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Camembert

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FOOD
January 26, 1994 | By Patricia Wells, FOR THE INQUIRER
As the story goes, the Camembert we know today came of age a little more than 200 years ago, in 1791, in the Normandy village of Vimoutiers. There, Madame Marie Harel made stout little cow's-milk cheeses, two inches in diameter, that she took to the local market. It was the period of la Revolution, la Terreur, and during that time Harel sheltered a cousin, a young abbot who was fleeing from the terrors of Meaux. He watched her cheesemaking, and, under his tutelage, she slowly began to make the cheese more Brie-like and twice its regular size.
FOOD
February 14, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
There's enough bad press about cheese to make a self-respecting cow think of kicking the bucket. Cited as a harbinger of heart attack, and spurned by generations of bland-palate diners as a food that only the smell-blind could love, an entire world of noble cheeses with all their gustatory idiosyncrasies is rapidly being processed into near-extinction. When is the last time you had a Camembert bulging ripe, pungent with raw Norman milk and a sweet hint of almond? Is there a Cheddar in your memory clabbered to a curd so fat that every slice hovers between solidarity and total collapse?
NEWS
January 13, 1998
The most frightened people in history Without a war on their own territory for a century and a half, Americans love to scare themselves. The books of Stephen King . . . enjoy a tremendous popularity. . . .Unpasteurized cheeses with mold - Camembert and Brie - are absolutely forbidden . . . Meryl Streep, the world-renowned biochemist who does some acting on the side, warned on television against serving apples and apple juice to children. Jacek Kalabinsky Polityka (Warsaw), Nov. 1, 1997
FOOD
December 27, 2007
Green Hill is named for the verdant Georgia pastures where the Sweet Grass Dairy cows get their munching groove on. And you can actually see the deep maize hue of beta-carotene in this creamy cheese that a rich grass diet lends their milk. Well-salted and properly aged, an oozy Green Hill also takes on the glossy shine and taffylike stretch that only the best soft cheeses can acquire. And this is consistently one of the best bloomy-rind rounds I've tasted from America, shaped like a Camembert puck, but with the milder personality of a Brie.
FOOD
November 1, 2012
In this golden age of cheese it's now easily assumed that curds must be artisanally crafted to be worth attention. But after devouring the beefy wedge of oozy Pont-l'Evêque, I agree with Downtown Cheese owner Jack Morgan that there are stellar exceptions: "The industrialization of a cheese doesn't mean necessarily it's going to be poor quality. " Granted, Pont-l'Evêque benefits from the tradition of its 13th-century roots, even though it's relatively mass-produced in Normandy by companies such as Graindorge.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Paul Maryniak contributed to this report.)
The bacterium Listeria monocytogenis is a common cause of illness in large animals, but infects humans only rarely, a Temple University medical researcher said this morning. The illness caused by the bacterium, listeriosis, is "a real uncommon disease," said Dr. Bennett Lorber, the researcher who noticed a cluster of cases in the Philadelphia area. "The humans who get it, it's a very particular risk group. This isn't something I would ever worry about," Lorber said today. That said, Lorber advised that "pregnant women should avoid eating soft cheeses - period.
FOOD
December 18, 2003 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
The perfect ending to a fine meal doesn't have to be a sugary dessert. A pleasant alternative in the European tradition is to conclude dinner with a bit of cheese and fruit or other suitable accompaniments. An after-dinner cheese course can be as elaborate or simple as your tastes and budget allow. A festive spread for a holiday or other occasion could include a cheese board with several domestic and imported varieties, a cornucopia of fruits and nuts, assorted breads and crackers, chocolates, and a selection of wines and other beverages.
FOOD
March 7, 1993 | By Lydia L. Denworth, FOR THE INQUIRER
My husband and I recently moved to France. I knew setting up life in a new country could be complicated, but I always found sustenance in the thought of French food. Eating, certainly, would be the easy part. I would happily munch buttery croissants for my breakfast, spread Camembert on my baguette for lunch, and indulge in everything from steak frites to foie gras for dinner. And, of course, the wine would flow freely at every meal. I was not wrong, but eating in France has not been the never-ending joy I imagined it would be. Soon after our arrival, I came up against a problem much graver than choosing between pain au chocolat or a madeleine for my afternoon snack: Etiquette.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2001 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
CBS has Survivor: The Australian Outback. Fox has Temptation Island. Given the hype and the audience numbers generated by these soul-baring spectacles, it's only a matter of time before other networks tailor similarly lurid concepts to their particular formats. Now, we're just speculating here, but if shows such as the following actually make it out of development, don't say we didn't warn you. Food Network's "Garden of Eden. " Fifteen celebrity gourmands - including Eli Zabar, Wolfgang Puck, Monica Lewinsky and Charles Barkley - are abandoned on a palmy isle abundantly stocked with caviar, foie gras, champagne, lobster, white truffles, fine cheeses, exquisite chocolates and Big Macs.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
It all started with a group of Havertown construction workers sitting around eating cheese. Or something like that. About 50 years ago, the story goes, a small group of working men began meeting every Tuesday night at a Havertown hunting lodge on Karakung Drive. Fellowship and a good time were the evening's only goals. The game was probably pinochle, the conversation - which heavyweight contender could challenge Joe Louis in the ring. The mood was always merry and the food and drink in abundance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 1, 2012
In this golden age of cheese it's now easily assumed that curds must be artisanally crafted to be worth attention. But after devouring the beefy wedge of oozy Pont-l'Evêque, I agree with Downtown Cheese owner Jack Morgan that there are stellar exceptions: "The industrialization of a cheese doesn't mean necessarily it's going to be poor quality. " Granted, Pont-l'Evêque benefits from the tradition of its 13th-century roots, even though it's relatively mass-produced in Normandy by companies such as Graindorge.
