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LIVING
December 28, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
If you are one of those lucky people whose Christmas gifts included a 35mm camera, welcome to the ranks of the nation's prolific photographers. They shot 12.68 billion photographs in 1985 - almost 50 each for every man, woman and child in the country. The obvious, but still the best, way to start with new equipment is to read the instruction book. This can be pretty boring, but the instructions invariably contain information that you will not find out for yourself and that can make your life simpler later on. It is a good idea to run an entire roll of film through a new camera right away and get it processed immediately to determine if the camera is functioning properly.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | by Don Hewitt, New York Times
Although for years I favored cameras in courtrooms, I have concluded that the issue needs a lot more thought than people in my profession have been willing to give it. The old argument went something like this: We TV journalists are no different from print journalists, and it's high time the Fourth Estate stopped treating us like second-class citizens. Television's position in journalism is no longer an issue. When we first fought that battle, we suffered from an inferiority complex.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | By Sally Steenland
Lurking somewhere, beyond the range of the cameras is an appealing Bob Dole - a caring, likeable guy, say friends and colleagues who've known him for decades. Put him in front of a camera, though, and bad things happen. Through no fault of his own, Dole doesn't have a telegenic face - his eyebrows look dark and sinister, the set of his mouth seems grim. The camera doesn't flatter him - not the way it flatters Bill Clinton. The two men must know that, because Clinton in front of the camera is relaxed and open, while it seems an ordeal for Dole to face the lens.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Willie Edwin Turner Jr., a truck driver who never walked out of his house or climbed into his 18-wheeler without a camera slung over his shoulder, died Thursday. He was 61 and lived in West Philadelphia. Turner was a truck driver for Acme Markets for 30 years before retiring last month. It was the only job he ever had in Philadelphia after moving here in 1968 from his home in Palmetto, Fla. Besides bringing his growing family, Turner brought his cameras. "No matter where he went, he had his camera," said a daughter, Cynthia Newsome.
NEWS
April 3, 2009
FROM ALLEGATIONS that drug cops raided corner stores and bodegas, as highlighted by the Daily News "Tainted Justice" series, has emerged the disturbing image of cops clipping wires of store security cameras so their actions would go unwitnessed and unchecked. Reports that after the cameras were disabled, police looted the stores, taking money and merchandise, conjures a chilling image of a police state, where chaos and vigilante justice reign. Unfortunately, the camera blackout is a too-literal metaphor for the Philadelphia Police Department when it comes to oversight and accountability: For too long, the department has operated camera-less: in too much darkness, with no effective eyes that can shed light on its operations.
NEWS
September 2, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ron Howard will be working all weekend to capture the chaos on the Parkway. The Oscar-winning director has seven crews on-site shooting footage for a film of the festival to be released in 2013. Eight, if you count the back-up camera he's lugging around. "I'm actually shooting. That's the potluck camera," he says, laughing heartily on the phone Friday night. At the press conference this week announcing the venture, Howard declared, "This will not be a concert film. " But, as he explains, that statement was simply an alibi.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Pulse pounding, Al Francis rushed his granddaughter into the house, raced back to the patio, looked through the viewfinder and began shooting. Without premeditation, without really aiming, within a matter of seconds, it was over. All he could see now was the smoke curling into the California sky. Only when it cleared did he learn he had videotaped the death dive of an Aeromexico airliner over Cerritos, Calif., another horrifying image captured by an amateur with a home video camera.
NEWS
May 24, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
It used to be a tough proposition getting camera-shy people to do more than wave for a silent-movie camera operator. Nowadays, in this age of electronic sight and sound recording, it's not uncommon for normally animated people to freeze and clam up as soon as someone points a video-camcorder in their direction. And doesn't that annoying occurrence make you wonder why you blew $1,000 for that fancy-schmancy video machine? Born from such frustration - and his contemplation of 2 million camcorder sales in the United States this year alone - Toms River, N.J., camcorder owner John Marco has come up with a clever way to enliven home video shoots.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The first president to grow up in the age of television knew just what to do when 40 children arrived at the White House for a live televised session. Bill Clinton looked them straight in the eye, ignored the camera, and answered each child's question so personally that it seemed they were the only two people in the world. When a Florida teen said she was a recovering addict and asked what Clinton would do about drugs, he had a policy answer. But first, he said, "You're a brave girl and I'm glad you're here.
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