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Camden County

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NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Within a two-block stretch of Sheridan Street in Camden, 13 homes have boarded-up windows and bright-orange Department of Public Works stickers marking them for a demolition day that has yet to come. "I face four of them," said Valerie Roberts, 26, who grew up in the neighborhood and now lives on the 1200 block. "I would love to see them come down. They've been like that 15, 20 years, though. " For decades, Camden's 77,250 residents have lived among vacant dwellings, which drive down property values, harbor crime, and create upkeep nightmares for residents whose homes are attached to crumbling structures.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years Camden City, under a state law, has provided sample ballots in Spanish because of its high concentration of residents who list Spanish as their primary language - more than 10 percent of its registered voters. But now the U.S. Department of Justice is mandating that every municipality in Camden County provide actual ballots, not just samples, and all election material in both English and Spanish. Under the federal Voting Rights Act, a mandate for bilingual ballots in a county is triggered when: At least 10,000, or 5 percent of the voting-age citizens of the county speak a language other than English at home and speak English less than "very well.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of the eight counties in the Philadelphia region, only Camden County lost population between April 2010 and July 2013, Census Bureau population estimates released Thursday show. Much of the county's 0.2 percent population loss represented residential fall-offs in the city of Camden (0.6 percent), Gloucester Township (0.5 percent), and Winslow (0.8 percent), census numbers showed. But there were notable exceptions on the New Jersey side of the Delaware, based on the Census Bureau's 2013 population estimates for the region's 340 municipalities.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state tournament was a showcase for Camden County schools, which won three of the six South Jersey boys' basketball crowns. The titlists were Highland in Group 4, Camden (Group 3), and Haddonfield (Group 2). The other South Jersey champions were Parochial A's Christian Brothers Academy of Monmouth County, Parochial B St. Augustine (Atlantic County), and Group 1 Florence (Burlington County). Thanks to Florence, Burlington County has the longest current streak of sectional champions.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | Associated Press
Camden County officials are outraged over a court program that rewards juvenile offenders with gifts such as computers and iPods for completing their probation, according to the Courier-Post of Cherry Hill. Freeholders issued a news release this week demanding the state courts end the program, which is offered only in Camden County. The statement described the program as a "disgraceful expenditure of taxpayers' funds" that sends the wrong message. The freeholders said many other children are working hard in school to get good grades or to find jobs to help their families and cannot afford iPods, notebook computers, and similar items.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By James Osborne, Darran Simon, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Efforts to create a Camden County regionalized police force will, for now, focus on specialized services such as a central detective bureau and SWAT team, officials said Thursday. A countywide force remains the goal, said Board of Freeholders spokeswoman Joyce Gabriel, but a combined detectives and K-9 unit may happen "before anything else. " The move, discussed at a closed-door meeting of county, municipal, and law enforcement officials Tuesday, was read by some as stepping back from plans to disband municipal police forces.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed $1.6 billion light-rail line between Glassboro and Camden has hit a significant roadblock: The Federal Transit Administration will not proceed with a required environmental study because the planned rail line has no owner or operator. Without a completed environmental study, the 18-mile line cannot be built. "Unfortunately, because you have not identified a project sponsor who can accept the responsibility for commitments in the environmental impact statement, and ultimately operate and construct the project, we cannot move ahead with the environmental document," the FTA's regional administrator in Philadelphia, Brigid Hynes-Cherin, wrote to John Hanson, chief executive of the Delaware River Port Authority.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert D. Melson has resigned as Camden County's public safety director after three months on the job, Freeholder Annette Castiglione-Degan announced yesterday. In his resignation letter, dated May 5, Melson said that he plans to return to his rank as captain in the Cherry Hill Police Department. Melson had spent 26 years in the Cherry Hill department before accepting the $65,000-a-year position as county public safety director on Feb. 23. Melson, whose last day as director will be May 19, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horse-racing enthusiasts in Camden County have had two choices when gambling in person: Drive an hour to the nearest offtrack betting facility in New Jersey, or across the Delaware River to one in Philadelphia. Now, Camden County gamblers can bet on a shorter commute. Favorites, the state's fifth offtrack betting facility, opened Tuesday in Clementon. Penn National Gaming Inc., which is managing it, hopes the new site will draw South Jersey gamblers and, ultimately, compete with the betting parlors in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer / ELIZABETH VORHAUER
A three-alarm fire yesterday adamaged the Oaklyn Garden Apartments in Oaklyn, Camden County. No injuries were reported as a result of the blaze in the two-story, two-building, 20-unit complex at Newton and Oakland Avenues. The cause of the fire was under investigation.
