CollectionsCamera
IN THE NEWS

Camera

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
June 19, 2011
Bron Imaging Group has reinvented the camera strap, which should benefit travelers toting bulky cameras. Designed to improve both comfort and security, Bron's Sun Sniper Pro padded adjustable camera straps are nylon, reinforced internally with steel wire, so they won't break and can't be snipped by would-be thieves. Unlike most conventional camera straps, which buckle or hook onto metal loops on the sides of the camera, the Sun Sniper attaches via a stainless-steel ball bearing that screws into the tripod socket on the bottom of the camera, making for more flexible movement when lifting to shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1989 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Winter is a grand time to make pictures outdoors, but it's also bad news for camera equipment. Batteries lose their zip. Shutters grow sluggish and film becomes brittle - the shutter speed you choose may not be the one you get, and the film sprockets tear inside your camera. Lenses fog up. Exposure meters begin acting strange when you most need them to expose subjects properly against the glare of ice or snow. You can't expect the camera that served so well in the spring and summer to function flawlessly in the cold unless you take care of it. For starters, install fresh batteries for everything - the meter, winder and flash.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"What you see is what you get" in new picture grabbers from Canon, Sharp and Polaroid. Canon has dreamed up a 35mm still camera so smart you'll think it's reading your mind. No matter where the object of your affection is moving within the field of the viewfinder, the camera knows what to keep in focus. Conventional auto-focus systems zero in only on the object in the direct center of the viewfinder. Canon's system, dubbed "eye-controlled autofocus," bounces a reflected infrared beam off the eyeball that's glued to the viewfinder.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2013 | By Alexandra Pecci, For The Inquirer
On Boston's Beacon Hill, a bright-red door, illuminated by a hanging lantern and framed by a brick archway, struck me as beautiful. So I pointed my camera and shot picture after picture until the door swung open, and a barefoot guy emerged, his hair a little tousled, his white T-shirt wrinkled from sleep. He didn't look up at the group of camera-wielding tourists standing feet away from him on the sidewalk. He simply bent over, plucked the newspaper from his stoop, and retreated quickly back into the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A movie like Everlasting Moments comes along maybe once in a decade. It is a portrait, incandescent and inspiring, of an accidental portraitist. She is Maria Larsson, Finnish emigrant to the port city of Malmo, Sweden, at the dawn of the 20th century. Maria, a working-class woman without pretensions, is nonetheless an artist of considerable gifts. Her medium is photography. Watch how instinctively she frames a fugitive image, like a child gently cupping a butterfly in her hands.
LIVING
November 29, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
A camera, however expensive or sophisticated, does not a photographer make. That point has been made here, in varying degrees of shrillness, no fewer than a dozen times in the last year alone, but it bears repeating. The photographer has to learn to see, to think, to compose through the viewfinder, and to move around to get the best photographs. The photographer who does all these well will find almost any camera an adequate tool. In other words, photographers need to worry less about the special gear they think they need and more about training themselves to use the cameras they already have.
SPORTS
December 12, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
John Daly smashed a spectator's camera into a tree yesterday while shooting a 6-over 78 in the first round of the Australian Open in Sydney. After pushing his tee shot wide on the ninth hole at the Royal Sydney Golf Club, Daly walked into a clump of trees, where spectator Brad Clegg tried to take a picture at close range. Daly snatched the camera and smashed it against the nearest tree, telling the man: "You want it back, I'll buy you a new one. " He later released a statement saying Clegg got too close.
