now be offered in Pennsylvania. " That's a setback for those who would like to screen calls before picking up the phone. But it's a victory for people who don't want to reveal their own phone numbers every time they make calls. Opponents of Caller ID, which Bell of Pennsylvania first tried to offer more than three years ago, have fought the service on the grounds that it threatens privacy and violates both the Wiretap Act and privacy guarantees in the state constitution.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1990 | By Brenda Flory, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Consumer advocates called upon Congress yesterday to pass legislation that would allow telephone users to block Caller ID - a new service that allows the recipient of a call to see the caller's phone number on a video device. Regional telephone companies, including Bell Atlantic Corp., of Philadelphia, have been marketing Caller ID as a way to prevent obscene or harassing phone calls. But consumer groups say Caller ID forces callers, perhaps unknowingly, to disclose their numbers to insurance agents and department stores.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | By LARRY B. KLING
The telephone rings. You run to get it, but when you see who's calling, you think better of answering and let the phone jangle. Videophone? Well, not quite. Welcome to the world of Caller ID, one of a raft of enhanced-calling services available from New Jersey Bell beginning this month. Caller ID enables New Jerseyans to become the first in the country to see the phone number of an incoming call to their homes or businesses. The number is displayed on a device you can get from Bell Atlantic, New Jersey Bell's parent company, or another vendor.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
I TAKE PLEASURE in making the life of a scammer more difficult. When I get calls offering me a too-good-to-be-true mortgage refinance or vacation-club membership, I listen. I then ask questions, making them think they've got a fish on the hook. And then I let them know that I know they're trying to scam me. You should always be careful when engaging a caller you don't know. Do not give out any personal information. But we hear so many stories about people being hoodwinked that I was delighted to get a number of responses from readers who, like me, can't resist fighting back.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Finding the hoaxer who made a series of bomb threats to officials in Camden on Thursday morning proved to be no whodunit, since the caller used his own phone and police tracked him down within a half-hour through caller ID, authorities said. As officials evacuated buildings and brought canine dogs to the scenes, and public transportation suffered minor disruption, police tracked the call to an address in Collingswood. Alon Adams, 25, of the 500 block of Collings Avenue, was arrested at his home and charged with several counts of creating a false public alarm.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a brazen burglary at the police precinct and you'll understand what the Federal Trade Commission was up against. For weeks, consumers had been complaining about robocalls seeming to come from inside the FTC itself - Caller ID showed 877-382-4357, the toll-free number that translates as 877-FTC-HELP. The recorded calls directed recipients to a website called FTCRefund.com, gave them a six-digit "Seizure ID Number," and suggested that they were due a refund from "American Consumer Group Inc. " But it was all a fraud, the FTC said Monday.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine the terror of receiving a middle-of-the-night phone call from someone who says he's inside your house watching you - especially when the number displayed on your cell-phone caller ID is your home number. Four Montgomery County women experienced that scenario firsthand in late April, ultimately leading to recent jail time for two people who illegally used the services of an online company called SpoofCard. For a fee, the company, started in 2005, allows users to change what someone sees on a caller ID display when a phone call is received, according to its Web site.
NEWS
October 3, 2005 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baby boomers, born in the world B.I. - before the Internet - saw the everyday-ization of the personal computer, the cell phone, and MP3 players. Now, as they care for aging parents and, in time, themselves, they may well be looking at smart beds that monitor sleep patterns, teddy bears that pick up speech pattern changes, and medicine dispensers that tell them when to take their pills. Those devices already exist, and more are on the way as technology increasingly becomes a tool to help older people live independently.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2002 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission is debuting a new Web site today aimed at helping consumers choose a local-phone company. The site - www.utilitychoice. org - allows consumers to compare the features and prices of some of the companies that sell local-phone service in their area. "Well-educated consumers are the drivers of a competitive market," PUC chairman Glen R. Thomas said. "It's our job to provide consumers with the resources to help them. " Here's how the site works: A consumer types in his or her area code and three-digit prefix, then clicks the "Compare Plans" link.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One of the women whose federal lawsuit led to Wednesday's ruling ordering that the 1920 plaque listing the Ten Commandments be removed from the Chester County courthouse received two threats yesterday. Margaret Downey, founder and president of the Freethought Society of Greater Philadelphia, who along with atheist Sally Flynn filed the suit, said she received two threats yesterday morning, by phone and e-mail. Downey said the telephone call from a man was laced with obscenities and included the warning: "You're going to get it. " "It was a pretty horrible phone call," said Downey, adding that she retrieved the telephone number from a Caller ID device and reported it to Birmingham Township police.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | By David Oropallo
As I sit at home on a fine Saturday morning, relaxing with a cup of coffee, the morning paper, and a great view of the birds gathering for their breakfast, my telephone starts to ring. I glance at the Caller ID and it comes up "unavailable. " I can feel my relaxed, peaceful mood being replaced by subdued anger - subdued just in case the call is a family member in some sort of need. "Hello?" "Hi, Mr. Oropallo, I am from Super Duper Security and we will be in your neighborhood and would like to stop by and . . . " Feeling assaulted, ?the hairs standing on the back of my neck, I interrupt, loudly and firmly: "Please put me on your do-not-call list!"
BUSINESS
October 27, 2000 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Verizon Communications customers who are troubled by telemarketers have a new tool at their disposal, but they have to pay for it. It is a service known as Call Intercept, which Verizon touts as especially useful in enabling consumers to avoid calls from companies that skirt federal telemarketing restrictions. Although federal rules allow consumers to ask not to be called again, many complain that they are unable to invoke that right because they can't figure out who is calling them.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | by Alec Wilkinson
A person shrinks from dialing the phone these days. Caller ID - that hardly seems sporting. Now you can buy a phone at the Counter Spy Shop on Madison Avenue (it's expensive, $3,900) that can detect the changes that occur in a person's voice when he is lying. The phones come with videos that instruct you to ask innocent questions - What's the date? How do you spell your name? The person's answers establish a pattern of readings for truthful responses against which you measure the rest of his remarks.
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