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Camden Yards

NEWS
October 7, 1991 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The ballpark had been a very good neighbor. And as Orioles fans trudged a final time yesterday to cars parked by the restored Victorian mansions of Waverly, or crept in traffic past the terraced front yards of Ednor Gardens, or stepped lively toward a favorite bar or Asian restaurant along Greenmount Avenue, the residents were sad to see them go, and fearful of what comes next. Memorial Stadium wasn't the oldest, or coziest, or most idiosyncratic of major league parks when it hosted its final Orioles game yesterday.
NEWS
June 2, 1999
Stadium may not spur growth in Center City Before any of our local politicians decide to commit city funds to a baseball-only stadium at the corner of Broad and Spring Garden Streets, please consider the following information: James Quirk and Rodney Font, in their book Hard Ball: The Abuse of Power in Pro Team Sports, state that "most of the so-called success stories are stories of stadiums being located in areas that were already experiencing economic...
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation is witnessing a boom - or is it a boondoggle? - of unprecedented proportions in modern sports as city after city, state after state, has stepped forward to provide billions of dollars to build new sporting facilities for teams. It's all a matter of perspective. Critics point out that this all redounds to the benefit of teams controlled by billionaire owners and made up of millionaire players. Supporters say the new stadiums spruce up civic images and attract well-heeled, free-spending fans.
NEWS
March 2, 2010 | By Darran Simon INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a Sunday afternoon just over a week ago, Muriah Ashley Huff bumped into two friends on the platform of NJ Transit's River Line station in Palmyra. Huff, 18, longed to get her driving permit, and was bound for Camden to see her boyfriend, Mike, recalled Nicole Bass and Vivian Richardson. That was the last the two saw of the bubbly cosmetology student. Four days later, on Thursday, Huff's beaten and strangled body was found buried in the backyard of a South Camden home, said the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
SPORTS
January 10, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the International Sport Summit 2003 announced four category winners in its "50 That Shaped the Last 25," list for the most significant impact on sports during the past 25 years. Michael Jordan was selected as the most influential athlete endorser. Roone Arledge, who developed "Monday Night Football" and "Wide World of Sports" for ABC, was selected as the top media executive. The Indiana Sports Corporation was voted the top sports commission and Camden Yards in Baltimore was picked as the top venue.
SPORTS
June 19, 1991 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
The pieces are beginning to fall into place. The steel skeleton is up, the inner concrete shell has been poured and the exterior brickwork has begun. Construction crews have excavated the field itself, a special sod is being cultivated on a farm on Maryland's eastern shore and the higher-ups are considering possible names: Should the new ballpark in Baltimore be called Oriole Park, Camden Yards or something entirely different? Located on the site of the old B & O rail station at the edge of downtown, the still-unnamed facility will be unveiled on Opening Day 1992 and will hark back in design to the old-fashioned ballparks of the '40s and before.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a nondescript concrete building tucked away in a Camden scrap yard, behind the piles of twisted metal and the bales of mashed aluminum, the noise of shattering glass is like a perpetual barroom brawl. This gritty industrial corner of Camden hardly seems the appropriate location for a revolutionary change in waste management. But that is how Camden County officials describe what is happening in this building, the county's new center for processing recyclable materials. "It's not very glamorous," said Terry Dennen, the county's recycling coordinator.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Mike Shoup FOR THE INQUIRER
I was convinced that the two grandkids would be absolutely wowed by Baltimore's National Aquarium, the city's signature tourist attraction for almost 20 years and reason enough for a visit here. But we couldn't pry 4-year-old Caroline from Port Discovery, a new children's museum, where she was totally taken by the colorings, cuttings and pastings in what she called the "hearts and crafts" room. And Michael, 10, wants to return just to revisit the Torsk, a World War II submarine, and its neighboring harborside attraction, the Civil War-era USS Constellation (or, as he called it, the USS Constipation)
SPORTS
July 14, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mayor of Philadelphia went to a baseball game in Baltimore last night. But Ed Rendell didn't show up at the 64th All-Star Game merely because he's a baseball fan. He also showed up because he's a fan of what Baltimore's awe- inspiring ballpark at Camden Yards has done to electrify the entire city - particularly this week. And as he sat in the upper deck, he said his dream of duplicating the success of Camden Yards in his own city is closer than many people think. "I think we'll see a new ballpark in Philadelphia in this century - and this century doesn't have a long way to go," he said.
SPORTS
August 5, 1993 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The image on the mound is familiar, but the colors are all wrong. It's a lefthanded pitcher with this oddly pudgy frame, round, tawny face, and fierce, trancelike concentration. His eyes roll up in his head as he pivots from his windup to launch the ball toward home plate. Despite the black and orange uniform, there's no mistaking Fernando Valenzuela. Two years after the Los Angeles Dodgers closed out an era by releasing their hurler of the '80s, two years after quietly fading out of baseball in the depths of the California Angels' farm system, the Mexican sensation is back . . . as an Oriole.
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