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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
SHE SPED OFF into the darkness more than three years ago from the home of a Philadelphia 76er, drunk, angry and alone, and only those closest to Toni Lee Sharpless believe she'll ever be seen again. But a recently mailed anonymous letter could provide ominous clues to the Chester County woman's disappearance - or turn out to be a cruel hoax. "What happened to [Toni], I don't really know. All I know is she had a run-in with the police and I was paid much-needed cash to get the car to a shop in Boston," the author wrote on a piece of yellow legal paper.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years Camden City, under a state law, has provided sample ballots in Spanish because of its high concentration of residents who list Spanish as their primary language - more than 10 percent of its registered voters. But now the U.S. Department of Justice is mandating that every municipality in Camden County provide actual ballots, not just samples, and all election material in both English and Spanish. Under the federal Voting Rights Act, a mandate for bilingual ballots in a county is triggered when: At least 10,000, or 5 percent of the voting-age citizens of the county speak a language other than English at home and speak English less than "very well.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of the eight counties in the Philadelphia region, only Camden County lost population between April 2010 and July 2013, Census Bureau population estimates released Thursday show. Much of the county's 0.2 percent population loss represented residential fall-offs in the city of Camden (0.6 percent), Gloucester Township (0.5 percent), and Winslow (0.8 percent), census numbers showed. But there were notable exceptions on the New Jersey side of the Delaware, based on the Census Bureau's 2013 population estimates for the region's 340 municipalities.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state tournament was a showcase for Camden County schools, which won three of the six South Jersey boys' basketball crowns. The titlists were Highland in Group 4, Camden (Group 3), and Haddonfield (Group 2). The other South Jersey champions were Parochial A's Christian Brothers Academy of Monmouth County, Parochial B St. Augustine (Atlantic County), and Group 1 Florence (Burlington County). Thanks to Florence, Burlington County has the longest current streak of sectional champions.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | Associated Press
Camden County officials are outraged over a court program that rewards juvenile offenders with gifts such as computers and iPods for completing their probation, according to the Courier-Post of Cherry Hill. Freeholders issued a news release this week demanding the state courts end the program, which is offered only in Camden County. The statement described the program as a "disgraceful expenditure of taxpayers' funds" that sends the wrong message. The freeholders said many other children are working hard in school to get good grades or to find jobs to help their families and cannot afford iPods, notebook computers, and similar items.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By James Osborne, Darran Simon, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Efforts to create a Camden County regionalized police force will, for now, focus on specialized services such as a central detective bureau and SWAT team, officials said Thursday. A countywide force remains the goal, said Board of Freeholders spokeswoman Joyce Gabriel, but a combined detectives and K-9 unit may happen "before anything else. " The move, discussed at a closed-door meeting of county, municipal, and law enforcement officials Tuesday, was read by some as stepping back from plans to disband municipal police forces.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert D. Melson has resigned as Camden County's public safety director after three months on the job, Freeholder Annette Castiglione-Degan announced yesterday. In his resignation letter, dated May 5, Melson said that he plans to return to his rank as captain in the Cherry Hill Police Department. Melson had spent 26 years in the Cherry Hill department before accepting the $65,000-a-year position as county public safety director on Feb. 23. Melson, whose last day as director will be May 19, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer / ELIZABETH VORHAUER
A three-alarm fire yesterday adamaged the Oaklyn Garden Apartments in Oaklyn, Camden County. No injuries were reported as a result of the blaze in the two-story, two-building, 20-unit complex at Newton and Oakland Avenues. The cause of the fire was under investigation.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
A 15-year-old boy was found shot multiple times Friday night in Camden County, officials said. The teenager was found in a wooded area near the 2400 block of Mount Ephraim Avenue in Woodlynne about 10:15 p.m., county officials said. An officer on patrol heard him calling for help, said Jason Laughlin, spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. The teen, whose name was withheld, was listed in critical and unstable condition at Cooper University Hospital. No arrests had been made.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