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NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the value of a high school education? Recent U.S. Census data says it's worth at least $10,386 - the difference between the average income of high school graduates and the income earned by dropouts. Seeking to help county residents earn high school diplomas - and potentially more money - the Camden County Library System has enlisted in a New Jersey State Library-aided program that offers a second chance to dropouts. The Career Online High School (COHS) program, which has brought a slew of new laptops to the county library system, can accommodate up to 35 county library card holders who are at least 19 years and have completed their freshman year of high school before dropping out. First to enroll in the program was Nancy Torres, 29, of Camden.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Republican Camden County freeholder candidates Kimone Smith and Teddy Liddell are running a shoestring, shoe-leather campaign. They're knocking on doors and shaking hands in hopes of serving on a board that has been GOP-free for 21 years - in a county government where the last elected Republican left office in 1996. And they're campaigning in a county of 228 square miles and half a million people where their party is locally competitive in just a handful of municipalities. "Yes, you can call me something of an idealist," Smith, 25, a fitness trainer who lives in Camden's Parkside section, says with a smile.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Within a two-block stretch of Sheridan Street in Camden, 13 homes have boarded-up windows and bright-orange Department of Public Works stickers marking them for a demolition day that has yet to come. "I face four of them," said Valerie Roberts, 26, who grew up in the neighborhood and now lives on the 1200 block. "I would love to see them come down. They've been like that 15, 20 years, though. " For decades, Camden's 77,250 residents have lived among vacant dwellings, which drive down property values, harbor crime, and create upkeep nightmares for residents whose homes are attached to crumbling structures.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
Campbell Soup Co. took a step forward Thursday in a long-awaited plan to create a 13-acre office park around its Camden headquarters, appointing Brandywine Realty Trust as developer. The parcels of land, located off Newton Avenue between Admiral Wilson Boulevard and 11th Street, will become an office park for prospective users, who could benefit from amped-up tax incentives created through recent state legislation. When Campbell's committed to staying in Camden in 2007, it also announced plans to invest in the "Gateway District" by redeveloping the area around its headquarters.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice Fish Lick, 93, a volunteer at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden in the 1990s, died Sunday, Oct. 5, at the retirement community Cadbury at Cherry Hill. Mrs. Lick lived in West Collingswood from the late 1940s to the late 1970s and for the last seven years in Haddonfield, a son, John, said. Born in Camden, Mrs. Lick graduated in 1939 from what is now Gloucester Catholic High School in Gloucester City and, after marrying, "was a stay-at-home mother," her son said.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a New Jersey congressional district dominated by Democrats since the Bicentennial, Republican Garry Cobb is stressing one point over and over: He's not Donald Norcross. The former Eagles player's push against the status quo was the overarching theme in the First District candidates' joint interview Wednesday with the Inquirer Editorial Board. Norcross, a Democratic state senator from Camden County, touted a lengthy record and said he, not a political machine, claims sole ownership of it. "Clearly, he's a product of the machine.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed $1.6 billion light-rail line between Glassboro and Camden has hit a significant roadblock: The Federal Transit Administration will not proceed with a required environmental study because the planned rail line has no owner or operator. Without a completed environmental study, the 18-mile line cannot be built. "Unfortunately, because you have not identified a project sponsor who can accept the responsibility for commitments in the environmental impact statement, and ultimately operate and construct the project, we cannot move ahead with the environmental document," the FTA's regional administrator in Philadelphia, Brigid Hynes-Cherin, wrote to John Hanson, chief executive of the Delaware River Port Authority.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's downtown streets could get a makeover, under a new study announced Friday by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. As part of $1 million in grants in four South Jersey counties, Camden will get $60,000 to study the feasibility of converting Market, Federal and Fifth streets from one-way to two-way traffic. The study also will "review traffic efficiency and orientation of these major corridors, pedestrian and bicycle safety, and effect of traffic direction on business visibility and accessibility.
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal for Camden County to acquire most of the Bancroft campus in Haddonfield and preserve it as open space appears to be losing ground. The county committee that advises the freeholders on what open-space projects to pursue voted last week to make a 425-acre tract of the Winslow Farms Conservancy its top priority out of three sites proposed for acquisition, according to committee interim chairman Jack Sworaski. An actual recommendation to the freeholders, if made, would come later.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Claiming that the company managing Camden County College's facilities maintenance and custodial care has failed to do its job, representatives from the faculty and staff union asked the county freeholders Thursday to rehire employees who were laid off. "The place is filthy, there are so many bad things that are going to happen," said Dawn Gaff Merlino, who was laid off from her custodial job. The first speaker during the public-comment session of...
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