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Calligraphy

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NEWS
August 13, 1986 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
As poems go, this one, titled "Brothers," isn't very long. Four lines, in fact. But those four lines got Sarah and Herman Lazarus winging on an intellectual adventure. "It was my first translation," Sarah Lazarus was saying yesterday. "It not only encouraged me to do more, but I like to say it got my husband and me involved in yet another joint project. " The product of that joint project is a privately published book, Selected Poems from the Tang and Song Dynasties, with translations from the Chinese by Sarah Lazarus and calligraphy by Herman Lazarus.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, FOR THE INQUIRER
Computerized calligraphy sounds like an oxymoron if ever there was one. But Linda DiOttavio figures calligraphy is calligraphy, no matter how it's done. And since the computer age has touched nearly every facet of life, why not calligraphy? DiOttavio, who calls her business the Guest List, uses a computer program to create by machine what traditional calligraphers do with hand stroke after painstaking hand stroke. And the finished product - be it a wedding invitation, birth announcement, Christmas card or notice of a new law firm - looks much the same as a hand-written item, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Crystal States is crafty, so naturally, she's planning to make a lot of the elements for her September nuptials. But before she attempts all those do-it-yourself projects, she'll do it with others. Between the exploding maker movement where no project is too complicated to attempt, and a wedding industry where a 20 percent to 40 percent markup is standard, there are now a growing number of businesses offering brides DIY classes - calligraphy, invitation design, cookie-stamping.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To be a successful artist, you need a clear mind. That is the lesson one of South Korea's best-known calligraphers, Jin-Hwa Kim, has learned in his half-century of work. "With a clear mind, your calligraphy will be clear and straight," said the 59-year-old Kim, speaking through an interpreter. He was at the Nul-Bom Restaurant in the Benson East apartment complex at Routes 611 and 73, where an exhibition of his work was held last week. "Especially when writing [Bible]
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If your all-time favorite book was a John Grisham thriller, wouldn't you hesitate to admit it? And if your wife had an unpublished novel lying around the house, wouldn't you be embarrassed to trumpet this unsung masterpiece as your favorite? As it happens, no such concerns afflict the participants in the Free Library's summer lobby exhibition. Among the three Grisham enthusiasts in the show is former 76ers coach Fred Carter; the shameless wife-promoter is writer Stephen Fried.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Over the last several years, the department of Far Eastern Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art has periodically organized special displays to call attention to aspects of its Japanese collection. The latest of these, assembled by associate curator Felice Fischer in three small galleries next to the Japanese garden on the second floor, deals with Japanese Buddhist art. Fischer has chosen the objects to suggest the range and quality of the museum's holdings in this area. They include painting, sculpture and several examples of calligraphy by the contemporary master Munakata Shiko.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is an old Japanese poem that goes something like this: The breeze ceases; Still the blossoms tumble. All is stillness as you enter a mountain. Then, a lone bird sings. You feel the mountain's stillness More deeply still. Zen master Fukushima Keido, his eyes closed, kneels motionless before a long sheet of white paper. A hundred faces watch him. He is silent, like a clock about to ring. His eyes open. He lifts a thick brush from a tray. He daubs it on a jet black inkstone, crouches forward, and presses the brush to the top of the paper.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2001 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Japanese Nanga painters take as much notice of life as of art. Freshness of response is their strong point, and they know how to make the mundane interesting. This is obvious in the very appealing exhibition "Zenga-Nanga" at Haverford College, featuring calligraphy and Zen and Nanga paintings from the 17th through 19th centuries. It's a display that treads lightly but firmly across its long time span. Working in an often-impressionistic technique, these artists never make a pompous picture, though their hand-lettering may be bold or roughly brushed.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Until I read Carol Solomon's introduction to the catalog for "Memory, Place, Desire: Contemporary Art of the Maghreb and Maghrebi Diaspora," I'd been under the impression that the area of North Africa known as the Mahgreb was Morocco. In fact, as visiting professor Solomon - who organized the exhibition of contemporary art from that region for Haverford College's Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, - explains in much greater detail, the Maghreb comprises most of North Africa west of Egypt and is sometimes said to include Egypt.