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Camden County

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NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years Camden City, under a state law, has provided sample ballots in Spanish because of its high concentration of residents who list Spanish as their primary language - more than 10 percent of its registered voters. But now the U.S. Department of Justice is mandating that every municipality in Camden County provide actual ballots, not just samples, and all election material in both English and Spanish. Under the federal Voting Rights Act, a mandate for bilingual ballots in a county is triggered when: At least 10,000, or 5 percent of the voting-age citizens of the county speak a language other than English at home and speak English less than "very well.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of the eight counties in the Philadelphia region, only Camden County lost population between April 2010 and July 2013, Census Bureau population estimates released Thursday show. Much of the county's 0.2 percent population loss represented residential fall-offs in the city of Camden (0.6 percent), Gloucester Township (0.5 percent), and Winslow (0.8 percent), census numbers showed. But there were notable exceptions on the New Jersey side of the Delaware, based on the Census Bureau's 2013 population estimates for the region's 340 municipalities.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state tournament was a showcase for Camden County schools, which won three of the six South Jersey boys' basketball crowns. The titlists were Highland in Group 4, Camden (Group 3), and Haddonfield (Group 2). The other South Jersey champions were Parochial A's Christian Brothers Academy of Monmouth County, Parochial B St. Augustine (Atlantic County), and Group 1 Florence (Burlington County). Thanks to Florence, Burlington County has the longest current streak of sectional champions.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | Associated Press
Camden County officials are outraged over a court program that rewards juvenile offenders with gifts such as computers and iPods for completing their probation, according to the Courier-Post of Cherry Hill. Freeholders issued a news release this week demanding the state courts end the program, which is offered only in Camden County. The statement described the program as a "disgraceful expenditure of taxpayers' funds" that sends the wrong message. The freeholders said many other children are working hard in school to get good grades or to find jobs to help their families and cannot afford iPods, notebook computers, and similar items.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By James Osborne, Darran Simon, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Efforts to create a Camden County regionalized police force will, for now, focus on specialized services such as a central detective bureau and SWAT team, officials said Thursday. A countywide force remains the goal, said Board of Freeholders spokeswoman Joyce Gabriel, but a combined detectives and K-9 unit may happen "before anything else. " The move, discussed at a closed-door meeting of county, municipal, and law enforcement officials Tuesday, was read by some as stepping back from plans to disband municipal police forces.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert D. Melson has resigned as Camden County's public safety director after three months on the job, Freeholder Annette Castiglione-Degan announced yesterday. In his resignation letter, dated May 5, Melson said that he plans to return to his rank as captain in the Cherry Hill Police Department. Melson had spent 26 years in the Cherry Hill department before accepting the $65,000-a-year position as county public safety director on Feb. 23. Melson, whose last day as director will be May 19, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horse-racing enthusiasts in Camden County have had two choices when gambling in person: Drive an hour to the nearest offtrack betting facility in New Jersey, or across the Delaware River to one in Philadelphia. Now, Camden County gamblers can bet on a shorter commute. Favorites, the state's fifth offtrack betting facility, opened Tuesday in Clementon. Penn National Gaming Inc., which is managing it, hopes the new site will draw South Jersey gamblers and, ultimately, compete with the betting parlors in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer / ELIZABETH VORHAUER
A three-alarm fire yesterday adamaged the Oaklyn Garden Apartments in Oaklyn, Camden County. No injuries were reported as a result of the blaze in the two-story, two-building, 20-unit complex at Newton and Oakland Avenues. The cause of the fire was under investigation.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
A 15-year-old boy was found shot multiple times Friday night in Camden County, officials said. The teenager was found in a wooded area near the 2400 block of Mount Ephraim Avenue in Woodlynne about 10:15 p.m., county officials said. An officer on patrol heard him calling for help, said Jason Laughlin, spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. The teen, whose name was withheld, was listed in critical and unstable condition at Cooper University Hospital. No arrests had been made.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
A 44-year-old man was arrested after he allegedly exposed himself in public and masturbated in front of a woman and her 15-year-old daughter Thursday afternoon in Camden County, police said. Gloucester Township police responded at 2:18 p.m. to a report of a man taking his clothes off on Oak Avenue. The officers arrested John Boyle Jr., who police said masturbated in front of the mother and daughter as they were getting into a car. A young boy also saw the incident, police said. Boyle, of Black Horse Pike in the township's Hilltop section, was charged with fourth-degree lewdness and was being held in the Camden County Correctional Facility with bail set at $2,500.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey registered the highest increase in the number of poor people in America between 2012 and 2013, while poverty dropped slightly in Philadelphia. In South Jersey, which includes Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, an additional 12,145 people became impoverished, a spike of 10 percent that year. In Philadelphia, while 9,000 residents moved out of poverty - a dip from 26.9 percent to 26.3 percent - the city was still the poorest of America's 10 largest cities. The findings were compiled in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey One-Year Estimates, a huge and diverse set of data based on a survey of people living at 3.5 million addresses throughout the nation.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
