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NEWS
October 30, 2005 | By Jeff Alexander FOR THE INQUIRER
From our seats at Phnom Penh's venerable Foreign Correspondents Club, with its wide, open-air views of the Tonle Sap River, we watched geckos flit across the mustard-colored walls. Sparrows swooped in the sunset as an elephant, ridden by a young mahout, walked the sidewalk below. Peddlers packed up their bagged soups, trays of fried locust, silver trinkets, and traditional Khmer scarves. Another typical late afternoon in Cambodia's capital city. Having arrived in the country's more likely tourist destination, Siem Reap, days earlier to explore the wondrous ruins of Angkor Wat and surrounding temples, it was difficult for us to imagine a worthy following act during the five-hour bus ride that led us southward to Phnom Penh along a stream of rice paddies, shacks, and farmers working the land.
TRAVEL
July 26, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
SIEM REAP, Cambodia - I saw Angkor Wat at dusk and burst into tears. I just wasn't ready. Riding a tuk-tuk , a conveyance bolted to a motorbike, we came out of a forest, and there it was. Across an encircling moat two football fields wide, the storied "pink light" fell on the 900-year-old walls and towers of the west entrance. Spectacular, ineffable, it beggared its advance notice. It took 500,000 workers and three million tons of sandstone to build Angkor Wat, "Temple City," a religious monument and administrative center of about 155 square miles that once was the heart of the Khmer Empire, and an urban complex of a million people.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
Beverage can maker Crown Holdings Inc., of Philadelphia, said today that it is expanding existing operations in Cambodia. Crown subsidiary Crown Asia Pacific Holdings Ltd. will install a second can line in a facility in Phnom Penh. The new line is expected to be operational by the end of 2011. The cost of the project was not disclosed.    - Inquirer Staff
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Amid a surge of interest in travel to Southeast Asia, the U.S. State Department has revised its consular information sheet on Cambodia to note precautions being taken by U.S. Embassy personnel there, including avoiding train and boat travel. The advisory calls attention to the limited military conflict between the government and Khmer Rouge insurgents, which "frequently intensifies during the dry season (November through May) and is possible in a number of areas, including along the border with Thailand, and especially in Battambang Province.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Isabelle Huppert looks thin and tired, but appropriately so, in The Sea Wall, an affecting flashback to French colonial Cambodia and a widow's struggle to guard her house, land, and family against forces of nature and human greed. Loosely based on Marguerite Duras' autobiographical novel of her adolescence in French Indochina, The Sea Wall is not an epic on the scale of Indochine. Rather, this circa-1930 drama offers a sumptuously photographed but brittle portrait of a mother and her two (almost)
LIVING
July 12, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, New York Daily News and USA Today
Sam Waterston, the prosecutor on TV's Law & Order, landed in Cambodia yesterday for a visit to demonstrate the misery wrought by buried land mines. "It's to continue to call attention to the need for de-mining and keep Cambodia in the world's eyes," the actor said of his trip. "At the moment, I'm just a sponge. I'm here to find out, put a real face to this country that I've imagined so intensely. " Waterston played the lead in the 1984 movie The Killing Fields, about the murderous 1975-79 rule of the Khmer Rouge, which continues to mine the country.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | By Laurie Hollman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No outrageous kicks here, no big, jerky movements or extravagant leaps. In this chorus line, the little girls take small steps and speak gently with their hands, almost daintily, and with precision. One gesture can make a difference. A turn of the head. An arched hand. An undulating arm. It matters. Their teacher is an intense young man with a mop of dark hair and tender eyes. Chamroeun Yin learned Khmer court dance in a refugee camp in Thailand after fleeing his native Cambodia.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those who adored James Hart Jr. didn't know where in the world he would go next. But online, the 29-year-old left a digital trail of his adventures as he embraced his natural wanderlust. His blogs quoted Jack Kerouac. He shared photos of maps and art, and inspirational quotes. "You can buck tradition and others' expectations of you. You can triumph over your fears, by conquering your mind. You can take risks. And most of all, you can travel," he wrote on Facebook in June. "Jimmy" Hart, who grew up in Mantua, died doing all of those things.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The State Department has warned U.S. citizens to avoid travel in Cambodia in light of this month's political violence there, and several U.S. tour operators have canceled trips scheduled for July and August. Tour business in the country had been rising as political stability grew after a 1991 peace agreement that ended Cambodia's civil war, and the country had made efforts to encourage tourism, particularly at the famous Angkor Wat ruins. Cambodia is one of several Southeast Asian nations that had recently developed cachet as an exotic destination for adventurous travelers.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Sopheng Cheang, Associated Press
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - The top four surviving members of the brutal Khmer Rouge went on trial Monday before a tribunal aimed at finding justice for the 1.7 million people who died in Cambodia's "killing fields" of the 1970s. With the aging leaders all in their late 70s or early 80s, and with Khmer Rouge overlord Pol Pot long dead, the trial before the U.N.-backed panel represents the last, best chance for Cambodia to bring accountability to the Khmer Rouge leadership blamed for the deaths.