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Crystal States is crafty, so naturally, she's planning to make a lot of the elements for her September nuptials. But before she attempts all those do-it-yourself projects, she'll do it with others. Between the exploding maker movement where no project is too complicated to attempt, and a wedding industry where a 20 percent to 40 percent markup is standard, there are now a growing number of businesses offering brides DIY classes - calligraphy, invitation design, cookie-stamping.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Until I read Carol Solomon's introduction to the catalog for "Memory, Place, Desire: Contemporary Art of the Maghreb and Maghrebi Diaspora," I'd been under the impression that the area of North Africa known as the Mahgreb was Morocco. In fact, as visiting professor Solomon - who organized the exhibition of contemporary art from that region for Haverford College's Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, - explains in much greater detail, the Maghreb comprises most of North Africa west of Egypt and is sometimes said to include Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Gordon S. Converse will pretty much have the week between Christmas and New Year's Day to itself with an online sale of Chinese and Asian art and collectibles that starts at 12:30 p.m. Dec. 29 at www.liveauctioneers.com . The nearly 500 lots include vases and other porcelains, fish tanks, cricket cages, furniture, figurines, and traditional and contemporary paintings. Many of the lots are already attracting attention online. As of Tuesday morning, most of the focus was on a 9-by-9-inch brush pot made of rare huanghuali wood (akin to rosewood)
NEWS
April 28, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Haddonfield native Deborah Remington, 79, a Manhattan-based abstract artist whose work featuring mechanical and organic references has been exhibited all over the world, died of cancer Wednesday, April 21, at CareOne in Moorestown. Though Miss Remington's great-uncle was Frederic Remington, the famous artist who captured the American West in his action-filled paintings, she made only side references to him when speaking of artistic talent in her genes, said those who knew her. She wanted to make a name for herself and focus on her own abstract niche.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The paintings that Eugene Baguskas is showing at the More Gallery are immensely appealing, as much for their atavistic vitality as for their subject, which ostensibly is nature. I say "ostensibly" because one senses a romantic undercurrent, and perhaps autobiographical symbolism, in these scenes of crashing waterfalls, salmon swimming upstream, and quizzical moose. Among the nine oils, Sunrise neatly summarizes the painter's program. Under an orange sky reflected in a mirror-flat lake, two Canada geese fly across two improbably converging waterfalls, as a bear perched on a rock stares at the viewer.
NEWS
February 8, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With a steady hand and a delicate touch, Grace Heslin used the nib of an ink pen to begin the lines that form chancery calligraphy. Handwriting in the style of 15th-century royalty, and still a must for diplomas and other serious documents, requires practice and patience, Heslin said. For her, it is a calming and fun art. "Some people don't like it - it's too tedious and too time-consuming," Heslin said. "I love it. I find all the arts relaxing. " Calligraphy is as old as the written word, said Anne Binder, immediate past president and executive director of the Association for the Calligraphic Arts, an international organization headquartered in South Bend, Ind. "We are artists who see our images in the form of signs, symbols and letters as opposed to a painter who might see still lifes and seascapes," Binder said.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the Schwenkfelder Library and Heritage Center prepares to reopen part of its $3.7 million addition next week, curator Candace Perry is calm. "As long as there aren't any last-minute typos [in the exhibit panels or anything else] and nothing breaks, yeah, calm is the word," she said. Six months of construction and funding from mostly private sources added 15,000 square feet to the original 9,000-square-foot brick building on Seminary Street that dates to the 1950s. When the project is completed June 24, there will be more room for local-history and museum displays, more storage, and better access to the 50,000-volume library.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Japanese Nanga painters take as much notice of life as of art. Freshness of response is their strong point, and they know how to make the mundane interesting. This is obvious in the very appealing exhibition "Zenga-Nanga" at Haverford College, featuring calligraphy and Zen and Nanga paintings from the 17th through 19th centuries. It's a display that treads lightly but firmly across its long time span. Working in an often-impressionistic technique, these artists never make a pompous picture, though their hand-lettering may be bold or roughly brushed.
LIVING
December 19, 1999 | By Shelly Phillips, FOR THE INQUIRER
With infinite patience and just the hint of a brogue, Ann McKenna teaches knitting at the Elder Craftsmen Shop in Ardmore. She's working on an Irish fisherman's sweater, like those she sold for 17 years at a store that was nearby. This snug nonprofit shop, where McKenna volunteers, teaching her craft and selling her products, is on shaky financial footing. It closed twice before. And twice before it sputtered back to life. This could be the third - and final - closing. After 40 years, the Elder Craftsmen Shop of Philadelphia, now on Lancaster Avenue in Ardmore, has run out of angels, funding, and all but the slimmest spark of hope.
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