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TRAVEL
June 19, 2011
Bron Imaging Group has reinvented the camera strap, which should benefit travelers toting bulky cameras. Designed to improve both comfort and security, Bron's Sun Sniper Pro padded adjustable camera straps are nylon, reinforced internally with steel wire, so they won't break and can't be snipped by would-be thieves. Unlike most conventional camera straps, which buckle or hook onto metal loops on the sides of the camera, the Sun Sniper attaches via a stainless-steel ball bearing that screws into the tripod socket on the bottom of the camera, making for more flexible movement when lifting to shoot.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2013 | By Alexandra Pecci, For The Inquirer
On Boston's Beacon Hill, a bright-red door, illuminated by a hanging lantern and framed by a brick archway, struck me as beautiful. So I pointed my camera and shot picture after picture until the door swung open, and a barefoot guy emerged, his hair a little tousled, his white T-shirt wrinkled from sleep. He didn't look up at the group of camera-wielding tourists standing feet away from him on the sidewalk. He simply bent over, plucked the newspaper from his stoop, and retreated quickly back into the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1989 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Winter is a grand time to make pictures outdoors, but it's also bad news for camera equipment. Batteries lose their zip. Shutters grow sluggish and film becomes brittle - the shutter speed you choose may not be the one you get, and the film sprockets tear inside your camera. Lenses fog up. Exposure meters begin acting strange when you most need them to expose subjects properly against the glare of ice or snow. You can't expect the camera that served so well in the spring and summer to function flawlessly in the cold unless you take care of it. For starters, install fresh batteries for everything - the meter, winder and flash.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"What you see is what you get" in new picture grabbers from Canon, Sharp and Polaroid. Canon has dreamed up a 35mm still camera so smart you'll think it's reading your mind. No matter where the object of your affection is moving within the field of the viewfinder, the camera knows what to keep in focus. Conventional auto-focus systems zero in only on the object in the direct center of the viewfinder. Canon's system, dubbed "eye-controlled autofocus," bounces a reflected infrared beam off the eyeball that's glued to the viewfinder.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A movie like Everlasting Moments comes along maybe once in a decade. It is a portrait, incandescent and inspiring, of an accidental portraitist. She is Maria Larsson, Finnish emigrant to the port city of Malmo, Sweden, at the dawn of the 20th century. Maria, a working-class woman without pretensions, is nonetheless an artist of considerable gifts. Her medium is photography. Watch how instinctively she frames a fugitive image, like a child gently cupping a butterfly in her hands.
LIVING
November 29, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
A camera, however expensive or sophisticated, does not a photographer make. That point has been made here, in varying degrees of shrillness, no fewer than a dozen times in the last year alone, but it bears repeating. The photographer has to learn to see, to think, to compose through the viewfinder, and to move around to get the best photographs. The photographer who does all these well will find almost any camera an adequate tool. In other words, photographers need to worry less about the special gear they think they need and more about training themselves to use the cameras they already have.
SPORTS
December 12, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
John Daly smashed a spectator's camera into a tree yesterday while shooting a 6-over 78 in the first round of the Australian Open in Sydney. After pushing his tee shot wide on the ninth hole at the Royal Sydney Golf Club, Daly walked into a clump of trees, where spectator Brad Clegg tried to take a picture at close range. Daly snatched the camera and smashed it against the nearest tree, telling the man: "You want it back, I'll buy you a new one. " He later released a statement saying Clegg got too close.
