CollectionsCamille Paglia
IN THE NEWS

Camille Paglia

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the popular media, Philadelphia-based cultural critic Camille Paglia often is portrayed as a disruptive, antiauthoritarian feminist, a veritable banshee ripping apart all that's good, true, and beautiful. Her first book, after all, had the s-word in its title - Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence From Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson , which seemed to argue that all our treasured myths and art works were the expression of male anxiety over women's power to reproduce. Well, so much for media stereotypes.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
On a lazy Friday afternoon, Camille Paglia, the steel-plated Madonna of American intellectual life, drop-kicks verbal grenades in her corner office at Philadelphia's University of the Arts. The world's flashiest big-mouth scholar of 1990, she makes racetrack announcers sound like Parkinson's patients, and she knows it. "I am the most obnoxious woman in world history!" the 43-year-old humanities professor warns over the phone. Why argue? Did Cleopatra's eyes bulge like this? Could Joan of Arc spit out apostasy this fast?
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Our own Camille Paglia is the head cheerleader of a planned Museum of Sex in New York City. Why, we're shocked! It is, after all, no great surprise that Paglia - author, feminist basher, social taboo buster and all around outrageous pundit - is a big fan of sex and art. And, apparently, she's also a major fan of the woman behind the Museum of Sex: artist Alison Maddex, Paglia's longtime lover. The museum, described in yesterday's New York Post as "the ultimate in artistic exhibitionism" is in the planning stages, said Max Green, a Los Angeles publicist.
NEWS
September 7, 1991
At this point, considering the times and customs, we are not going to waste any breath complaining about the decision of Tai Collins, the erstwhile friend of Virginia Sen. Charles A. Robb, to disrobe for a Playboy photographer. (Yes, we admit it, we did skim the article and look briefly at the 15 color pictures while leafing through to find the interview with Philadelphia author Camille Paglia, which was the sole reason we purchased the magazine.) And Ms. Collins is also entitled to dispute the senator's claim that he never got more intimate with her than as the gracious recipient of a backrub in his New York hotel room.
NEWS
May 11, 1991
LOSERS IN THE LAND OF LOTUS-EATERS The children of the '60s have passed, and many of us, through folly, hubris or mischance, have died or been left sleeping in the land of the lotus-eaters. The palace has been taken over by shallow upstarts, raiding and wasting the treasury laid up by so many noble generations. It's time to clean house. . . . Most of this country's academic leftists are no more radical than my Aunt Hattie. Sixties radicals rarely went on to graduate school; if they did, they often dropped out. If they made it through, they had trouble getting a job and keeping it. They remain mavericks, isolated, off-center.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | Daily News wire services
John Wayne Bobbitt, best-known for suffering sexual mutilation at the hands of his wife, stole the show at the Oscars of X-rated movies to collect an honorary award for his first video. The fledgling actor, whose tape relating his adventure has broken all records to sell 60,000 copies in the United States alone, starred among the selected few collecting Golden Hot awards at a gala ceremony Wednesday night. Bobbitt, who became famous after his wife Lorena performed a penisectomy on him with a filleting knife, announced to applause that he was planning a sequel.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | By LARRY PLATT
And you thought Philadelphia was a cheesesteak and soft pretzel kind of town. Not so, according to a recent Newsweek cover story that listed the cultural elite's top 100. Quite expectedly, New York and Hollywood personalities dominated, but four prominent Philadelphians showed up on the list, more than from any other non-coastal city. According to Newsweek, Philadelphia's local "elitists" are: Houston Baker, director of the Center for the Study of Black Literature and Culture at the University of Pennsylvania and president of the Modern Language Association, which Newsweek simplistically credits with putting political correctness on the map; Camille Paglia, controversial University of the Arts scholar, termed a "cultural terrorist;" Rebecca Sinkler, editor of the New York Times Book Review, who commutes daily from her Center City home, and Bill Cosby, currently hosting You Bet Your Life, which, Newsweek writes, "even snotty critics love.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | BY ANN GERHART The New York Daily News, Washington Post, New York Post and USA Today contributed to this report
QUOTE "I was speechless . . . that in a time like this, when there are a great number of young people not going to school, he would encourage truancy. " - Attallah Shabazz, on Spike Lee's suggestion that blacks students take off Nov. 20 to see his movie about her father, Malcolm X. OLD BOYS WILL BE OLD BOYS The following item is strictly Below the Beltway stuff, not too interesting to Philadelphia types. But the sentiment is so incredible we just had to pass it on. Virginia GOP gubernatorial candidate George Allen (yeah, the son of the late Redskins coach)
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | D.H
Happy new year to all who helped us survive The traumatic crises of '95. Greetings, of course, to Mayor Rendell, C. Everett Koop and Patti LaBelle, Franny Rizzo, Governor Ridge And the mayor's lady, U.S. Judge Midge, Jane Dalton, the Library's Elliott Shelkrot, Bob Casey (you are not forgot). Drink a cup of kindness yet To Stockton Strawbridge, Joe Paquette, Bill Cosby. Let's sing "Auld Lang Syne" To Leon Sullivan, Frank Devine; Then sing another rousing chorus To Temple's Peter Liacouras, Wilson Goode and Moe Septee, Norma Shapiro, Rotan Lee, Cardinals Bevilacqua and Krol.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the popular media, Philadelphia-based cultural critic Camille Paglia often is portrayed as a disruptive, antiauthoritarian feminist, a veritable banshee ripping apart all that's good, true, and beautiful. Her first book, after all, had the s-word in its title - Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence From Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson , which seemed to argue that all our treasured myths and art works were the expression of male anxiety over women's power to reproduce. Well, so much for media stereotypes.
