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Calypso

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NEWS
May 14, 1990 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Saturday night's soca and calypso concert at the Uptown Theater promised one of the most intriguing bills of the year. Arrow, the Mighty Sparrow, Shadow, Lord Kitchener, Duke, and Denise Plummer - all major stars in the English-speaking Caribbean - were slated to perform as part of the Africamericas Festival in an evening of salty, ebullient dance music. The theater was filled with an air of unexpected mystery and unpredictability. Unfortunately, the mysteries on everyone's mind were these: Would the tour bus ever arrive?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Down home in the Caribbean, the pop phenomenon known as Arrow has taken heat for tampering with one of the oldest and most revered of musical forms - calypso. Foremost among his "crimes": depoliticizing calypso, stripping it of wry criticism against the government, the police and the upper-class establishment. Moreover, Arrow has dared to integrate foreign pop styles - ranging from American hip-hop to Latin American rhumba and salsa, Jamaican reggae and French Caribbean zouk.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you were to ask John Furgione, principal of Lenape Regional High School, what his favorite school activity was, he'd take the diplomatic way out and say they were all special. But if Furgione listed his five favorite spring activities, the annual Junior Human Relations Commission's Human Diversity Day would come up. Each year, Human Diversity Day is held at the 1,900-pupil high school to heighten awareness of religious, racial and cultural differences. And one reason Furgione was looking forward to this year's event was the reggae music, part of the festivities for this year's theme, "Diversity Through the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012
What is it? The owners of Calypso (formerly of the Chestnut Hill Farmers Market) went mobile last year with Mini Trini, featuring a simple menu of delicacies from the Caribbean island of Trinidad. Real street: Owner Iman Marcano said their most popular item is the traditional street food called double. "The same way you buy hot dogs on the street, [double is] what people are selling on the corners in Trinidad," Marcano said. A double is fried dough (bara) filled with curried chickpeas (chana)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many things can be said about the music of soca man Arrow, but one thing stands out quickly: This man is a businessman. A few minutes into his hourlong set at Katmandu on Saturday night, Arrow, who had set up a table of recordings and memorabilia, said the audience would be able to augment its CD collection. And that's basically what the night was all about - gettin' paid. Arrow - Alphonsus Cassell of Montserrat - has almost abandoned one of the calypsonian's main functions: to provoke thought through intelligent, topical lyrics.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
In they poured, hundreds and hundreds of parents and children. They came in fancy dresses and suits to the Samuel Fels Junior High School at Devereaux Avenue and Langdon Street on Wednesday for the District 7 Festival of the Arts, an annual program of music and art dating back at least 20 years. In the school's hallways, students from Frankford High School's ceramics class demonstrated their skills. Denise Piotrowski, 18, carefully carved out diamond shapes in her clay jar and later drew in wavy lines around the rim. Debby Zukowski, also 18, worked at a potter's wheel, smoothing and shaping the wet clay.
NEWS
December 4, 2006 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
When Sonny Rollins played the Kimmel Center Friday night, he didn't play his horn as much as he had a series of conversations - with his band and with his audience. To the packed house, he spoke humbly and with pithy erudition. With his five backing musicians, he had close, intricate and telepathic musical conversations. Rollins gave his sidemen many opportunities to improvise, and usually the solos came as small- or larger-scale trades with the leader. Kicking off the show with "Sonny, Please," the title tune from Rollins' latest record, he and trombonist Clifton Anderson played the head with a blistering symbiosis.
NEWS
March 10, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
From one perspective, Sonny Rollins' marathon solos at the Kimmel Center Friday were displays of great artistic determination. Playing hard and not stopping until he'd exhausted his reserve of ideas, the 72-year-old saxophonist gnawed through chorus after chorus - in pursuit of those moments when the ordinary building blocks of jazz fall away, and a sparkling, genuinely new melody is born. Rollins found those ideas on just about every tune: In the middle of a lazy, sauntering "My One and Only Love," he departed from the melody to investigate a weeping theme of his own invention.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
You are forever impressed with those chiseled good looks, the well maintained dancer's body. And when he speaks, you are forever awed by the voice. The legendary Harry Belafonte, 60, twice married, father of four, is now an outspoken activist in the anti-nuclear movement, the poor people's campaign, civil rights, famine in Africa. He believes Third World countries should pool their cultures and assets, develop their own media and thus their own power. But the King of Day O, who opens tonight (the first of three)
NEWS
June 10, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
