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Camden Children S Garden

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NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Holding signs reading "No Garden? No Fresh Food," "Where Will We Go?", and several that read, "Save the Camden Children's Garden," more than 100 people rallied Tuesday to muster support in the waterfront garden's fight against a March 31 eviction notice from the state. The protesters had planned to march from the garden to City Hall, but were spared that trip. Mayor Dana L. Redd and several City Council members went to the rally to add support. The garden, Redd and others said, must stay where it is. "We have our challenges," Redd said, listing education, public safety, and others.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
By Mike Weilbacher The Camden Children's Garden, the jewel on the waterfront tucked between the Adventure Aquarium and Wiggins Park, has been told by its landlord, the state of New Jersey, to remove its exhibits from three of its four acres by March 31. While not quite an eviction notice, the garden would be forced to destroy its signature attractions. Goodbye butterfly house, dinosaur garden, giant teacups, train ride, and more. But the garden's not going down without a fight, and founder Mike Devlin and friends are busy testifying, lining up their political ducks, organizing a Facebook page, and threatening lawsuits.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There isn't much of Camden on the Camden waterfront, but what little there is can reliably be found at the Camden Children's Garden. Amid the lineup of high-priced venues that now front the Delaware, the horticulture-themed playground stands out as a lone homegrown attraction. Camden residents built it. Camden residents use it. Camden teenagers learn work skills there. Designed by the noted architect Steve Izenour, the city landmark celebrates South Jersey in all its wondrous variety: The billboard-style, corrugated-steel entrance gate is a whimsical love note to the region's truck gardens, seaside kitsch, and roadside signs.
NEWS
February 24, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was springtime in Camden yesterday, in an Alice-in-Wonderland sort of way. Azaleas and rhododendrons had sprouted on Riverside Drive, where four girls were planting ivy on a large dog and where a stack of musical notes sat by a half-bridge to nowhere. Outside the greenhouses at the Camden Children's Garden, a truck already contained a brightly colored gazebo and the other half of the bridge. Tomorrow it will head for the Pennsylvania Convention Center, where the Philadelphia Flower Show opens next weekend.
NEWS
November 11, 2002
I appreciated the Nov. 3 article "We're going it alone," which served as a wake-up call to the commuting public in presenting the difficulty involved with persuading people to give up their cars, if only for a day. I also wanted to point out that in New Jersey the terms carpooling and ride-sharing are not interchangeable. While census data do indicate a reduction in carpooling, they also indicate dramatic increases in use of mass transit, van-pooling and telecommuting; and an increase in biking and walking.
NEWS
November 14, 2002
Aquarium plan has its thorns As a board member of the Camden Children's Garden and an avid supporter of Gov. McGreevey, I am angered at the hypocrisy of the Oct. 31 editorial, "Parting the waters," which seems to support the proposed private acquisition of the state aquarium by Steiner & Associates of Columbus, Ohio. The Steiner plan has been in existence for 42 months. During that time, the garden has been a partner with the aquarium, yet Steiner has agreed to only one 20-minute meeting with the garden's leadership.
NEWS
October 1, 2003 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cheerful, shared entrance to the New Jersey State Aquarium and the Camden Children's Garden belies the stormy partnership within. Since shortly after the garden opened in 1999, the two waterfront tourist attractions have been at fierce odds over how to split ticket revenue. The garden even sued the aquarium last year, claiming that it had been shortchanged, an allegation that the aquarium denies. Now, as a private operator prepares to take over and expand the aquarium, the feud is coming to a head.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Little 5-year-old Taylor Sticklin was feeling smaller than usual. She'd walked into a garden straight out of a fairy tale. A beanstalk towered above her on the left, ficus trees dwarfed her on the right, and tall hollyhocks, astilbes and nicotianas surrounded her on both sides. Taylor let her imagination run wild "In the Giant's Garden" at the Philadelphia Flower Show. She giggled, played in water spouting from the 55-gallon can, and stared in amazement at a mammoth trowel and the gigantic insects and plants that made up the Camden City Garden Club's exhibit.