NEWS
December 2, 2011
I JUST GOT an early birthday present. Last Tuesday, while perusing the latest edition of Philadelphia Magazine , I happened upon a list of the "31 People We Wish Would Just Shut Up. " The "we" in question were the editors, of course. And there, at No. 10, was yours truly. My first reaction was: Really? Out of all the annoying people in this city, I made the final cut? (It wasn't actually a surprise. There is a petition to have my columns axed from the Daily News as well.
NEWS
December 31, 2010 | By DON HARRISON
Another year to welcome in verse (The one that's ending could hardly be worse). Hope springs eternal, so to all mentioned here, In Two Thousand Eleven, a Happy New Year. That means you, lame ducks Guv Ed Rendell, And Sen. Specter (you guys did well). Hang in, Michael Nutter, our embattled mayor (The job's impossible, concedes this naysayer). To his predecessors, our praise, if not love: John Street, Wilson Goode, Bill Green and the Guv. With holly boughs let the halls be decked For Tom Corbett (he's our governor-elect)
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lady Gaga may not be the well-adjusted, all-American girl we've been led to believe! So says Maureen Callahan in her allegedly sizzling tell-all bio, Poker Face: The Rise and Rise of Lady Gaga , which has been excerpted by RadarOnline. The book says Her Gracious Gagaship is "exceptionally passive-aggressive. . . . One minute she'll praise a staff member and the next minute they're fired. " Donald Trump -ian harshness! Seems Gaga has fired 150 people in the last two years.
NEWS
December 31, 2008
It's that time of year again. Time now for the Daily News' end-of-the-year editorial-page poem, written, as always, by former deputy editorial-page editor Don Harrison. - The Editors 'HAPPY NEW YEAR," shouts this Voice from the Past! Can the Phillies-Obama euphoria last, As the curs-ed economy makes us choose Between books and bucks? Now, names in the news: Season's greetings to Mayor Nutter, To every dedicated Mummers Strutter, To our governor, ex-mayor Ed Rendell, Vanguard's John Bogle, Patti LaBelle, Lawrence Summers (to D.C. he's goin')
NEWS
April 9, 2006 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When my beat was the body, I was required to study the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue. I soon learned never to leave the magazine on my desk. If I did, it was quickly swiped - by my female colleagues. In my presence, they'd page through it, criticizing these rare beauties for alleged flaws and artificial enhancements that utterly escaped my notice. Over the past 45 years, I've been in countless locker rooms, where men dispense opinions as naked as their bodies, and I've never heard guys dissect and disparage women so lustily and viciously.
NEWS
September 7, 2005 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Summer of '65, New York. Offices of Cosmopolitan, a stodgy intellectual magazine seemingly headed for oblivion but for a historic makeover that would soon be heard in bedrooms 'round the world. For her first cover, newly appointed editor Helen Gurley Brown, 43, wanted gorgeous. "Sensationally beautiful," Brown recalled. But not the imperious fashion-model look. More inviting. And then there was another issue. "Immediately, I thought about cleavage," Brown said in a recent interview.
NEWS
May 11, 2005 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Best to begin with the poetry itself, because that is the point, the reason Camille Paglia has, in her words, "been totally off the scene" for the last five years - though even an off-the-scene Paglia will gladly blister through a wide range of topics at her typical talking speed of 100 words per minute (we counted). But it's poetry to which Paglia has turned her impressive-if-combative intellect - a medium she says demands close attention to every word, every line, even to the way the words look on the page.
LIVING
October 10, 1999 | By W. Speers, compiled from Inquirer wire services
Glen Downie is the first poet hired to teach at a Canadian medical school. "Health professionals see the full range of human emotions in the run of the day, but there often isn't an outlet to express the emotions," said Downie, artist-in-residence at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. "I hope to encourage medical students and faculty to use writing as an outlet for those feelings. " Among the ex-medical social worker's works are "Prosthetics" and "Sudden Infant Death.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Our own Camille Paglia is the head cheerleader of a planned Museum of Sex in New York City. Why, we're shocked! It is, after all, no great surprise that Paglia - author, feminist basher, social taboo buster and all around outrageous pundit - is a big fan of sex and art. And, apparently, she's also a major fan of the woman behind the Museum of Sex: artist Alison Maddex, Paglia's longtime lover. The museum, described in yesterday's New York Post as "the ultimate in artistic exhibitionism" is in the planning stages, said Max Green, a Los Angeles publicist.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|