A 44-year-old man was arrested after he allegedly exposed himself in public and masturbated in front of a woman and her 15-year-old daughter Thursday afternoon in Camden County, police said. Gloucester Township police responded at 2:18 p.m. to a report of a man taking his clothes off on Oak Avenue. The officers arrested John Boyle Jr., who police said masturbated in front of the mother and daughter as they were getting into a car. A young boy also saw the incident, police said. Boyle, of Black Horse Pike in the township's Hilltop section, was charged with fourth-degree lewdness and was being held in the Camden County Correctional Facility with bail set at $2,500.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Assemblyman John J. Burzichelli (D., Gloucester) had a choice to make. He could stay in the Assembly, where he has served for 13 years, or he could take a $100,000-a-year job as head of the Gloucester County Improvement Authority. Burzichelli chose to do both. Amazingly, that's legal in New Jersey. Why? Because he and the rest of the state's 120 legislators get to make the rules, and the rules say they can, under certain circumstances, collect more than one government paycheck. Such double dipping may be legal, but it's also "very, very much unethical," according to former State Sen. Bill Schluter, vice chairman of the state Ethics Commission.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Freeholder Ian K. Leonard will not seek a third term this year, he said Friday, citing his growing responsibilities as political director for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Leonard, 37, has been on the board since 2009, when he became the state's youngest elected freeholder. "Serving as a Camden County freeholder has been one of my greatest achievements, and I'm enormously appreciative of the support I've received from the people of Camden County in my two prior runs," Leonard said in a statement.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of Camden dispatchers who handle emergency calls to county police fear an evaluation of the unit could put them out of work. City Council this week authorized a request for proposals to determine whether if Camden could provide better service for less money using a contractor. City spokesman Vincent Basara said that the city is simply seeking to review the cost efficiency of the unit, and that any future action would go before Council for discussion. But the president of Communications Workers of America Local 1014, representing the dispatchers, said members worry that the city is looking to phase them out. "They need experienced, professional dispatchers, and that is who our members are," Karl Walko said Wednesday.
SPORTS
February 11, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bishop Eustace Prep, which won back-to-back state titles in 2008 and 2009, is planning to drop wrestling as a varsity sport at the end of this season, veteran coach Vince Angelucci confirmed Monday. "I'm heartbroken," Angelucci said. Angelucci told wrestlers and parents after Friday night's match against Triton that the school administration has decided to cancel the program after this season. "I'm disappointed that the school would bail on it," Angelucci said. "Wrestling teaches hard work, dedication, commitment - things you need to be successful in life.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The "Romance Room" will be empty soon. So will the shelves stacked with sci-fi, westerns, biographies, and mysteries. And when the books are gone, a piece of local history will disappear as well: After 30 years on Haddon Avenue in Collingswood, the Book Trader is closing. "It's time," owner Mary Alice Curley says. "I'm done. " A mother of six, grandmother of 14, and great-grandmother of two, Curley was 52 when she got into the used-book business. She's 82 now; age, as well as rising rent and dwindling patronage, inspired her decision to shutter the store by the end of February.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A position in the Camden County Jail that has faced high turnover will be filled on an interim level this month, making that person who fills it the sixth jail population manager since 2011. The move comes amid a vacancy in the position and a letter from U.S. District Judge Jerome Simandle, who told county officials on Jan. 26 that he was "very concerned" about the turnover. The jail population manager focuses on how inmates are processed, from arrest to court date, and makes recommendations on how to improve their movement in the system.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Superior Court judge in Camden instructed William A. Clark III to not speak about his murder case, but Clark stood up anyway. "I've got something to say," Clark, 50, a man with dirty blond hair, a thick beard, and tattoos of wings on his arms, told Judge Edward J. McBride Jr. Then he gave his two cents about his roommate, Steven Johnston, 52, whom he admitted fatally shooting in the head Saturday: "He's a child molester, your honor. " Clark's outburst Monday - while true - drew another admonition from McBride to stop talking.
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County homeowners, gardeners, and fix-it-yourself types will soon have a new money-saving resource. This summer, county officials hope to launch a tool library in Gloucester Township that can help residents work on home projects without having to buy special equipment. The program will be similar to the West Philly Tool Library, which Camden County Freeholder Michelle Gentek visited last year, along with Chris Waldron, county director of sustainability and shared services. "In the short time we were there, about 20 people came through the door," Gentek said.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the grass needed cutting and money was running out, he brought in his lawn mower and took care of the grounds himself. When funds were unavailable for salaries, he didn't take a paycheck, so he could pay his small staff. And when the heat failed last winter and leaks sprouted from water pipes, he fought for quick repairs - a frustrating process still underway. Clearly, Jason Allen had his share of challenges as the first African American executive director of the Camden County Historical Society.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Burlington County, four people were living in a pop-up trailer with no heat, one woman lost her home through a divorce, and another woman got kicked out of the house where she was living with her boyfriend. These stories, and many others, were told to advocates for the homeless since early Wednesday, as volunteers in seven out of 21 of New Jersey's counties visited shelters, wooded encampments, and the streets to conduct the annual "Point in Time" survey. The survey every January tries to count how many homeless live in each county.
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