NEWS
March 18, 2005 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has long been an unhappy marriage. Now it could be heading for divorce. Two Camden waterfront neighbors, the newly privatized Adventure Aquarium and the Camden Children's Garden, have been trying to work out an agreement to combine ticket sales and share marketing and maintenance. But in a March 10 letter, the aquarium said it was ending talks and would "take various measures to physically separate our now distinct operations. " This means that when the aquarium reopens in May, visitors may no longer have access to the garden without buying a separate ticket from another booth.
NEWS
January 31, 2003 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Ali Sloan El yesterday submitted the terms under which he would withdraw a lawsuit that is holding up bond funding for the state's $175 million Camden recovery act. Sloan El said his terms were a compromise that would allow him to withdraw his Superior Court suit, which contends that the act is unconstitutional because it applies only to Camden and strips city residents of their right to vote. The proposal, which he submitted to state officials without guarantee of approval, includes: Providing 1,000 summer jobs for Camden youths.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013
Special Events Day-Off Camp: Rocks & Minerals Hands-on exploration of fossils, crystals & geodes. The Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy's Mill Rd.; Pre-registration required: 215-482-7300 x 110. $55; $45 members. Friday. 8 am-3 pm. Forest Forensics Workshop Decipher land use history through the careful examination of trees & landforms. The Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy's Mill Rd.; Pre-registration required: 215-482-7300 x 110. $15; $10 members. Sat. 1-3 pm. Germantown White House Exhibits Interactive exhibits featuring George Washington's family & household.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The name given this year's British-theme Philadelphia Flower Show is "Brilliant!," but the mood at the Camden Children's Garden display this week was anything but bright and sunny - more like cloudy with a chance of despair. As workers set up the fanciful, 320-square-foot exhibit, with a willow tunnel, shed, birdhouses, and dreamy vegetable garden and fruit trees, they couldn't help worrying about the future of the Children's Garden, which recently was ordered by the state to leave its waterfront site next to the Adventure Aquarium.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
By Mike Weilbacher The Camden Children's Garden, the jewel on the waterfront tucked between the Adventure Aquarium and Wiggins Park, has been told by its landlord, the state of New Jersey, to remove its exhibits from three of its four acres by March 31. While not quite an eviction notice, the garden would be forced to destroy its signature attractions. Goodbye butterfly house, dinosaur garden, giant teacups, train ride, and more. But the garden's not going down without a fight, and founder Mike Devlin and friends are busy testifying, lining up their political ducks, organizing a Facebook page, and threatening lawsuits.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first of what is likely to be a series of meetings to work out the future of the Camden Children's Garden was described as "productive" by the state senator who reopened negotiations over the garden's planned eviction. The meeting, which took place Tuesday at State Sen. Donald Norcross' Audubon office and lasted less than two hours, was the first time state Treasury officials and Children's Garden executive director Mike Devlin had met since December 2011. The state began trying to remove the Children's Garden from its waterfront location three years ago. Norcross called the meeting "productive" in a Facebook message and also said, "I hope this opens the door to an ongoing dialogue that will ensure the garden's work can continue in Camden City.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holding signs reading "No Garden? No Fresh Food," "Where Will We Go?", and several that read, "Save the Camden Children's Garden," more than 100 people rallied Tuesday to muster support in the waterfront garden's fight against a March 31 eviction notice from the state. The protesters had planned to march from the garden to City Hall, but were spared that trip. Mayor Dana L. Redd and several City Council members went to the rally to add support. The garden, Redd and others said, must stay where it is. "We have our challenges," Redd said, listing education, public safety, and others.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Camden garden should stay It's troubling that the state wants the Camden Children's Garden to make way for an expansion of the Adventure Aquarium ("Plowing it under," Feb. 1). The garden contributes so much to city residents through employing people, educating children, fighting obesity, and working with stakeholders in the neighborhoods to establish community gardens. The list of success stories and accolades for this organization is endless. Meanwhile, the aquarium hires a limited number of Camden residents, and how many local families can even afford to step into the place?
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While supporters of the Camden Children's Garden prepare this weekend for a march and speeches they will deliver at Tuesday's City Council meeting, State Sen. Donald Norcross (D., Camden) will be working to set up a meeting between garden supporters and state officials. Norcross said he would like to keep the Children's Garden, "a grassroots organization," where it is, near the Adventure Aquarium on Camden's waterfront, but in a way that both entities can "be there and flourish. " The aquarium, however, has told the state it wants to take over the space occupied by the nonprofit Children's Garden to expand its operation.
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