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NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
A part-time cartooning instructor at the Perkins Center for the Arts was arrested yesterday and charged with attempted child endangerment and tampering with physical evidence after a concealed video camera was discovered in a second-floor bathroom of the center. Joseph E. Sheets, 36, of Pennsauken, was arrested after being questioned. He was released on a $10,000 bond. He could not be reached for comment yesterday. Police said that a man whom they idenified as Sheets can be seen on tape arranging the camera in the unisex bathroom.
SPORTS
May 5, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
No bumps. No bruises. No scratches. That word came yesterday from Phillies catcher Mike Lieberthal, who crashed into and, in effect, tackled a TV camera Wednesday night while trying to catch a popup near the far end of the Phillies' dugout. The camera fell on top of Lieberthal, and he became entangled in cables and the tripod supporting the camera. "Everything's fine," Lieberthal said, while watching replays of the wild scene on the clubhouse TV. "That was kind of fun. I'll probably do it again.
NEWS
March 4, 1994
The story of "The Camera Man," a.k.a. Phillip Lockett, is so improbable yet important that this newspaper took note of it recently on its front page. Mr. Lockett, a 44-year-old school district mechanic and an ex-Marine, is waging war on drug dealers with a little flash camera, a video camera and creativity - with noticeable results. He's been fighting to protect his North Philadelphia neighborhood for a decade, but has stepped up efforts in the last 18 months because a younger, even more callous crew of crooks moved in. He photographs drug transactions, blows out the speakers of a dealer's radio with his pump airgun and makes life as uncomfortable as possible for them.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
The case of Warminster's snooping supervisor has all the makings of a made- for-TV mystery movie. At the center is an amateur detective, an alleged Machiavellian conspiracy, some missing files and a hidden camera that catches the purported culprit in the act. Unfortunately, this story doesn't have a nice, neat solution, involving as it does the mistrust and political jockeying of an election year. Warminster Board of Supervisors Chairman Christopher Staub - a Republican - says that a)
LIVING
August 3, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Canon's new RC701 Still Video system provides a peek at photography's future. Although it looks very much like a slightly overweight standard 35mm camera, the RC701 records pictures not on film, but on a 2-inch magnetic floppy disk, a standard agreed upon by more than 40 companies interested in the electronic-still format. The disk can record 50 color pictures. Pictures may be played back immediately on a television set, sent over a phone line to someone else's TV set, stored for later use or printed in color.
NEWS
January 1, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard deFrenes helped make possible the first handheld cameras to show both Rocky Balboa and Ron Jaworski getting the punk beat out of them, then triumphing. "Dick was the Thomas Edison of NFL Films," Steve Sabol, the firm's president, said in a statement yesterday, marking Mr. deFrenes' passing. "He was a brilliant engineer, a tireless technician, and an ingenious inventor. " Mr. deFrenes, 78, who died of lung cancer Sunday at his home in Schwenksville, was director of camera technology when he retired in 1996 after almost 22 years with NFL Films in Mount Laurel.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Canon RC-20 looks more like a pair of pocket binoculars (or maybe a portable compact disc player) than a camera. Yes, this one-pound wonder does take pictures, recording the images electronically on a 2-inch floppy disc that resembles something you'd slide into the drive of a mini-computer. To enjoy family candids or vacation sights just captured with the RC-20, you don't hustle off to the nearest Fotomat. Simply run a line from the camera's output jack to a TV monitor's "video-in" jack, advance the disc in the camera to the frame you want, press the play button and the picture pops up on the TV screen in living color, with image quality equal to that of a top-notch videotape recording.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It really was a fluke. If there had not been room for just one more shot on the roll of film. And if Jamil Aromin had not been so overcome with shyness that he asked not to be in the photograph, his reading teacher might never have placed the camera in his hands. But Jamil, 13, a talented artist who has not owned a camera since he left the Philippines at age 8, looked through the view finder, focused and pressed the shutter button. And now his color photograph of seven fifth-grade classmates enjoying books outside St. Thomas Aquinas School on a sun-splashed spring day is on the cover of the March issue of the Reading Teacher.
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | By John Way Jennings and Stephanie Grace, FOR THE INQUIRER
The missing car of a slain Bordentown teacher may have been recorded twice by a video security camera at an adult bookstore the day he was killed, Burlington County Prosecutor Stephen G. Raymond, said yesterday. Investigators said videotape from the camera that scans the interior and exterior parking lot at the Bordentown Adult Center at Routes 130 and 206 showed a side view of a blue 1986 Honda that authorities believe was owned by James Semptimphelter, 42, who was strangled in his home during the morning or early afternoon of March 5. Raymond said it was impossible to see the driver or other possible car occupants on the videotape.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - A New Jersey Assembly committee approved a bill Thursday allowing some domestic-violence victims to testify remotely on camera, despite questions over whether the measure is constitutional. Sandy Clark, executive director of the New Jersey Coalition for Battered Women, said the legislation might encourage some victims to participate in the prosecution of their attackers. Some lawmakers questioned whether the measure would violate the provision in the Constitution allowing suspects to confront their accusers.
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