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TRAVEL
July 26, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
SIEM REAP, Cambodia - I saw Angkor Wat at dusk and burst into tears. I just wasn't ready. Riding a tuk-tuk , a conveyance bolted to a motorbike, we came out of a forest, and there it was. Across an encircling moat two football fields wide, the storied "pink light" fell on the 900-year-old walls and towers of the west entrance. Spectacular, ineffable, it beggared its advance notice. It took 500,000 workers and three million tons of sandstone to build Angkor Wat, "Temple City," a religious monument and administrative center of about 155 square miles that once was the heart of the Khmer Empire, and an urban complex of a million people.
FOOD
May 15, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On sunny weekend afternoons, in the shadow of an ornate, golden Buddhist temple, Mifflin Square in South Philadelphia is dotted with charcoal grills, chile-lacquered chicken wings, and thin-sliced fatty beef heavily seasoned with lemongrass sputtering over the coals. Women pound chilies, garlic, and dried shrimp to a paste to season the snappy unripe papaya for the lime-drenched salads they sell to passersby. This is what some people call Cambodia Town, where these authentic street foods sell for $1, and where there's an effort afoot to make the title official.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bay To already has a baseball scholarship to Fairleigh Dickinson. So why was the Neumann-Goretti speedster running sprints on a frigid January day, shackled by 10-pound ankle weights and restricted by a parachute? "I'm always working to get better," To said. "It doesn't matter if I have a scholarship or not. " Hard work and sacrifice are family traits, and ones the 5-foot-11, 185-pound rightfielder/pitcher hopes will alter generations. The Southwest Philadelphia resident (65th Street and Lindbergh Avenue)
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those who adored James Hart Jr. didn't know where in the world he would go next. But online, the 29-year-old left a digital trail of his adventures as he embraced his natural wanderlust. His blogs quoted Jack Kerouac. He shared photos of maps and art, and inspirational quotes. "You can buck tradition and others' expectations of you. You can triumph over your fears, by conquering your mind. You can take risks. And most of all, you can travel," he wrote on Facebook in June. "Jimmy" Hart, who grew up in Mantua, died doing all of those things.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE LETTER came postmarked from Cambodia. The author of the letter couldn't write. The recipient of the letter couldn't read. The author - an old man - had paid someone to write to his daughter in Philadelphia for him: "I'm dying. Come see me," he begged. The letter recipient asked her husband to read her the letter. Her heart sank. The woman, Phi Chhian, and her husband had fled Cambodia as refugees in 1981 after surviving Khmer Rouge work camps and losing their eldest daughter to the regime's unrelenting brutality.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Tropical storm nears St. Lucia CASTRIES, St. Lucia - St. Lucia shuttered schools and prepared to close the island's two airports while urging residents to finish preparations for the approach of strengthening Tropical Storm Chantal as it raced Monday toward the small islands of the Lesser Antilles. The fast-moving storm's maximum sustained winds were near 50 m.p.h. Monday evening with some strengthening expected over the next two days. Chantal was centered about 320 miles east-southeast of Barbados and was moving west-northwest at 26 m.p.h.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
Stephen Berg is a stay-at-home father and blogger It was pure serendipity that we adopted our son from Cambodia. While working in human resources at Marshall Field & Co., I befriended an 80-year-old children's department employee named Annie Carr. Though deeply religious - a dyed-in-the-wool Catholic - Annie wanted nothing more than to see us boys have a baby. Scott and I were exploring an adoption from China. One afternoon I returned from lunch to a frantic and breathless voice mail from Annie: "Steve, I've found a baby for you and Scott.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Global outsourcing, labor arbitrage, the HR of international economics - all important and controversial topics. Unfortunately, Some Other Kind of Person has little or nothing to say about any of them except the cliches that stopped being funny years ago; Eric Pfeffinger's flat farce traffics mostly in contempt. Here's the setup: Bill, a rumpled American (David Ingram), incompetent with people but great with numbers, has come to Cambodia on business with his crass colleague Lakshmi (the excellent speed-talker Nandita Shenoy)
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five grew up on the hard streets of North Philadelphia, one in the killing fields of Cambodia. Two are social workers, one is a nurse, another a soldier who served two tours in Iraq. They are black, Latino, and Asian, all about the same age, all but two of them mothers, all bound to one another today through the happenstance of having long ago shared a particular middle-school teacher. Their intergenerational, multiracial friendship might be unusual in parts of the Philadelphia region, recently named among the nation's most segregated, but it thrives at Caryl Levin's house in Melrose Park.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - On a history-making trip, President Obama on Monday paid the first visit by an American leader to Myanmar and Cambodia, two Asian countries with troubled histories, one on the mend and the other still a cause of concern. Obama's fast-paced, pre-Thanksgiving trip vividly illustrated the different paths the regional neighbors are taking to overcome legacies of violence, poverty and repression. Cheered by massive flag-waving crowds, Obama offered long-isolated Myanmar a "hand of friendship" as it rapidly embraces democratic reforms.
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