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TRAVEL
June 19, 2011
Bron Imaging Group has reinvented the camera strap, which should benefit travelers toting bulky cameras. Designed to improve both comfort and security, Bron's Sun Sniper Pro padded adjustable camera straps are nylon, reinforced internally with steel wire, so they won't break and can't be snipped by would-be thieves. Unlike most conventional camera straps, which buckle or hook onto metal loops on the sides of the camera, the Sun Sniper attaches via a stainless-steel ball bearing that screws into the tripod socket on the bottom of the camera, making for more flexible movement when lifting to shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1989 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Winter is a grand time to make pictures outdoors, but it's also bad news for camera equipment. Batteries lose their zip. Shutters grow sluggish and film becomes brittle - the shutter speed you choose may not be the one you get, and the film sprockets tear inside your camera. Lenses fog up. Exposure meters begin acting strange when you most need them to expose subjects properly against the glare of ice or snow. You can't expect the camera that served so well in the spring and summer to function flawlessly in the cold unless you take care of it. For starters, install fresh batteries for everything - the meter, winder and flash.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"What you see is what you get" in new picture grabbers from Canon, Sharp and Polaroid. Canon has dreamed up a 35mm still camera so smart you'll think it's reading your mind. No matter where the object of your affection is moving within the field of the viewfinder, the camera knows what to keep in focus. Conventional auto-focus systems zero in only on the object in the direct center of the viewfinder. Canon's system, dubbed "eye-controlled autofocus," bounces a reflected infrared beam off the eyeball that's glued to the viewfinder.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2013 | By Alexandra Pecci, For The Inquirer
On Boston's Beacon Hill, a bright-red door, illuminated by a hanging lantern and framed by a brick archway, struck me as beautiful. So I pointed my camera and shot picture after picture until the door swung open, and a barefoot guy emerged, his hair a little tousled, his white T-shirt wrinkled from sleep. He didn't look up at the group of camera-wielding tourists standing feet away from him on the sidewalk. He simply bent over, plucked the newspaper from his stoop, and retreated quickly back into the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A movie like Everlasting Moments comes along maybe once in a decade. It is a portrait, incandescent and inspiring, of an accidental portraitist. She is Maria Larsson, Finnish emigrant to the port city of Malmo, Sweden, at the dawn of the 20th century. Maria, a working-class woman without pretensions, is nonetheless an artist of considerable gifts. Her medium is photography. Watch how instinctively she frames a fugitive image, like a child gently cupping a butterfly in her hands.
LIVING
November 29, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
A camera, however expensive or sophisticated, does not a photographer make. That point has been made here, in varying degrees of shrillness, no fewer than a dozen times in the last year alone, but it bears repeating. The photographer has to learn to see, to think, to compose through the viewfinder, and to move around to get the best photographs. The photographer who does all these well will find almost any camera an adequate tool. In other words, photographers need to worry less about the special gear they think they need and more about training themselves to use the cameras they already have.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
A Main Line man accused of sexually abusing a family member has been charged with assault for striking the hand of a journalist, swatting at his camera, and knocking it to the ground and damaging it. In addition to simple assault, Charles Robinson, 60, of Gable Road in Paoli, was charged this week with harassment and criminal mischief, according to public records. On Jan. 8, as Robinson left the Newtown Square court after waiving a preliminary hearing in the sexual assault case, he shoved several members of the media and struck the hand of Richard Ilgenfritz, a reporter with Main Line Media News, knocking his Nikon camera out of his hand.
SPORTS
December 12, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
John Daly smashed a spectator's camera into a tree yesterday while shooting a 6-over 78 in the first round of the Australian Open in Sydney. After pushing his tee shot wide on the ninth hole at the Royal Sydney Golf Club, Daly walked into a clump of trees, where spectator Brad Clegg tried to take a picture at close range. Daly snatched the camera and smashed it against the nearest tree, telling the man: "You want it back, I'll buy you a new one. " He later released a statement saying Clegg got too close.
