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NEWS
January 6, 1990 | By Ron Avery and Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer Gabriel Escobar contributed to this report
In the end, Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell built an air-tight case - against himself. When he was read his constitutional rights and questioned by state investigators into the wee hours yesterday at the Bellmawr state police barracks, Asbell's story of a high-speed chase and shootout on the streets of Camden on New Year's Day fell apart. Asbell, 46, resigned his office at the conclusion of the interrogation and voluntarily entered the Carrier Clinic, a pyschiatric facility in Somerset County.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two-Face was stoned-faced yesterday as a federal jury in Camden delivered a verdict that could send him to prison for the rest of his life. Juan "Two-Face" Rivera-Velez, 35, showed no reaction as the jury foreman announced four consecutive guilty verdicts, capping nearly eight days of deliberations in a high-profile narcotics trial in U.S. District Court in Camden. Rivera-Velez, nicknamed after his face was disfigured in an auto accident several years ago, was charged with carrying out one murder and attempting a second for convicted Camden drug kingpin Raymond Morales.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
HE BRAGGED to friends about the girls he "banged," showing them pornographic pictures on his cellphone. He let loose his lust at work, locking the conference room doors for illicit, paid trysts in front of windows overlooking Center City. He even offered baked treats made by his wife to his favorite escort and discussed his daughters with her. But worst of all, Brian Meehan's conquests were teenage girls forced into prostitution, and he was a prominent Center City attorney introduced to them by clients, according to a Philadelphia investigating grand jury.
NEWS
May 23, 2001
For quite some time, there have been legislative negotiations concerning a bill that would impose an enhanced degree of state control over the governmental affairs of the city of Camden. A number of the key points of this legislation have received public discussion. However, as one of the bill's principal architects is fond of pointing out, "the devil is in the details. " These details have not been shared with the city's elected representatives. Perhaps this is attributable to a paternalistic assumption that Camden's elected officials cannot know what is good for them and the city.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angelo J. Errichetti, 84, a former Camden mayor and state senator who was South Jersey's premier Democratic power broker in the decade before his 1981 bribery conviction in the Abscam scandal, has died after a long illness. He had been living in Ventnor, N.J. During two mayoral terms, starting in 1973, he built a reputation as an unflagging booster for his hometown, where his father, a Neapolitan immigrant, stoked coal at the shipyard to feed seven children. Mr. Errichetti's efforts to revive Camden's moribund economy were said to occupy 12 hours on a typical day, yet he took on a second office simultaneously.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court ruled Tuesday that an arbitrator cannot force New Jersey taxpayers to pay for raises he awarded to firefighters in Camden. A three-judge appellate panel threw out a 2011 arbitrator's award giving the firefighters raises totaling more than $1 million from 2009 through last year. The decision shows just how complicated it is to pay for services in Camden, a city that ranks among the nation's most impoverished and that has a tiny tax base. About 70 percent of the city's $150 million budget is funded by state aid. When contract talks between the city's firefighters and government could not be settled, the case was sent to an arbitrator.
NEWS
February 5, 1986
It might be going just a bit too far to say "Mmmm, mmmm, good!" but the Campbell Soup Co.'s decision to modernize operations in Camden is an encouraging long-range commitment. Campbell Soup was founded in Camden in 1869 and has been a significant part of the city's economy for more than a century. While there was never any doubt about company headquarters staying in Camden, speculation has been rampant for years about a possible closing of production lines. Campbell's main plant in Camden was built in 1907.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | BOB LARAMIE/ DAILY NEWS
Hank Williams Jr. performs last night at the opening of the Waterfront Entertainment Centre in Camden. Williams was the first performer ever to appear at the $56 million, 25,000-capacity center, which can be opened up for lawn viewing during the warmer months and closed for indoor seating in winter.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | DON MURRAY/FOR THE DAILY NEWS
Fire engulfs a Camden church yesterday as firefighters work to keep it from spreading to nearby homes. The fire at Holy Temple Church of Christ, 34th Street and Mickle Boulevard, started about 4:15 p.m. It was under control two hours later. No injuries were reported. The cause was unknown, but the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms was notified of the fire, police said. The ATF is investigating the nationwide arsons of black churches. In May in Glassboro, two churches were allegedly burned by arsonists.
