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Camouflage

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NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By David A. Fahrenthold, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The House approved a measure Friday that would require all branches of the U.S. military to share the same camouflage uniforms - instead of the 10 different camouflage patterns in use today. The measure, written by freshman Rep. William Enyart (D., Ill.), was passed as part of the broader National Defense Authorization Act, which sets the Pentagon's budget. The measure passed by a vote of 315-108. That idea needs the approval of the Senate, which is crafting its own version of the defense authorization bill.
NEWS
September 12, 2007 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The search for escaped killer William Enman, who walked away from a Camden County psychiatric hospital Sunday afternoon, stretched across the state and even extended to Canada. In the end, though, Enman may not have gotten very far. He was found yesterday afternoon on the grounds of the state-run Ancora Psychiatric Hospital, the facility he fled. The 65-year-old Marine veteran was dressed in camouflage, soaked to the bone, and suffering from a number of bumps and scratches.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
It seems easy enough: Your company makes pants. You get an order. You fill it. No problem. Wrangler, a division of VF Corp. of Wyomissing, Berks County, makes pants. Until three months ago it was mostly jeans. That's what Wrangler is known for. But when duty calls - and it came in an order from the U.S. government - how does your plant suddenly start turning out 95,000 pairs of desert camouflage pants per month, 1 million pairs by the end of the contract? That's Wrangler's current commitment.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
Even the word of God is dressed in desert camouflage colors in the Middle East. According to the American Bible Society, the Pentagon Chaplains Board has ordered 50,000 Bibles for military personnel in Operation Desrt Storm. Col. Meredith R. Standley, executive director of the U.S. Armed Forces Chaplains Board, said in a statement that "these Scriptures, with unique covers of a camouflage pattern and reduced in size, will help meet the multifaceted spiritual needs of our military personnel.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Black trench coats apparently don't do much for local teens, but retailers say kids do find ways to set themselves apart through their clothing. "Most of the kids coming here are trying to look like individuals. If they want to look like everybody else, they go to the Gap or Old Navy," said Nana Goldberg, vice president of the Original I. Goldberg, Chestnut Street near 9th in Center City. The store specializes in authentic military gear of recent vintage. The popular military attire these days is camouflage: tank tops, pants, T-shirts, jackets and caps.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bold security breach at Brangelina estate Paparazzi in camouflage gear - camouflage gear?! - breached the Brangelina compound in Southern France on Thursday, touching off a melee with security guards at the celeb couple's Miraval estate. War is no longer a metaphor: There's an all-out, honest-to-goodness jihad, conflict, crusade between the celeb and photog tribes. (The latter have been whipped into a frenzy since the birth July 12 of Brad and Angelina's twins.) Freelance 'razzo Luc Goursolas said he broke a guard's hand and bit another one till he drew blood.
SPORTS
August 30, 2010 | By Al Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Who ARE those guys?' That line, uttered by Paul Newman in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, referring to the mysterious posse that unerringly and relentlessly tracked him and Robert Redford across the country as they fled from the law, could well apply to this year's Atlanta Braves. Except the Braves aren't the ones doing the chasing. Not expected to make much of a dent before the season, the Braves have been looking more and more like the Atlanta of old, steadfastly clinging to the NL East lead as they try to win their first division title since 2005 in this, manager Bobby Cox's final season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider that a leopard has spots. But a zebra has stripes. A rose is red. Yet a violet is blue. More esoterically, elks have branched antlers. But bighorn sheep have spiral horns. These are some of the differences posed - and debated - in a new exhibit called "Stripes, Spots and Disorderly Dots," that opens today at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia and continues through Dec. 31. "After people have seen this exhibit, we hope they will look at nature in a different way," said Raylene Decatur, the academy's exhibit director.
SPORTS
April 24, 1990 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the present is this good, there's no need to think about the future. Just ask Cincinnati Reds reliever Rob Dibble, Nasty Boy, collector of state trooper hats and baseball suspensions. After he and his lefthanded bullpen counterpart, Randy Myers, had spent two weeks coming up with the Nasty Boys nickname for the relief corps, Dibble was asked what came next. Now that the nickname problem was solved, what would occupy the free time of Dibble and his fellow Nasty Boys? "Hell," he said.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
Jean Kelly, 28, of Secane, has helped heal a lot of her little brother's hurts over the years, but lately she's been playing a part in sending him band-aids at his temporary home overseas. Little brother George J. Kelly is now 20 and a specialist four with the Army's G-Troop stationed in Germany who may likely end up among other U.S. troops sent to the Persian Gulf region. Trained in medic procedures, George works with military bandages produced by Jean and other workers at Elwyn Inc.'s Health Products Division in Media, and according to Jean, her brother is among many U.S. soldiers who are grateful for the increased bandage supply that Elwyn employees have been churning out in response to the crisis.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By David A. Fahrenthold, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The House approved a measure Friday that would require all branches of the U.S. military to share the same camouflage uniforms - instead of the 10 different camouflage patterns in use today. The measure, written by freshman Rep. William Enyart (D., Ill.), was passed as part of the broader National Defense Authorization Act, which sets the Pentagon's budget. The measure passed by a vote of 315-108. That idea needs the approval of the Senate, which is crafting its own version of the defense authorization bill.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
CAMOUFLAGE IS going from the battlefield to the streets. The military pattern is trending with stylish men and women who rock it alongside traditional jackets and pants for a fresh look.   Contact Reuben Harley at BIGRUBE@streetgazing.com , or follow on Twitter @BigRubeHarley. Read his blog at streetgazing.com.
