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TRAVEL
June 19, 2011
Bron Imaging Group has reinvented the camera strap, which should benefit travelers toting bulky cameras. Designed to improve both comfort and security, Bron's Sun Sniper Pro padded adjustable camera straps are nylon, reinforced internally with steel wire, so they won't break and can't be snipped by would-be thieves. Unlike most conventional camera straps, which buckle or hook onto metal loops on the sides of the camera, the Sun Sniper attaches via a stainless-steel ball bearing that screws into the tripod socket on the bottom of the camera, making for more flexible movement when lifting to shoot.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2013 | By Alexandra Pecci, For The Inquirer
On Boston's Beacon Hill, a bright-red door, illuminated by a hanging lantern and framed by a brick archway, struck me as beautiful. So I pointed my camera and shot picture after picture until the door swung open, and a barefoot guy emerged, his hair a little tousled, his white T-shirt wrinkled from sleep. He didn't look up at the group of camera-wielding tourists standing feet away from him on the sidewalk. He simply bent over, plucked the newspaper from his stoop, and retreated quickly back into the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1989 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Winter is a grand time to make pictures outdoors, but it's also bad news for camera equipment. Batteries lose their zip. Shutters grow sluggish and film becomes brittle - the shutter speed you choose may not be the one you get, and the film sprockets tear inside your camera. Lenses fog up. Exposure meters begin acting strange when you most need them to expose subjects properly against the glare of ice or snow. You can't expect the camera that served so well in the spring and summer to function flawlessly in the cold unless you take care of it. For starters, install fresh batteries for everything - the meter, winder and flash.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"What you see is what you get" in new picture grabbers from Canon, Sharp and Polaroid. Canon has dreamed up a 35mm still camera so smart you'll think it's reading your mind. No matter where the object of your affection is moving within the field of the viewfinder, the camera knows what to keep in focus. Conventional auto-focus systems zero in only on the object in the direct center of the viewfinder. Canon's system, dubbed "eye-controlled autofocus," bounces a reflected infrared beam off the eyeball that's glued to the viewfinder.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A movie like Everlasting Moments comes along maybe once in a decade. It is a portrait, incandescent and inspiring, of an accidental portraitist. She is Maria Larsson, Finnish emigrant to the port city of Malmo, Sweden, at the dawn of the 20th century. Maria, a working-class woman without pretensions, is nonetheless an artist of considerable gifts. Her medium is photography. Watch how instinctively she frames a fugitive image, like a child gently cupping a butterfly in her hands.
LIVING
November 29, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
A camera, however expensive or sophisticated, does not a photographer make. That point has been made here, in varying degrees of shrillness, no fewer than a dozen times in the last year alone, but it bears repeating. The photographer has to learn to see, to think, to compose through the viewfinder, and to move around to get the best photographs. The photographer who does all these well will find almost any camera an adequate tool. In other words, photographers need to worry less about the special gear they think they need and more about training themselves to use the cameras they already have.
SPORTS
December 12, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
John Daly smashed a spectator's camera into a tree yesterday while shooting a 6-over 78 in the first round of the Australian Open in Sydney. After pushing his tee shot wide on the ninth hole at the Royal Sydney Golf Club, Daly walked into a clump of trees, where spectator Brad Clegg tried to take a picture at close range. Daly snatched the camera and smashed it against the nearest tree, telling the man: "You want it back, I'll buy you a new one. " He later released a statement saying Clegg got too close.
