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NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the early 1970s, George M. Richardson II helped authorize a study of the Willingboro Fire Department by the National Fire Protection Association. A firefighter when he was only 16, Mr. Richardson had become the first Willingboro fire commissioner and the first chairman of the Willingboro Board of Fire Commissioners. The NFPA study of comparable departments across the nation was meant to determine whether the volunteer department "should have been partially paid, if not fully paid," said David Andrade, former township fire chief and chairman of the commissioners.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Camden's Yum-Yum summers lasted from the mid-1930s until the late '80s. But fondness for the distinctive, locally made frozen treat - with its unusual "split" flavors and creamy texture - endures among folks who grew up in the city. "In the early '70s in Fairview, kids with a wagon sold Yum-Yum from a steel container with ice all around it," recalls Paul Christman, 54, a retail clerk who lives in Runnemede. "We'd be playing outside at Westfield Acres and hear the boy with the wagon yelling, 'Yum-Yum, Yum-Yum,' " says Audubon resident Lori Jean Nourse, 55, a painter.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsauken printing and packaging firm will receive $34 million in tax credits to relocate to and expand in neighboring Camden. Approved Friday morning, the deal for Contemporary Graphic Solutions is another by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority to help bring economic activity to the city. The company plans to also spend about $7.5 million in capital investment and add 56 full-time positions to its current staff of 170, according to a project summary with the agency.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
Camden, ranked for long among the most violence-plagued cities in the country, is now a "national model" of policing, the city's mayor said Thursday as President Obama announced that he will visit next week to see for himself. The work of a county-run police force that took over patrolling in Camden two years ago has been hailed from City Hall to the governor's mansion. Gov. Christie and local officials have highlighted drops in various crime categories, including homicides, since the advent of the new force, attributing the progress to having more officers on the beat, new crime-fighting technologies, and greater community outreach.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret Rittmayer Rieck, 80, of Burlington City, a former organist for Catholic and Lutheran churches in Camden, died of dementia on Thursday, May 7, at Burlington Woods, an assisted living facility. Born in Camden, Mrs. Rieck graduated from Camden Catholic High School in 1952 and earned a bachelor's degree in 1956 at the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, now part of the University of the Arts. Mrs. Rieck ran her own music studio in Paulsboro in the late 1950s, offering voice and piano lessons, her daughter, Noreen Nixon, said.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden teachers on Tuesday decried the school district's latest round of layoffs, saying the city's students will suffer from the loss of more educators in schools that already are stretched thin. "I just don't understand how we are going to meet the needs of our student population," said Karen Borrelli Luke, a health and physical education teacher who is not facing a layoff. She was among those at the advisory school board's meeting Tuesday in East Camden who spoke to the board. "These layoffs impact all of us. " The state-run district is laying off 31 teachers, 46 student services staffers, and 12 members of the central office staff for budgetary reasons.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden City School District is laying off 31 teachers and 46 student services staffers because of budget cuts and declining enrollment, officials said Monday. District officials, who informed affected employees Monday and are expected to announce the layoffs at the advisory school board's meeting Tuesday, also will cut 15 staff from the central office, which over the last two years has lost about half its positions. The numbers are smaller than those Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard had offered as estimates during a hearing last month, when he cautioned that 150 to 350 layoffs might be necessary to make the $49 million in cuts needed to balance the budget.
NEWS
May 11, 2015
Curled up on a couch backstage before a show at the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas, in March, Michael Angelakos could hardly appear to be more relaxed. Relaxation wasn't quite the case, however. "I've never actually been more stressed - and happier," said the singer, songwriter, and instrumentalist leader of Passion Pit, gearing up for a tour in support of its third album, Kindred , on Columbia Records. "I don't know why," Angelakos said. "I think that's the way I like it, when I'm doing what I love, which is essentially making things all the time, which is what I'm hired to do and what I love to do. And also problem-solving, fixing things, getting things accomplished.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Police Department, which for two years has patrolled only the city of Camden, hopes to begin justifying its broader ambition by wooing a second town into its fold - Pennsauken Township. County officials are expected to submit a detailed proposal this month to Pennsauken that would spell out how a county-run department would function in place of the township's current force, The Inquirer has learned. Pennsauken Public Safety Director John Kneib stressed in an interview that the report would be just an early look at the idea, and that any final decision - which he said would require the support of residents and township police officers - was far off. "It's got to blow us away," he said of the county's expected pitch.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Homeland Security agents took Kiyonna Napier's husband, Fidel, into custody this week, her days have been consumed by scrambling to make sure the couple's three children get to school in the mornings - a responsibility her husband always handled. At night, Fidel Napier calls from Newark, N.J., where he is being held as federal authorities prepare to deport him to Jamaica, and talks briefly with her and their children. "I just keep praying, keep hoping something will change," Kiyonna Napier said Friday from her Pennsauken home.
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