SPORTS
August 30, 2010 | By Al Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Who ARE those guys?' That line, uttered by Paul Newman in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, referring to the mysterious posse that unerringly and relentlessly tracked him and Robert Redford across the country as they fled from the law, could well apply to this year's Atlanta Braves. Except the Braves aren't the ones doing the chasing. Not expected to make much of a dent before the season, the Braves have been looking more and more like the Atlanta of old, steadfastly clinging to the NL East lead as they try to win their first division title since 2005 in this, manager Bobby Cox's final season.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bold security breach at Brangelina estate Paparazzi in camouflage gear - camouflage gear?! - breached the Brangelina compound in Southern France on Thursday, touching off a melee with security guards at the celeb couple's Miraval estate. War is no longer a metaphor: There's an all-out, honest-to-goodness jihad, conflict, crusade between the celeb and photog tribes. (The latter have been whipped into a frenzy since the birth July 12 of Brad and Angelina's twins.) Freelance 'razzo Luc Goursolas said he broke a guard's hand and bit another one till he drew blood.
NEWS
September 12, 2007 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The search for escaped killer William Enman, who walked away from a Camden County psychiatric hospital Sunday afternoon, stretched across the state and even extended to Canada. In the end, though, Enman may not have gotten very far. He was found yesterday afternoon on the grounds of the state-run Ancora Psychiatric Hospital, the facility he fled. The 65-year-old Marine veteran was dressed in camouflage, soaked to the bone, and suffering from a number of bumps and scratches.
NEWS
May 26, 2005 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Military camouflage, created during World War I to hide soldiers from spotter planes, has been co-opted by war protesters, adopted by fashion designers, and embraced by snowboarders. Now, with the war in Iraq, it has invaded the nursery. Infants are drooling on camo bibs, sleeping on camo sheets, and wearing diaper covers in the green, brown and black Woodland pattern that, when viewed through night-vision goggles, makes soldiers look like trees. Phil Galloway, owner of Hangar 18 Surplus in Bulverde, Texas, believes popular culture rediscovers camo every time the military tweaks it. How fast does camo travel from battlefield to boutique?
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women around the country are getting up early to have coffee with him in his jammies, err, cammies. In chatrooms, men praise him as a "straight shooter" and "a no-B.S. type of guy. " For many on the home front, his briefings are must-see events, even though they're shown on cable at 7 a.m. It's not just that Army Brig. Gen. Vincent Brooks, 44, whose father was managing director of Philadelphia in the mid-'80s, is telegenic. It's that confidence seeps from his every pore.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2003 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't until mid-January that the talk of a war with Iraq got serious for most people. But for the military-supply depot in Northeast Philadelphia - which is providing everything from desert-camouflage pants to toothpaste for the troops in Kuwait and elsewhere - the minute talk of war surfaced last summer in Washington, the need to prepare for a conflict began. In a short time, the 2,900-employee Defense Supply Center Philadelphia was notifying its military suppliers to be ready.
NEWS
January 6, 2003
Harrisburg lawmakers haven't exactly been tripping over each other to institute public financing or voluntary spending limits for statewide elections. Early last year the House shot down a workable proposal that would have shrunk the obscene pots of money spent on campaigns, as well as reduced the potency of special-interest spending. What followed in the spring and fall was the state's costliest campaign ever for governor. In other words, business as usual. So it's ironic that a footnote to the political history of Pennsylvania last year could read as follows: While millions were raised from traditional campaign sources, state lawmakers of both political parties also turned to taxpayers for a few bucks to boost their electoral fortunes.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Black trench coats apparently don't do much for local teens, but retailers say kids do find ways to set themselves apart through their clothing. "Most of the kids coming here are trying to look like individuals. If they want to look like everybody else, they go to the Gap or Old Navy," said Nana Goldberg, vice president of the Original I. Goldberg, Chestnut Street near 9th in Center City. The store specializes in authentic military gear of recent vintage. The popular military attire these days is camouflage: tank tops, pants, T-shirts, jackets and caps.
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