SPORTS
August 2, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
If Michael Jordan hits a home run and it's not on video, did it happen? The Birmingham Barons outfielder, whose career highlights so far have been filmed inside NBA arenas, hopes to find a videotape of his first professional home run. Jordan's homer at Hoover (Ala.) Stadium on Saturday came so late in the evening that local television photographers had already packed up. "It was the bottom of the eighth and a late night," said team spokesman Chris Pika. "We would like to have a copy of it, and I think Michael would, too. " So the Barons are trying to get the word out to anyone in the record crowd of 13,751 who might have had a camera running when Jordan hit his homer.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Stephen Hagenbuch
As summer came to a close, I went for a run at the high school, a blazing end-of-summer sun beating overhead. But forget that exertion: I was exhausted much more by the two super-Moms I saw afterwards. It was the perfect day for a trip to the playground - and for some beautiful childhood memories. There were sunny skies and wide fields, swing sets and wooden forts, and slides for the mischief of American childhood. You and I might have made that mischief and memories on our own - but in this age of limitless gigabytes, it seems those memories now are to be scripted, posed, photographed and (due to that pesky childishness)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cameras mounted inside wildlife crossings beneath the Atlantic City Expressway a year ago have produced a few amusing images but not hard evidence of the passageway's usage. A curious but common everyday raccoon sits up on hind legs and peers into the darkness in one of seven images the state Department of Environmental Protection released this month. Then there's a beaver with a mouth full of sticks, and a young, white-tailed deer that resembles a Chihuahua as its oversize ears are illuminated by the beams of a brilliant sun. But the endangered northern pine snake and the tiny tree frogs targeted for protection have not been captured by any of the eight motion-triggered cameras inside the culverts under the highway.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Rachel De Barros launched her first car-related business while a student at Ohio University. She printed pink fliers with her name and phone number, promoting herself as a door-to-door mechanic. An oil change? Brake job? Simple repair? De Barros was for hire. No one called. "I would wait by the phone, like, Come on! I need money, " said De Barros, 37, of Feasterville, staring at a spot on the table where a phone would be. "So I changed the fliers, made them white, and wrote, 'Call Jimmy.' Then I started getting calls.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia mayoral candidate Jim Kenney is ready for his close-up - as long as his is the only face in the camera's frame. Kenney's campaign had been haggling with NBC10 about camera angles for an upcoming debate, according to campaign spokeswoman Lauren Hitt. Kenney, the Democratic nominee, was fine with close-ups and reaction shots, but didn't want the TV station to use "one particular shot, a split-screen close-up," when Melissa Murray Bailey, his Republican opponent, was speaking, Hitt said.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Philadelphia suburb Deptford Township has the wrong perspective on New Jersey's effort to equip all state troopers and police officers with body cameras, which local officials criticize as an unfunded mandate. Body cameras are fast on their way to becoming as ubiquitous as guns and body armor in police departments. While a number of high-profile recent cases have shown that cameras can create valuable records of police misconduct, they can also protect officers from false allegations.
NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
With clamor to equip police with cameras growing - last week, New Jersey officials announced a program to equip all state troopers with body cameras and pressed local departments to do the same - one South Jersey township is raising a difficult question: Who'll pay for them? Deptford Township has brought its funding concerns to a little-known state board, arguing that a recently enacted law requiring dashboard cameras in all newly acquired police cruisers will burden its taxpayers.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Michael Boren and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
The New Jersey State Police will spend $1.5 million to acquire 1,000 body cameras for troopers, Gov. Christie's office said Tuesday while also announcing new guidelines aimed at expanding disclosures about investigations of officers' use of force. While state police cruisers have had dashboard cameras for years, this will be the first time troopers will wear cameras. The equipment is expected to be rolled out during the next few months, with all troopers on patrol getting the gear by the middle of next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News Staff Writer
Local Twitter mayhem "Orange Is the New Black" and "Hemlock Grove" star  Madeline Brewer , who hails from nearby Pitman, N.J., stopped by WXPN's XPoNential outdoor music fest Sunday evening. From the audience, she took to social media to express her enthusiasm for headliner  Grace Potter . But she experienced a bit of confusion when she put a call on Twitter for "bubbles," and instead got fans thinking she wanted drugs. To clarify, she was looking for champagne.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Transportation Safety Board on Wednesday urged Amtrak to install "crash- and fire-protected inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders" on all locomotives. The recommendation came in response to the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188 in Port Richmond that killed eight passengers and injured 200. Amtrak CEO Joseph Boardman said last month that Amtrak would install inward-facing video cameras in all of its 300 locomotives, starting with 70 Siemens locomotives now being put into service on the Northeast Corridor.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
AT FIRST, the commotion in front of the old police district's front walls attracted some stares. Then drivers pulled over and started taking pictures with their phones. Some marched up to police officers who were standing around and peppered them with questions. And then the damnedest thing happened: People started smiling. Laughing. Might even have done a little clapping, too. Velvet ropes, a red carpet and balloons hugged the entrance to Olney's 35th District headquarters — in honor of a movie night for dozens of excited local kids.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE DEATH OF Philadelphia college student Shane Montgomery, who went missing after a night of drinking in November and whose body was pulled from the frigid Schuylkill more than a month later, has spurred introduction of legislation that would require bars and restaurants to install outside surveillance cameras. City Council's Committee on Public Safety yesterday began taking testimony on the feasibility of such a law, but does not expect to take action until the fall so that all stakeholders can weigh in, said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., who sponsored the bill.
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