FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Arthur and Guinevere will not reign in this Camelot - Robert Arthur will. The Tredyffrin Board of Supervisors approved Arthur's plan to subdivide the property known as Camelot at North Wayne Avenue and Crestline Road. Camelot, a 12-acre estate, has a main house with a detached garage. The subdivision plan would allow for four additional homes to be built at the site. According to township officials, Arthur has no immediate plans to develop the property. As a condition of the approval, the land was deed-restricted to prevent further subdivisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The name Forrest J. Willingham evokes a certain ring of majesty for a producer and director of musical theater, even if his namesake wasn't the noble Edwin Forrest but the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest - and even if his troupe, the Songs of Broadway Company, is as indigenous to that street of dreams as a truck-and-bus company doing business in South Florida. Which is literally what it is. After 17 seasons of playing condo social halls, hotel ballrooms, country clubs, amusement parks and civic auditoriums from Fort Lauderdale to Apalachicola, Willingham has decided to "spread our wings a little" by bringing the Lerner-Loewe Arthurian opus "Camelot" to the Walnut Street Theatre for three weeks.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
Plans for a geriatric personal-care facility on the Camelot estate in Wayne have collapsed after developer Dean Roach and the seller failed to extend their agreement of sale. Lou Colagreco, Roach's attorney, said an application to the Tredyffrin Zoning Hearing Board has been withdrawn for the 55 personal care units and 10- bed infirmary at North Wayne Avenue and Crestline Road. "We were unable to come to mutually agreeable terms for continuing the sale" when the previous agreement of sale expired in mid-May, Colagreco said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For one brief, shining moment at the end of the evening, I felt a tear in my eye - and that is all I need tell you about the Camelot that opened on Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theatre. Not in my most fanciful imaginings could I have anticipated being touched by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe's creaky retelling of the Arthurian legend. Camelot has always been the most pachydermal of musicals, a lumbering narrative with a gorgeous score cavalierly pasted onto it. And while Charles Abbott's Walnut production trims the book here and there, it still runs nearly three hours, a fact of which you are not unaware.
LIVING
October 17, 1995 | By Ann Conway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one exquisite moment, Jackie Kennedy became the epitome of glamour and elegance - the uncrowned queen of America. - Oleg Cassini Oleg Cassini stands in awe of the woman who inspired his new book, A Thousand Days of Magic: Dressing Jacqueline Kennedy for the White House. "I wanted to create a book that was a true recognition of what she had accomplished in creating Camelot," he said recently by phone from New York. Cassini designed more than 300 silhouettes for Jacqueline Kennedy during the 1,000 days of the Kennedy administration.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Media Theatre closes its season with a production of Camelot that has strong voices doing justice to its high-quality songs and well-acted characters putting color and life into this warhorse's rather plodding plot. When Camelot debuted just after the election of President John F. Kennedy in 1960, the musical - about Britain's mythical King Arthur and his idealistic vision of a peaceful and justly ruled kingdom - was adopted by Kennedy supporters as an allegory of what the idealistic new president would achieve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Robert Goulet was in such high spirits last night at the Valley Forge Music Fair that as he pounded up the darkened ramp following his Act 1 exit, sharp- eared aisle-sitters clearly heard him warbling, semi-sotto voce, "Off we go, into the wild blue yonder . . . " The Army Air Corps Song definitely is not in the score of "Camelot," but the star's gentle high jinks were in keeping with the rest of the production, which is light, bright and roundly...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Superb music, weak book. That's the capsule opinion of Camelot that has prevailed since its Broadway debut in 1960. However, the current revival at the Merriam Theater is liable to leave the impression that the score is not really as great as everyone seems to think, and that the libretto is even worse. This touring production again stars Robert Goulet as King Arthur in Lerner and Loewe's musical adaptation of T.H. White's book The Once and Future King. Goulet has been leading periodic revisits to Camelot for the last decade, but if the flat, uninvolving presentation of Tuesday's opening night is the best he and his fellow performers can muster, let's hope this is his last time around the moat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The enduring popularity of Camelot, the 1960 musical that became the final collaboration of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, is one of the theater's darker mysteries. For reasons that remain unclear, many people once adopted the show as a kind of metaphor for the Kennedy administration. But that Camelot is long gone, its crown jewels tarnished by the glare of time. There must be another reason why this wreck of a musical about the Arthurian legend, occupying the Forrest Theatre through Feb. 7, lures patrons the way a joust lures the incurably morbid.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The never-flagging popularity of Camelot has allowed Robert Goulet to age along with the Broadway musical. In the Broadway premiere, he got his big show-business break as the dashing, young Sir Lancelot. Now, 32 years later, as an older, wiser King Arthur, one of his tasks is to rein in the impetuous, energetic Knight of the Roundtable he used to portray. This is not Goulet's first time as the legendary monarch. As did Richard Harris before him, Goulet seems to be making a mini-career of the part.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