SPORTS
August 2, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
If Michael Jordan hits a home run and it's not on video, did it happen? The Birmingham Barons outfielder, whose career highlights so far have been filmed inside NBA arenas, hopes to find a videotape of his first professional home run. Jordan's homer at Hoover (Ala.) Stadium on Saturday came so late in the evening that local television photographers had already packed up. "It was the bottom of the eighth and a late night," said team spokesman Chris Pika. "We would like to have a copy of it, and I think Michael would, too. " So the Barons are trying to get the word out to anyone in the record crowd of 13,751 who might have had a camera running when Jordan hit his homer.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Stephen Hagenbuch
As summer came to a close, I went for a run at the high school, a blazing end-of-summer sun beating overhead. But forget that exertion: I was exhausted much more by the two super-Moms I saw afterwards. It was the perfect day for a trip to the playground - and for some beautiful childhood memories. There were sunny skies and wide fields, swing sets and wooden forts, and slides for the mischief of American childhood. You and I might have made that mischief and memories on our own - but in this age of limitless gigabytes, it seems those memories now are to be scripted, posed, photographed and (due to that pesky childishness)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even before 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. - before Eric Garner died after New York City police officers put him in a choke hold - civil rights advocates were calling for police officers to wear cameras that record their interactions with the public. It's a policy, they say, that would protect people against police brutality and exonerate officers wrongfully accused of misconduct. It's a policy already in place in at least three major departments, and in the aftermath of Brown's and Garner's high-profile cases, calls for the cameras are gaining momentum.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evesham's police officers have recorded 3,705 incidents while on patrol in the two weeks since they began wearing body cameras, Chief Christopher Chew said Tuesday. "I love it. It's a game changer," he said in an interview at police headquarters, where he played several clips to illustrate the new technology and his rationale for introducing it. In one, an officer just starting his shift responds to a report of a man stumbling around the lobby of town hall. The officer taps the camera, which he is wearing on his sternum, to start the audio, then steps into the lobby.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years after the Pennsylvania legislature allowed red-light camera systems to expand beyond Philadelphia, Abington is the only suburb to install one. Under a one-year pilot program, cameras were slated to begin monitoring three of Abington's busiest intersections at 12:01 a.m. Friday. After a two-month grace period, violations caught by the camera will result in a $100 fine to the owner of the vehicle. The 11 other towns in Southeastern Pennsylvania large enough to qualify for red-light cameras have either ignored or rejected the idea.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Ride-share" services Uber and Lyft won temporary authority from the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday to operate in Pittsburgh and surrounding Allegheny County. In another development, taxi cabs in Philadelphia will be required to install security cameras this year, following approval Thursday by the state Independent Regulatory Review Commission. The security cameras will monitor both the driver and passengers, and are designed to improve safety for both, said the Philadelphia Parking Authority, which regulates taxis in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hope is that the secretive northern pine snake, a large white constrictor with black and brown blotches, will mug for the cameras being mounted near the wildlife crossings beneath the Atlantic City Expressway. The crossings were created inside four culverts below the well-traveled Jersey Shore route about a year ago to protect the threatened snake and other creatures, at the direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. The nonvenomous reptile, which can grow to up to seven feet in length, is one of several rare animals that exist in diminishing numbers in the Pinelands, a national preserve sliced in half by the six-lane highway.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA police are field testing video cameras that clip onto officers' shirts and record everything they do, officials announced Tuesday. The camera, which connects to an officer's handheld police radio, records video and audio, and can take photos, said SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel. "The benefit of that is that every contact that an officer has will then be video- and audiotaped. It's a tremendous benefit for police, a tremendous benefit for the public," Nestel said. "We're experimenting.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU see a SEPTA Transit Police officer in the next few days, be sure to smile - you may be on camera. This week, the force is beginning a trial run of body-mounted cameras on its officers, an initiative officials have had their eyes on for months. "It improves public trust," SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said. "If people know police have cameras on uniform, they have more faith that officers are acting properly. " Nestel's a self-admitted fan of technology - he boasts more than 2,000 Twitter followers - and says the cameras can be a valuable tool for the force.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Parking Authority can proceed with the new operator of its red-light camera program, according to a Commonwealth Court decision announced Friday. A three-judge panel denied a request by American Traffic Solutions Inc. of Tempe, Ariz., to void PPA's contract with Xerox State & Local Solutions Inc., a unit of Xerox Corp., of Norwalk, Conn. PPA Executive Director Vince Fenerty said in a statement that the aim of the camera program "had always been to reduce red-light running and save lives," and that the ruling would allow the transition to Xerox to continue.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Confronting a recent rash of homicides, Chester Mayor John Linder said Wednesday that he wants at least a tenfold increase in the number of security cameras monitoring the streets of his city. So far this year, 14 homicides have been reported in Chester, the first time in at least a decade the number has reached double digits this early, according to state data. No suspects have been arrested in any of those cases, Linder said. Installing more than 100 cameras around the city would make residents feel safer and help police solve crimes when witnesses are reluctant to step forward, he said in an interview.
SPORTS
April 28, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the record-holder for the most interceptions in a season, Rayshaun Kizer has shown a knack for keeping his eyes on the ball in the Arena Football League. Now your eyes can see what his are seeing. In Sunday's game against the Iowa Barnstormers, the Soul defensive back plans to wear a helmet equipped with an impact-resistant, high-definition video camera. The television production crew will pop the memory card out of his helmet when he's on the sideline and run it to the broadcast booth for use in game coverage on ESPN2.
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