FOOD
December 27, 2007
Green Hill is named for the verdant Georgia pastures where the Sweet Grass Dairy cows get their munching groove on. And you can actually see the deep maize hue of beta-carotene in this creamy cheese that a rich grass diet lends their milk. Well-salted and properly aged, an oozy Green Hill also takes on the glossy shine and taffylike stretch that only the best soft cheeses can acquire. And this is consistently one of the best bloomy-rind rounds I've tasted from America, shaped like a Camembert puck, but with the milder personality of a Brie.
FOOD
December 18, 2003 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
The perfect ending to a fine meal doesn't have to be a sugary dessert. A pleasant alternative in the European tradition is to conclude dinner with a bit of cheese and fruit or other suitable accompaniments. An after-dinner cheese course can be as elaborate or simple as your tastes and budget allow. A festive spread for a holiday or other occasion could include a cheese board with several domestic and imported varieties, a cornucopia of fruits and nuts, assorted breads and crackers, chocolates, and a selection of wines and other beverages.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2001 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
CBS has Survivor: The Australian Outback. Fox has Temptation Island. Given the hype and the audience numbers generated by these soul-baring spectacles, it's only a matter of time before other networks tailor similarly lurid concepts to their particular formats. Now, we're just speculating here, but if shows such as the following actually make it out of development, don't say we didn't warn you. Food Network's "Garden of Eden. " Fifteen celebrity gourmands - including Eli Zabar, Wolfgang Puck, Monica Lewinsky and Charles Barkley - are abandoned on a palmy isle abundantly stocked with caviar, foie gras, champagne, lobster, white truffles, fine cheeses, exquisite chocolates and Big Macs.
FOOD
April 18, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Taleggio has never had great PR, although I suspect this is due, in part, to the fact that it is crusty and tends to stink. In the universe of Italian cheeses, though, it also has plenty of competition for the limelight. It doesn't have the golden translucence of shaved Parmigiano Reggiano. It doesn't have the perky bounce of a milky fresh mozzarella ball. It doesn't hang majestically from the ceiling like a chimney stack of aged provolone. And it lacks the suave blue streaks of creamy Gorgonzola.
NEWS
January 13, 1998
The most frightened people in history Without a war on their own territory for a century and a half, Americans love to scare themselves. The books of Stephen King . . . enjoy a tremendous popularity. . . .Unpasteurized cheeses with mold - Camembert and Brie - are absolutely forbidden . . . Meryl Streep, the world-renowned biochemist who does some acting on the side, warned on television against serving apples and apple juice to children. Jacek Kalabinsky Polityka (Warsaw), Nov. 1, 1997
FOOD
September 13, 1995 | By Patsy Swendson and June Hayes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Of the many tastes, temptations and traditions associated with Texas foods, perhaps the most comforting are those recipes made with fresh eggs and rich cheese, ingredients essential to the Texas pantry. Artworks, books, movies and television programs that have romanticized the Lone Star lifestyle often focus on the meat-and-potatoes aspect of Texas menus. Little is heard about the rich, eggy ice creams that are shipped by private plane to points north, south, east and west, or the bountiful quantities of cheese that appear in markets from coast to coast.
FOOD
January 26, 1994 | By Patricia Wells, FOR THE INQUIRER
As the story goes, the Camembert we know today came of age a little more than 200 years ago, in 1791, in the Normandy village of Vimoutiers. There, Madame Marie Harel made stout little cow's-milk cheeses, two inches in diameter, that she took to the local market. It was the period of la Revolution, la Terreur, and during that time Harel sheltered a cousin, a young abbot who was fleeing from the terrors of Meaux. He watched her cheesemaking, and, under his tutelage, she slowly began to make the cheese more Brie-like and twice its regular size.
FOOD
March 7, 1993 | By Lydia L. Denworth, FOR THE INQUIRER
My husband and I recently moved to France. I knew setting up life in a new country could be complicated, but I always found sustenance in the thought of French food. Eating, certainly, would be the easy part. I would happily munch buttery croissants for my breakfast, spread Camembert on my baguette for lunch, and indulge in everything from steak frites to foie gras for dinner. And, of course, the wine would flow freely at every meal. I was not wrong, but eating in France has not been the never-ending joy I imagined it would be. Soon after our arrival, I came up against a problem much graver than choosing between pain au chocolat or a madeleine for my afternoon snack: Etiquette.
FOOD
May 1, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
There are times when preparing a lavish dish, rich in butter and cream, appeals to the senses. And then there are times when a lean version of the preparation seems to be in order. For anyone who's ever had to choose between the two, Lean or Lavish (Warner Books, $12.95 paperback) by food writer Judith Pacht makes the decision an easy one. Pacht's book - as indicated by its name - offers two versions of more than 80 dishes, giving the cook the option of whether to go "deliciously healthy" or "delectably decadent.
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