For those of a certain age, the images are forever swathed in the glittering mists of memory: A virile John F. Kennedy stands on a bunting-bedecked stage the day after his 1960 election to the presidency; the smiling, stylish, and very pregnant Jackie Kennedy stands next to him. Jackie, before an easel, chats happily with her little girl, Caroline. Jackie leans over Jack, who is seated in a thronelike wicker chair; infant Caroline, on his lap, is helping herself to a mouthful of mommy's pearls.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two more Renaissance schools enrolling up to 700 students will open in the fall in addition to the one previously approved, the Camden School District said Friday. Mastery and Uncommon Schools will use temporary facilities beginning in the 2014-15 school year while constructing buildings, the district's state-appointed superintendent, Paymon Rouhanifard, said Friday. Neither operator has received state Department of Education approval, as required by law, to operate the district-charter hybrid schools, and plans for permanent facilities are vague, but the district made the announcement anyway to allow the operators to get a jump on enrollment, spokesman Brendan Lowe said.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A third state agency is pointing to potential legal problems in Gov. Tom Corbett's stalled plan to hire a British company to manage the $3.5 billion Pennsylvania Lottery. The chief counsel of the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board wrote in a letter last month that the proposed contract documents are ambiguous and do not say clearly what kinds of new gambling Camelot Global Services would be allowed to operate. As a result, it is impossible to say whether it infringes on state casino gambling laws, the gaming board's top lawyer, Douglas Sherman, wrote in his seven-page letter.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Corbett administration is poised to revise its contract with Camelot Global Services in an effort to salvage its deal to privatize the management of the Pennsylvania Lottery. London-based Camelot's bid to run the lottery was rejected last month by Attorney General Kathleen Kane, whose office reviews all state contracts for legality. Kane ruled that parts of the deal violated the state constitution. Corbett, according to legislative leaders briefed on the matter, is leaning toward making changes in the contract, which he would then resubmit to Kane's office.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
THERE IS MORE than one reason to applaud Attorney General Kathleen Kane's challenge to Gov. Corbett's deal to privatize the state lottery. Last week, Kane held a news conference to announce that her office was rejecting Corbett's contract with Camelot, the British firm that was to take over the management of the state's $3.5 billion lottery, saying the contract was unconstitutional. That left Corbett scrambling to salvage the deal, and got Camelot to extend its bid by another weekwhile it explored its options.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The British firm that has bid $34 billion to run the Pennsylvania Lottery says it can do for the commonwealth what it did in Britain: boost revenue for social services and other programs. A Camelot Global Services executive, speaking publicly for the first time about the bid, said Thursday the company was confident that it would be able to eclipse the lottery's current revenue and provide more to help the state's growing elderly population. "It's a great deal for the seniors of Pennsylvania as beneficiaries," Alex Kovach, Camelot's managing director, said in a telephone interview.
SPORTS
June 3, 2012
The million-dollar home of former Heisman Trophy winner Eddie George and his wife, Tamara , will be auctioned off June 7, much to the surprise of the owners. The couple's accountant told The Tennessean in Nashville that the Georges have been trying to modify their loan for seven months, but find themselves in the same situation as many homeowners - stuck with a house no longer worth what was paid for it. The accountant said George is financially stable. The couple bought the home in a Nashville suburb for more than $1.6 million in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
DVD releases that sing big, walk tall, and go deep hit stores this week. Camelot, Grade A: The 45th anniversary of the film version of the Tony Award-winning stage production from Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe is being marked with the release of a special Blu-ray that includes 36 pages of photos, trivia, and more. The wonderful musical, directed by Joshua Logan, based on T.H. White's The Once and Future King, looks at the lives and loves of those during the reign of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.
SPORTS
November 10, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
This was the image that was supposed to endure, the image that generations of trusting, ebullient Penn Staters had been raised on, the image that had not yet been sullied by the spreading stain of horrific scandal: Out of the tunnel and into the golden glory of autumn sunlight they come, the ground shaking beneath them, legions of imposingly large young men, armored and helmeted and led by a feisty rooster of a man who punches the tart October...
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