NEWS
February 20, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Some will tell you that the Victor is a metaphor for Camden's renaissance - specifically, some residents of this industrial-to-residential conversion, as well as the historic building's developer, Carl Dranoff. "And, with its conversion, I believe the Camden area is being decisively and forever turned around, and will be the next great neighborhood in the region," Dranoff said. Dick Hailey, 68, an officer of the New Jersey Superior Court and retired Camden police sergeant who was born and raised in Camden, moved to the complex from Cherry Hill in September.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Demola Onifade has made a positive impact at Camden Catholic. He just hasn't done much of anything on the basketball court. Onifade is the Distinguished Honors student - with one "B" and the rest "A"s in every marking period since April 2013 - who once took the teacher's place at the blackboard during an Algebra II lesson to better explain a concept to his classmates. "That sounds like him," Camden Catholic senior forward Brendan Crawford said of his studious teammate. Onifade is the senior who went to the home of a freshman soccer player who had broken his leg to offer encouragement and advice on bouncing back from an injury.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a second day of somber demonstrations in Camden, nearly 50 people gathered in front of the federal courthouse on Market Street and lay on the sidewalk Friday morning, their bodies outlined in white chalk. The "die-in," like many held around the nation, was meant to highlight the police-involved deaths of Eric Garner, who died in an apparent choke hold in Staten Island, N.Y., and Michael Brown, the Ferguson, Mo., man who was shot by a police officer. The gathering was held by the group Camden Churches Organized for People.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Amid all the headlines about mega-projects coming to Camden, a small store with big goals has opened in the city's Parkside section. The Made in Camden Store at 1216 Haddon Ave. aims to showcase local goods and support local entrepreneurs, Ajeenah Riggs says from behind the counter: "We want this to be a community-friendly space. " Riggs, 38, is a partner in the store with Eric Powell, founder of the My Heart BeatZ clothing line. She sees the modest establishment - which currently offers a few racks of hoodies, sweatshirts, and T-shirts - as a catalyst for local artisans, craftspeople, and producers of all kinds.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The marchers gathered by the steps of the Camden County Police Department, many holding signs. "Don't Shoot," "Camden Can't Breathe," the signs read. In front of the group of nearly 25, most of them city residents, an empty gray casket lay on the ground. Six men picked up the casket and walked it down Haddon Avenue, turning left toward the federal courthouse. Police cruisers blocked traffic at intersections as the marchers crossed. The peaceful gathering Thursday, which ended at City Hall, was meant to protest the police-involved deaths of black men in Missouri and New York, but also to focus on police actions in Camden.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden School Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard went to the source to get advice on how to improve the district's abysmal graduation rate. During a visit Wednesday afternoon to Woodrow Wilson High School, Rouhanifard shared some good news for the struggling district: 62 percent of the Class of 2014 graduated on time, compared with 56 percent in 2013. "We're proud of the entire school community," Rouhanifard told an 11th-grade English class. The news was even better for Wilson, which had the highest increase among the city's five traditional and magnet high schools.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Officer Jordan Plitt squeezed into a red chair designed for a kindergartner, extending his legs beneath a table just two to three feet high in Camden's Bonsall Elementary School. Next to him, in a same-size chair, was a smiling kindergartner with a ponytail. She peered at Page 30 of the children's book Snow , trying to copy a picture of a young boy skiing down a hill with a dog. "I don't know how to make a dog," Jeanette Ramos told Plitt, 24, who has been on the force for a year.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
All the guys who hung out at 10th and Lowell in Whitman Park had nicknames. There were Moose, Winky, Dickie Doo - and a wiry fellow they called Muscles. "That's because I didn't have any," explains Stan Bednarczyk, who's written and published My Wagging Tail , a detailed, deeply felt memoir about a Camden corner boy, the neighborhood he loved, and the man he became. The author, now 81, grew up the youngest of five children of an immigrant Polish couple who spoke little English.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DARLENE SMITH and her husband, William, watched with a mixture of pride and concern at what was going on in their South Philadelphia neighborhood. Abandoned properties were being bought and fixed up, and condos were springing up where empty lots once stood. The problem, as the Smiths saw it, was that open space was being gobbled up rapidly. Pretty soon there would be nothing but concrete and brick. Darlene, a longtime educator, and her husband had lived in that neighborhood for more than 30 years, and they felt that something needed to be done to save some space.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - The New Jersey Economic Development Authority on Tuesday approved $118 million in tax incentives for Subaru of America and an additional $40 million for Cooper Health System to relocate their operations in Camden. The health system, whose Cooper University Hospital already is a major presence in the city, intends to move 353 back-office jobs from Cherry Hill and Mount Laurel to Federal Street in downtown Camden and add 19 new jobs in the city, according to the application made to the EDA. Camden Mayor Dana Redd, who attended the EDA board's meeting, said the projects would help Camden return to its former glory as an economic hub of South Jersey.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the 35 years I've been writing about Camden, the city has often appeared to be on the verge of a comeback. But while a bit of skepticism is advisable - even amid the latest flurry of economic development announcements - I do get a sense of actual optimism in the air. Because the latest proposals look stronger, smarter, more realistic, and less grandiose than many of their predecessors. "I remember those grand announcements," says Cooper Health System Chairman George E. Norcross 3d. "Sadly, most of [them]
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