TEARS WILL BE shed Sunday night along the Atlantic City Boardwalk when one lucky lady is crowned Miss America. For Miss Delaware's family, win or lose, tears will flow - joyous tears for Brittany Lewis beaming up on the stage, and tears for her sister Gina Clarke-Lewis, who was slain in Camden County in 2010. "She's keeping Gina's memory alive just by being up there," Brenda Lewis said of her daughter. Brittany Lewis, 24, is about as close as it gets to a hometown favorite, having grown up a few miles away, across the inlet in Brigantine.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Leonard J. Zubrzycki, 82, of Pennsauken, who retired in 1994 as a professor of microbiology and immunology at Temple University School of Medicine, died Thursday, Sept. 4, at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, after a heart attack. Besides teaching at the medical school, "he directed the teaching laboratories in medical microbiology for most of his career at Temple," Dr. Toby Eisenstein said in a phone interview. Eisenstein, a professor of microbiology and immunology at the Temple medical school, said she was a longtime colleague of Dr. Zubrzycki.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The New Jersey Senate on Monday confirmed the nomination of a Haddon Heights lawyer and ally of South Jersey Democrats to Rutgers University's main governing body. William M. Tambussi's appointment to the board of governors was part of the Democratic-controlled Senate's unanimous approval of a package of Gov. Christie's nominees for various state positions. Tambussi, 56, replaces former Assembly Speaker Joseph J. Roberts Jr., also of Camden County. A higher-education restructuring act that passed in 2012 requires one of the governor's eight appointees to the 15-member board to be a Camden County resident.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The officials drove their cars around semitrucks and shipping crates, and parked in the large space between a licorice factory and Camden County's wastewater treatment plant. This industrial five-acre lot in Camden's Waterfront South neighborhood is slated to become Phoenix Park come spring. It would be the neighborhood's first access point to the Delaware River - and a welcome escape for the community, which has for decades been impeded from its riverbank by power, sewer, and cement plants, and an incinerator.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County officials have begun to explore the possibility of interim dredging to save a dying lake that is part of a cluster of Superfund sites. One scenario suggested by the county to paint maker Sherwin-Williams, which operated on the sites, is dredging Kirkwood Lake, removing contaminated and uncontaminated soil. Sherwin-Williams would reimburse the county for operations involving the contaminated soil, and the county and company would split overhead costs. A spokesman for Sherwin-Williams acknowledged receipt of a proposal from the county.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey appeals court has upheld Gov. Christie's appointment of a Hispanic civil rights activist to the Rutgers University board of governors, ruling against the state's top elected Democrat. Martín Perez's December 2012 appointment to Rutgers' main governing body, which took effect last July, "was a proper exercise" of Christie's authority, three judges ruled Tuesday. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) had sought to block Perez's appointment. He said Tuesday he would accept the decision, though he did not agree with it. "I'm glad it's over and so I will continue serving my state and my university," Perez, 65, said by phone Tuesday.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faye Corman was leading the little boy with the deep brown eyes across the train platform when all of a sudden he stopped, planted his feet, and refused to move. "Come on, Jon Paul," she urged him. No luck. She and her husband had adopted the 3-year-old from China a few months before, and communication was still tricky. There was the language barrier, sure, but also the boy was blind - and always had been, as far as anyone knew. He'd just had a second surgery at Wills Eye Hospital, but the doctors did not hold out much hope that he would see. Suddenly, Jon Paul leaned forward, almost as though he were looking at something - looking?
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In Bellmawr, the "Direct Connection" project has upset mourners at New St. Mary's Cemetery, released dust clouds onto Little League fields on Essex Avenue, and worried residents of a dozen doomed homes in the Bellmawr Park neighborhood. "Bellmawr people are putting up with a lot," says Frank Filipek, longtime mayor of the blue-collar borough of 11,500, citing construction-damaged water mains, frequently muddy roads, and added traffic congestion. The state's $900 million effort to reconstruct the complicated confluence of Interstates 295 and 76 and Route 42 in Camden County broke ground in March 2013 and will not be finished until 2021.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jason Allen would like to spend the summer reaching out to the community, organizing exhibits, tours, and special programs that tell the history of Camden County. But lately, the executive director of the Camden County Historical Society has been dealing more pressing needs: rehabbing the organization's deteriorating building complex in Camden. A new roof is desperately needed for Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house, and that site, along with the adjacent Camden County Museum, is awaiting about $150,000 in repairs to fix water damage caused by leaking pipes.
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