SPORTS
August 2, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
If Michael Jordan hits a home run and it's not on video, did it happen? The Birmingham Barons outfielder, whose career highlights so far have been filmed inside NBA arenas, hopes to find a videotape of his first professional home run. Jordan's homer at Hoover (Ala.) Stadium on Saturday came so late in the evening that local television photographers had already packed up. "It was the bottom of the eighth and a late night," said team spokesman Chris Pika. "We would like to have a copy of it, and I think Michael would, too. " So the Barons are trying to get the word out to anyone in the record crowd of 13,751 who might have had a camera running when Jordan hit his homer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Next week, Burlington Township Police Department officers will add a tool to their arsenals: body-worn cameras. On Monday, five members of the local force will come to work with baseball-size cameras affixed to their blue uniform shirts. The more than three dozen remaining officers in the department will begin using the cameras by September, after completing individual training. A combination of capital funds and grants amounting to $68,500, including $22,000 from the state Attorney General's Body Worn Camera Assistance Fund, has bought the department 50 cameras for its 43 officers.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe and Daniel Block, STAFF WRITERS
When six police officers fired nearly 100 bullets at Shalamar Longer in February, killing him after a police chase through Chester, the violence-ridden city found itself in the cross fire of a debate playing out in other places across the country in recent years. Residents called the shots excessive. Police called them justified. And convincing evidence was lacking for either viewpoint. On Monday, Chester City officials said they hoped to avoid such situations in the future - starting with the rollout of a body-camera program for the city's police department, scheduled to take effect immediately.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Two attorneys representing 11 former students at the Hershey School for poor children have filed documents in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court initiating lawsuits against the 2,000-student boarding institution for invasion of privacy and other misconduct. Attorney Tom Kline said on Friday the documents relate to the activities of a fired, gun-toting Hershey School employee Marcus Burns, who hid a camera in the bathroom of one of the boarding facilities for senior male students. The papers he and Harrisburg attorney Benjamin Andreozzi filed - writs of summons - are precursors to lawsuits with specific allegations.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Nearly $5.5 million collected from fines for red-light violations at 28 Philadelphia intersections will fund 23 safety-improvement projects in 18 municipalities across the state, Gov. Wolf announced Monday. The biggest chunk of money - $2.8 million - will go to five projects in Philadelphia, including $1 million for safety improvements at 30 to 50 "crash locations," according to a news release. Michael Carroll, acting commissioner of the Philadelphia Streets Department, said the city would have three years in which to identify the sites and use the Automated Red Light Enforcement grant.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman and Michael Boren, STAFF WRITERS
TRENTON - A 2014 law requiring all New Jersey municipalities to outfit new police patrol cars with dashboard cameras is unconstitutional because it does not provide an adequate funding source, a state board ruled Wednesday. The ruling by the Council on Local Mandates on a challenge brought by Deptford Township, Gloucester County, could relieve stress on municipal budgets across the state. The council did not weigh in on the merits of the politically charged debate over the utility of dashboard and body cameras in improving police accountability.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, STAFF WRITER
It was the "Erin Express" — a day of partying with friends the Saturday before St. Patrick's Day — and Casey Walsh said she and her friends had started at 2 p.m. in a house in Rittenhouse Square. Twelve hours later, after a pub-crawl around the square, Walsh saw one of her friends, Colin McGovern, 24, of Bucks County, stabbed after making an offhand remark about a stranger's New Jersey Devils sports cap. Walsh was the prosecution's main witness at Wednesday's preliminary hearing for Steven Simminger, a 40-year-old Delaware County man charged with fatally stabbing McGovern shortly after 2 a.m. March 13. Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Bradley K. Moss ordered Simminger to stand trial on first- and third-degree murder charges.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Sarah Stuart
IN 2013, Feltonville resident Samara Banks and three of her children were killed by a driver racing another motorist, traffic light to traffic light on Roosevelt Boulevard. Why would anyone blatantly speed on a road posted at 45 mph? Because racing on an overly wide Roosevelt Boulevard is easy and has too few consequences. The only consequence that night was four innocents losing their lives. But, sadly, they weren't the only ones. In Philadelphia, speed-related crashes kill nearly 100 people a year.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Show-and-tell with the security cam purveyors at the Panasonic System Communications Co. in Newark, N.J., was more engaging than TV news. First they shared a startling video of a house exploding from a gas leak in Stafford Township, N.J., as captured on a local police cruiser's Panasonic dash cam. This onboard camera system is always "live-buffering" a little bit (recording the last 30-90 seconds) of video "just in case you need to save it," said Greg Peratt, vice president of Panasonic's Security Business Unit for the U.S. The system is triggered to capture a full incident when flashing lights and siren are turned on, the police car is going fast, a gun comes out of the holster, or a crash is detected.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2016 | By Jack Tomczuk, Staff Writer
Customers crowded Ott's Camera shop on Castor Avenue for the final time last weekend, drawn by the 50 percent off sign in the front window. Some were longtime customers, some were photographers looking for a deal. And others wandered in, combing through the frames, greeting cards, and DVDs that remained. "It's a giant job, cleaning a place up after 68 years," said owner Bob Ott, 69. Ott's, known in Northeast Philadelphia for its retro storefront and large neon sign, is closing, following a trend of many older businesses shutting down on Castor Avenue in Oxford Circle, Castor Gardens and Rhawnhurst.
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