How could it be that a musical by Yip Harburg - who gave us the wonders of The Wizard of Oz and Finian's Rainbow - went unheard for half a century? The calypso show Jamaica, resurrected and adapted by the Prince Music Theater, originally was written by Harburg and Harold Arlen for Harry Belafonte. When illness forced Belafonte to drop out, Lena Horne replaced him, and the show was rewritten as a star vehicle for her in 1957. It was a dazzling cast, if not a dazzling vehicle: Ricardo Montalban, Ossie Davis and Alvin Ailey, all at the start of their fame, joined Horne, making her Broadway debut.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Born in Trinidad in 1983, trumpeter Etienne Charles melds the calypso music of his home with fiery bebop playing and R&B-inspired grooves. On Saturday night, Charles led a seven-piece band at Germantown's LaRose Jazz Club through music so exuberant that near the end of the evening, he admitted, "Some of you may be wondering if we ever play anything slow. " The boisterous crowd hardly seemed to be in the mood for ballads, but Charles didn't have anything quite that melancholy in mind anyway; instead, he tapped his blue-and-red suede loafers to count off a mid-tempo rendition of Bob Marley's "Turn Your Lights Down Low," during which solos were passed around the band in a round robin over a sunny reggae beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012
What is it? The owners of Calypso (formerly of the Chestnut Hill Farmers Market) went mobile last year with Mini Trini, featuring a simple menu of delicacies from the Caribbean island of Trinidad. Real street: Owner Iman Marcano said their most popular item is the traditional street food called double. "The same way you buy hot dogs on the street, [double is] what people are selling on the corners in Trinidad," Marcano said. A double is fried dough (bara) filled with curried chickpeas (chana)
NEWS
June 10, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
How could it be that a musical by Yip Harburg - who gave us the wonders of The Wizard of Oz and Finian's Rainbow - went unheard for half a century? The calypso show Jamaica, resurrected and adapted by the Prince Music Theater, originally was written by Harburg and Harold Arlen for Harry Belafonte. When illness forced Belafonte to drop out, Lena Horne replaced him, and the show was rewritten as a star vehicle for her in 1957. It was a dazzling cast, if not a dazzling vehicle: Ricardo Montalban, Ossie Davis and Alvin Ailey, all at the start of their fame, joined Horne, making her Broadway debut.
NEWS
December 4, 2006 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
When Sonny Rollins played the Kimmel Center Friday night, he didn't play his horn as much as he had a series of conversations - with his band and with his audience. To the packed house, he spoke humbly and with pithy erudition. With his five backing musicians, he had close, intricate and telepathic musical conversations. Rollins gave his sidemen many opportunities to improvise, and usually the solos came as small- or larger-scale trades with the leader. Kicking off the show with "Sonny, Please," the title tune from Rollins' latest record, he and trombonist Clifton Anderson played the head with a blistering symbiosis.
NEWS
March 10, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
From one perspective, Sonny Rollins' marathon solos at the Kimmel Center Friday were displays of great artistic determination. Playing hard and not stopping until he'd exhausted his reserve of ideas, the 72-year-old saxophonist gnawed through chorus after chorus - in pursuit of those moments when the ordinary building blocks of jazz fall away, and a sparkling, genuinely new melody is born. Rollins found those ideas on just about every tune: In the middle of a lazy, sauntering "My One and Only Love," he departed from the melody to investigate a weeping theme of his own invention.
SPORTS
August 7, 1999 | by Mark Kram , Daily News Sports Writer
Joey Jones just shrugged. In his baptism against national foes in the States Games of America 1999, Jones placed fourth in a field of nine in Advanced Spotlight figure skating competition at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. While he has come far in his short career and once considered himself a longshot to be here, Jones, the 13-year-old Southwest Philadelphia lad who a few years ago lived in a church shelter - looked up with a long frown at the final standings in the crowded lobby. "No," he said softly.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you were to ask John Furgione, principal of Lenape Regional High School, what his favorite school activity was, he'd take the diplomatic way out and say they were all special. But if Furgione listed his five favorite spring activities, the annual Junior Human Relations Commission's Human Diversity Day would come up. Each year, Human Diversity Day is held at the 1,900-pupil high school to heighten awareness of religious, racial and cultural differences. And one reason Furgione was looking forward to this year's event was the reggae music, part of the festivities for this year's theme, "Diversity Through the Arts.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Black History Month means reaching back to acknowledge African Americans' contributions of the past. It also means bridging cultural gaps in the present, through exposure to such groups as the Steel Kings, a seven-piece steel-drum ensemble that will appear Sunday at the Abington Friends School's Josephine Muller Auditorium as part of the school's Global Rhythms Family Concert Series. The Steel Kings can masquerade as a swing band, hang out with rockers, mimic the most popular rhythm-and-blues songs, even parade as a country- western group.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many things can be said about the music of soca man Arrow, but one thing stands out quickly: This man is a businessman. A few minutes into his hourlong set at Katmandu on Saturday night, Arrow, who had set up a table of recordings and memorabilia, said the audience would be able to augment its CD collection. And that's basically what the night was all about - gettin' paid. Arrow - Alphonsus Cassell of Montserrat - has almost abandoned one of the calypsonian's main functions: to provoke thought through intelligent, topical lyrics.
NEWS
May 14, 1990 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Saturday night's soca and calypso concert at the Uptown Theater promised one of the most intriguing bills of the year. Arrow, the Mighty Sparrow, Shadow, Lord Kitchener, Duke, and Denise Plummer - all major stars in the English-speaking Caribbean - were slated to perform as part of the Africamericas Festival in an evening of salty, ebullient dance music. The theater was filled with an air of unexpected mystery and unpredictability. Unfortunately, the mysteries on everyone's mind were these: Would the tour bus ever arrive?
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