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NEWS
February 9, 2015
ISSUE | TRANSIT, ROADS Why not a 24-hour gateway to city transit? An Inquirer editorial stance on maintaining pedestrian access between Jefferson Station and the subway and PATCO lines while the Gallery undergoes reconstruction was well-taken ("It's more than a mall," Feb. 4). However, a similar situation has existed every night since the Gallery was built. Once retailers close, anyone transferring between the transit lines has been forced to ascend to street level and find his way to another entrance - all with little signage to guide the uninitiated.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to the death of Shane Montgomery - who drowned in the Schuylkill after leaving a Manayunk bar on Thanksgiving morning, but whose fate was a mystery for weeks afterward - Philadelphia City Councilman Curtis Jones Jr. wants to require every business that serves alcohol to install exterior cameras. "I don't want this to ever happen to anybody again," said Karen Montgomery, Shane's mother, who suggested the legislation. "I lost Shane for 36 days. And I looked for him for 36 days.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
WITH A mouse click, Carlesha Freeland-Gaither's blood-curdling screams echoed off the kitchen walls in the old house in Germantown the other day, as clearly as on the chilly Sunday night when a predator snatched her off the dark sidewalk outside. "I hate hearing it," said the man at the kitchen table with his laptop - a Germantown resident for two decades who lives steps from where the 22-year-old woman was abducted Nov. 2. On condition of anonymity, he spoke about the recording that his home surveillance system had caught.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
A few years back, right around Christmas, I got a surprise in the mail that was anything but a gift: a speeding ticket from a town right outside Washington in Montgomery County, Md. My crime: going 38 m.p.h. in a 30 m.p.h. zone. A couple years later, another family Thanksgiving in Washington yielded a similar December surprise: a ticket for running a red light, with the proof once again right there in the envelope. Yup, that was a grainy shot of our minivan midway through a Wisconsin Avenue intersection, the signal plainly on red. Both incidents came to mind this week, a week after New Jersey allowed its five-year experiment with red-light cameras to lapse and days after a Chicago Tribune study cast new doubts on the efficacy of the Windy City's extensive system, which posts electronic eyes at more than 350 intersections.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After five years, New Jersey's pilot red-light camera traffic program came to a quiet end. But the debate continues on whether the controversial experiment improved safety or was just a cash cow for municipalities that raked in millions from frustrated motorists. Six municipalities in Camden and Gloucester Counties installed cameras at nine intersections in South Jersey under the program, which began in 2009. The cameras nailed hundreds of thousands of motorists blowing through intersections when the light was red. At $85 each, the citations pulled in millions of dollars in fines for more than two dozen municipalities, which were allowed to keep the bulk of the money to add to their coffers.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
High-tech surveillance cameras are going up on street poles in suburban South Jersey communities where they are being used as virtual patrols to stretch police departments. Many have been installed quietly, netting a rash of drug dealers as well as petty criminals. In Riverside, a blue-collar town of 9,000, the equipment was used in recent years to disband a burglary ring and a Bloods Gang affiliate known as Sex Money Murder. Nearby, in Burlington City, the equipment captured an encounter with a vandal who had a ladder, a hammer, and a scheme to stop the incessant recording on a street corner known as a drug market.
NEWS
December 4, 2014
P ANO Kalogeropoulos, 31, of Fairmount, is a photographer who founded Bokeh Fire, which considers itself the Netflix of camera lenses. The company offers a curated set of lenses for rent monthly. Bokeh owns all the lenses rented out on its website. Bokeh launched a $20,000, 30-day crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter on Nov. 13 that has so far raised more than $15,000. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Bokeh Fire? A: I moved here in 2013 after graduating from business school at Northwestern, where I started thinking about this.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Police Department launched a pilot body-camera program Monday in which more than two dozen officers will wear the cameras while on duty for six months. It's a move that Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey has been advocating for months, and one that department officials say will increase transparency and "build community trust. " Ramsey was appointed Monday by President Obama to cochair the Task Force on 21st Century Policing, which aims to provide recommendations for local departments on building trust within communities, especially those of color.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's controversial red-light cameras are likely to go dark next month, as the five-year experimental program expires with no legislative push to renew it. Supporters of the cameras say the program has improved safety, while opponents contend the cameras have served only to enrich local and state governments. The program was scheduled to expire Dec. 16, unless the Legislature renews it. No such legislation has been introduced. There are 76 camera-equipped intersections in 25 New Jersey towns, including in the South Jersey communities of Cherry Hill, Gloucester Township, Stratford, Glassboro, Deptford, and Monroe Township.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
First Christmas, now Halloween. People keep stealing Josephine's decorations. "It's a disgrace," said the 66-year-old South Philadelphia grandmother. "I'm chaining everything down this Christmas. " Twice in less than a year, Josephine's home on the 1100 block of Fitzgerald Street has been pillaged by holiday thieves. For that reason, she asked that her last name not be printed. "I'm already being targeted," she said. At Christmas, it was her Santas holding big lollipops.
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