SPORTS
August 2, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
If Michael Jordan hits a home run and it's not on video, did it happen? The Birmingham Barons outfielder, whose career highlights so far have been filmed inside NBA arenas, hopes to find a videotape of his first professional home run. Jordan's homer at Hoover (Ala.) Stadium on Saturday came so late in the evening that local television photographers had already packed up. "It was the bottom of the eighth and a late night," said team spokesman Chris Pika. "We would like to have a copy of it, and I think Michael would, too. " So the Barons are trying to get the word out to anyone in the record crowd of 13,751 who might have had a camera running when Jordan hit his homer.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Stephen Hagenbuch
As summer came to a close, I went for a run at the high school, a blazing end-of-summer sun beating overhead. But forget that exertion: I was exhausted much more by the two super-Moms I saw afterwards. It was the perfect day for a trip to the playground - and for some beautiful childhood memories. There were sunny skies and wide fields, swing sets and wooden forts, and slides for the mischief of American childhood. You and I might have made that mischief and memories on our own - but in this age of limitless gigabytes, it seems those memories now are to be scripted, posed, photographed and (due to that pesky childishness)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE DEATH OF Philadelphia college student Shane Montgomery, who went missing after a night of drinking in November and whose body was pulled from the frigid Schuylkill more than a month later, has spurred introduction of legislation that would require bars and restaurants to install outside surveillance cameras. City Council's Committee on Public Safety yesterday began taking testimony on the feasibility of such a law, but does not expect to take action until the fall so that all stakeholders can weigh in, said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., who sponsored the bill.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
AT FIRST, the commotion in front of the old police district's front walls attracted some stares. Then drivers pulled over and started taking pictures with their phones. Some marched up to police officers who were standing around and peppered them with questions. And then the damnedest thing happened: People started smiling. Laughing. Might even have done a little clapping, too. Velvet ropes, a red carpet and balloons hugged the entrance to Olney's 35th District headquarters — in honor of a movie night for dozens of excited local kids.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
What started as a push to have Philadelphia bars install exterior surveillance cameras on Monday became a broader debate about mandating cameras elsewhere, including all parking garages. The suggestion that garages be required to have cameras was made to City Council by the lawyer for a woman who was beaten and raped in a Center City garage on New Year's Day. "Regrettably, common sense has not been sufficient to convince the parking garages - some of them at least - to go forward and have video surveillance in all areas of public access," Shanin Specter told Council.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Betsy Bassel caught a shoplifter in her Old City vintage store nearly as soon as it opened a year ago. A teenage girl had tried to make off with a leather vest from Scout Salvage on Second Street. Bassel got the vest back, but worried about more thefts. Threats of calling the police didn't seem to work. But, she thought, shame might. "The worst-case scenario for me at that age would have been for my friends to know what I'd done," Bassel said, laughing. The store's approach to deterring shoplifters - warning, on signs posted around the store, that would-be thieves would have their photos posted to Instagram - worked for the better part of a year.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
AMTRAK PLANS to install internal cameras on its trains in the Northeast Corridor, allowing them to monitor train engineers, the corporation announced yesterday. The new safety measure follows the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188, which left eight passengers dead and about 200 injured. An investigation led by the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the train sped up from 70 to 102 mph as it approached a curve near Frankford Junction. A wide-angle camera will be added to each locomotive's cab, focusing on the engineer and the control console, Amtrak Spokesman Craig Schulz said.
SPORTS
May 27, 2015 | By the Inquirer Staff
Sydney Crenshaw of Woodstock, Ga., captured the Adult Amateur Jumper championship aboard Camera Ready on Monday at the Devon Horse Show and Country Fair. Camera Ready is owned by Fit to Print Farm of Woodstock. Alice Nolen-Walston of Unionville and her pony Olney Phunny Bones captured the Washington International Horse Show Shetland Pony Steeplechase. The Dixon Oval featured carriage competition, which is unique to the Devon show, a United States Equestrian Federation Heritage Event.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After Phoenixville police arrested a woman for public drunkenness almost two years ago, she claimed an officer at the station inappropriately grabbed her. So officers watched the videotape from an overhead camera in the station and determined she was lying. When they told her about the video evidence, she backed off the claim. Now, the department hopes adding body cameras will similarly keep civilians and officers accountable. Body-camera video can balance the civilian cellphone videos that have become more prevalent in controversial cases involving police, Chief William Mossman said.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
PHILADELPHIA'S 250 police surveillance cameras in recent years have documented shocking crimes and helped convict the evildoers responsible for them. But just how many of those cameras are operational? City officials say 93 percent are working and recording at any given time. But City Controller Alan Butkovitz told City Council yesterday that one-third of the cameras are broken, and some that work aren't even being monitored by human beings. Butkovitz said two reviews of the cameras by his office - in June 2012 and May 2013 - turned up the same results.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University announced Tuesday that its 34 public safety officers have begun using body cameras. The devices will be activated when officers respond to incidents, including theft, assault, and illegal alcohol or drug use, which are the most common offenses on campus. Rowan says it is the first university in New Jersey to have officers use the cameras. It paid $95,000 for the cameras and for electronic space to store the footage. Rowan pulled money from its general fund, which includes tuition dollars, to cover the costs, university officials said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|