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NEWS
September 17, 2014
ISSUE | SMOKING Expand N.J. ban Congratulations to CVS for its decision to stop selling tobacco products. And shame, shame on Gov. Christie for his recent veto of a smoking ban in public parks and beaches, especially after New Jersey lawmakers approved the bill. His disregard for our representatives in Trenton and the health and future of New Jerseyans should be remembered. |Mary T Gramkowski, Haddonfield ISSUE | CONCERTS Share those vibes Sarcasm aside, it's a great suggestion from a recent letter writer that Made in America concerts take place in a different neighborhood.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in the background, Holtec International's chief executive, Krishna P. Singh, in July faced the news media, Gov. Christie at his side, and talked about plans to build a $260 million factory on Camden's waterfront, bringing, eventually, 3,000 jobs to the impoverished city. Maybe, someday, Camden would be the place where newly designed small nuclear reactors would revitalize the nuclear power industry. "We look at this as our social responsibility," Singh, 67, told reporters as officials described how New Jersey would provide $260 million in tax incentives and Singh would guarantee 400 jobs.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
  The blogger Brian K. Everett posted this image of himself documenting open sidewalks at Radio Lofts in Camden, nearly two weeks after a city inspection concluded the site should be fenced off to protect public safety. Four weeks after the Camden blogger questioned the stability of a vacant downtown building - and a day after he posted two-week-old municipal inspection documents urging immediate action - the city is finally moving to secure the structure. "If sounding a little alarmist is what it took to make sure people aren't killed by falling objects, so be it," said Everett, whose NJ Poverty Reality blog suggested the Cooper Street landmark may be in danger of collapse, or could be demolished.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s and 1980s, Samuel W. Madara and his wife, Connie, traveled overseas several times to share ideas about insurance "with a broad group of insurance people," she said. They and others in their group were not simply Americans bringing their methods to other cultures, she said, but were also learning in seminars from foreign insurers. "It was an exchange of ideas peculiar in China" at the time, she said in a phone interview, because in the days before private enterprise, "they were all government workers.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newly elected head of the National Education Association - the largest professional employee union in the country - visited Camden on Friday, and criticized standardized testing and the financial drain charter schools can put on traditional public schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia was elected Sept. 1 to head the union, which represents 3.2 million members nationally. She is a former Utah teacher of the year, the first Latina to hold the post, and the first woman elected in 25 years. Garcia came to Camden's Pyne Poynt Middle School at the suggestion of New Jersey Education Association president Wendell Steinhauer.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Thursday asked the Legislature to beef up tax incentives for non-gambling projects in Atlantic City as part of an economic development bill. He conditionally vetoed the bill, passed by the Democratic-controlled Legislature in June, which would revise the state's economic incentive programs. Under Christie's revisions, non-gambling businesses in Atlantic City would be eligible for many of the same incentives as those in other poor cities, such as Camden. "Similar to Camden and other targeted cities in New Jersey that are in need of economic rejuvenation, I am recommending that non-gaming development projects and private-sector job growth in Atlantic City be eligible for the strongest possible incentives," Christie wrote in his conditional veto message.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Luis Soto drops his son and daughter off at Pyne Poynt Middle School, 13-year-old Christopher goes through the front door dressed in a red polo shirt and Alianna, 10, walks through the side door to greet other students in Mastery blue. "They both seem to come home happy," Soto said two weeks into classes while waiting for them outside before dismissal. Mastery Charter Schools' newly opened North Camden Elementary School, a district-charter hybrid known as a "Renaissance" school, is renting space inside Pyne Poynt Middle this year.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
TEARS WILL BE shed Sunday night along the Atlantic City Boardwalk when one lucky lady is crowned Miss America. For Miss Delaware's family, win or lose, tears will flow - joyous tears for Brittany Lewis beaming up on the stage, and tears for her sister Gina Clarke-Lewis, who was slain in Camden County in 2010. "She's keeping Gina's memory alive just by being up there," Brenda Lewis said of her daughter. Brittany Lewis, 24, is about as close as it gets to a hometown favorite, having grown up a few miles away, across the inlet in Brigantine.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Gov. Christie visited her first-grade classroom, Mary Stahl told the 6- and 7-year-olds how special the coming moment would be. "Someday, you'll remember this day, the day the governor came to your classroom," she told the eager children, who paused their counting lesson to greet Christie. If recent history is any indication, Christie may return sooner than they think. He visited Octavius V. Catto Family School earlier this year and returned Tuesday to celebrate back-to-school, and, more broadly, to juxtapose Camden's "cooperative spirit" with the situation in Newark, where students boycotted the first day of school in a city far more politically divided over changes to the school system.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff
CAMDEN City officials announced the creation of a "pop-up park" outside City Hall where lawn chairs, picnic tables, light installations, and a piano will remain available to the public through December. The building and installation of the new amenities in Roosevelt Park cost $30,000 and were funded by the William Penn Foundation and created by Cooper's Ferry Partnership in conjunction with local design firms. On Monday as Mayor Dana Redd and other city officials gathered in a tent to formally introduce the park, a half dozen people sat in the blue lawnchairs, chatting with friends or dozing on the breezy day: The park has been open for two weeks and many residents already had discovered it. "This is part of a growing movement to revitalize by investing in public space," said Anthony Perno, CEO of Cooper's Ferry Partnership.
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